or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Irregular Moguls

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I am a passionate and aspiring mogul skier.  I have read Dan DiPiro's book many times and have gotten to the point where I can ski regular-like, decently steep moguls roughly in a line.  However, this week I am out at Snowbird in UT and am finding it difficult to follow the same form on much larger, steeper and irregular moguls on runs such as Gadzooks.  I start in a rhythm at the top and then there are larger moguls with gulf sized lanes in between.  I have done these a few times where I ski inbetween every mogul until one of these bigger moguls and then ski a turn or two and try to stay in control, but I don't see the expert moguls skiers on youtube doing this.  Otherwise, I have these huge airborne drops inbetween the moguls and cannot recover my form.  I have skied these non-stop over the past few days and don't feel I have been hugely successful unless I am being too hard on myself.  Some help, insights, and/or advice would be greatly appreciated!

post #2 of 14

Speed control down the zipperline in steep terrain == IMPACT on a regular basis imo.

 

You need to advance from a bump skier into a mogul skier by defying the rut and the mountain by skiing into and over the mogul then down the smooth backside instead of skiing around it. 

 

I call this the technical line where speed control is gained from turn shape an brushing by consistently finishing the turns.

 

Learn to turn when and where you want to confidently  gain speed control anywhere on the mountain without the pounding impact you experience after statically waiting to drop to the bottom of the rut below you as you are probably experiencing at the Bird.

 

Forget the zipperline and ski into the mogul face followed by a sweet backside turn (major speed control turn) using the same turn you would make on steep groomed.

 

 

Hope this gives you some new ideas and things to work on.

 

Nail

post #3 of 14

@HighlineBowl where do you normally ski?    

 

The bumps, well, kinda suck at Snowbird.  It's just not a good mountain for making great bumps.  Too much snow, too fat skis, and too few good bumps skiers.   In a lower snow year like this, I think the combination of the latter two leaves the mess you described.  :duck:

 

Consider a trip to Mary Jane to ski great bumps!  :D 

post #4 of 14

There is no such thing as a bad bump.

 

Maintaining a consistent rhythm in irregular bumps can be extremely difficult. Applying different tactics to deal with different bump shapes is a lot easier. Build up your available tactical options. Varying your blend of speed control coming from turn shape, edge angle and absorption can lead to dozens of different tactical options for an individual bump. For example instead of going along a rutted line you can ski across the line or if the rut walls are to steep to ski across, leap over vs go around high or low. Another example is using a "micro skid" throughout an entire turn by using a lower edge angle to "smear" the turn to use a small amount of skidding to add extra speed control. If a mogul is so big that you pick up to much speed following the rut line, cut it in half by turning out of the rut line and ski across the top into the rut onto the other side. If a mogul is big enough you can ski it like a spine and hop turns on either side of the ridge until you run out of bump. Of course, increasing your foot speed and your physical strength will always give more options too.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

There is no such thing as a bad bump.

 

True, but sometimes I say, "Wow, these are really nice bumps."  when they are round and regular. 

 

Maybe we should expand the snow saying to

"There are good bumps, and there are bumps that are good for you."

post #6 of 14

to say the least, skiing irregular moguls is a challenge. Without seeing the shapes, best advice I can say is throw an extra turn. Your COM has to stay center (fore/aft & lateral) on top of the skis. IMO, that's not in vogue around here but is needed to throw that turn fast.

 

Look at Brassard, his hip does not drop into the turn, they are staying over center.

 

 

post #7 of 14

HighlineBowl, I believe that I know the bumps you speak of. Those two videos are great but those are not the same bumps, the stuff you are talking about is more like going over the top of a Volkswagen Rabbit and then doing it again. If you aren't 12' tall.  You will not absorb those bad boys, you will not keep your tips on the snow.  Just ski them, attack them, enjoy them and survive them (what does not kill you.........................).

 

Tball nailed it, if you are on a good ski for Snowbird, it probably is not a bump ski. There have been some great bump competitions up there but not off of the tram.

post #8 of 14
Engage your core. It's what keeps your body from flopping about like a sack of potatoes, and enables your skis to turn under your body. "Hold the fart" and bring the belly button towards the spine.

When planting, keep your upper body flowing downhill by driving the planting hand forward. If your hand falls back, you are likely to rotate. "poke them in the toes, then punch them in the nose."

Get early pressure on the new outside ski. You may need to start releasing turns earlier rather than hanging on. Continually turn.

Extend your legs into troughs. They will compress when you reach the bump. It's the lack of extending that screws most skiers up.

Above all else, smile and recognise how lucky you are to be skiing bumps while everyone else is stuck in the office wink.gif

(Edited to fix cell phone "autocorrect" errors)
Edited by Metaphor_ - 3/21/15 at 4:16am
post #9 of 14
There are two ways to ski bumps and moguls. Pivot under foot or follow the tip. For me I was a follow the tip guy (old school is hard to break). Most of the new school is pivot under foot.

Either method, pick your line and control your speed just enough to run it. Expect the unexpected and adjust accordingly.

One other thing, the younger you are the easier it is because you don't usually fully acknowledge the consequences.

Now that I'm older, I'll ski moguls if required but I definity don't seek them out any more.
post #10 of 14
I don't think anyone at the NE Gathering yesterday at Mad River managed to avoid skiing irregular moguls for more than about half a run at a time. At least not without writing off exploration. And who wants to do that? Anyway, good place to go to work on that skill.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack97 View Post
 

to say the least, skiing irregular moguls is a challenge. Without seeing the shapes, best advice I can say is throw an extra turn. Your COM has to stay center (fore/aft & lateral) on top of the skis. IMO, that's not in vogue around here but is needed to throw that turn fast.

 

Look at Brassard, his hip does not drop into the turn, they are staying over center.

 

 

This was back when "mogul" skiing was a real display of skiing.

 

Now it just seems to be a jump competition with minor turn and time criteria thrown in at the last minute.

 

Now they all just seem to sit in the exact same zipper line, with the exact same ski placement and looking exactly the same as everyone else (especially to the layman) and wait for the jumps to come.

post #12 of 14
Met has covered most of it, except the idea of controlling how equalizing pressure throughout the turn becomes a much stronger objective. Obviously the better we absorb as the tips rise (rather than use a hard check), the easier it is to allow the torso to flow. It also allows us to extend and drop the tips into the trough instead of struggling to recenter through the first third of the new turn.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Engage your core. It's what keeps your body from flopping about like a sack of potatoes, and enables your skis to turn under your body. "Hold the fart" and bring the belly button towards the spine.

 

 

haha... i like that one.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack97 View Post

haha... i like that one.
stolen from the best (JF)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching