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Canting correction- recommended shop in CO?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

My wife has a pretty significant A-Frame problem, and getting her on the same edge of both skis is a real challenge. To me, it looks like a classic canting issue.

 

We stopped by the local master bootfitter here, but the fitter said he is unsatisfied with the results from shims and grinding boots to correct cants, and the only solution he recommends (and performs) is Fisher Vacuum Boots.  We don't have the $650, and would like to try shims or the like to confirm the problem and the results of the solution.

 

Really looking for a second opinion here.  I appreciate that vacuum boots are probably a pretty good solution, but this problem was not unsolveable before they were released.

 

So...

 

1. What is the easiest, cheapest, best way to correct canting? Binding shim? What should this cost?

 

2. Anybody have a recommendation of somebody in CO to do the work?

post #2 of 10
Greg Hoffman

http://www.skibootfitting.com

Beaver creak and he may still have a place at Lions Head, Vail.

Ask him about using duct tape to play with some adjustments.

While for some people canting under the binding works and it is less expensive than boot adjustments, keep in mind you will be tied to those skis and you will have a left and right ski unless you swap the binding shims from time to time (not recommended)

A balancing, grind and plate can be 200+ Depending on the shop.


DC
post #3 of 10

I am on the east coast so I can't help with a location.  However, I have my fair share of personal experience with canting.

 

My left leg is a little bow legged.  This, coupled with the fact that the race boots I am running are canted a bit to the outside to start  required me to have some work done bring me back to the inside.  (So the opposite direction as your wife.  My understanding is that A-frame is awful common in females)  

 

Anyway, for me the process was getting fit in the shop, trying it out by making binding shims out of duct tape, and then having my soles ground and lifters added.  If you go this route, about 3 strips of duct tape on your AFD (and on an appropriate place on the heal) will equal 1/2 a degree.  I was fitted at 1* inside on my left and neutral on my right.  I have no doubt this is "correct" but for me having my two feet different after decades without canting didn't feel right.  I tried 1* on both but that didn't work at all.  I have gone to 1/2 on each boot and I am very happy.

 

I have never tried the Vacuum boot.  But, it certainly isn't the only way.  That's for sure.

 

I wonder if the shop has the capability to grind boot soles, or even if they do maybe they just would like to avoid it.  I've found that even 1/2 a degree matters so there isn't much margin for error.  A little goes a long way with canting.

 

Another thought is that the boots your wife is looking at aren't a model that can be ground. That's very possibly the issue.

 

I spend a decent amount of time at Wolf Creek.  I am curious what shop you went to?

 

Finally, my comment about shims is obvious - you can only use the skis on one foot, which is not ideal at all.

 

Have your wife try the duct tape trick since it's temporary and she can at least see what she likes.

post #4 of 10
Depending on the duct tape your amount will vary. Good 3m duct tape 2 layers thick is .5 degrees. That thinner home depot "duck tape" takes 3 layers.

Tear off half inch wide strips 2-3" long and lay them along the edge of her boots. Same amount on the toe and heel. If you do it before you actually step outside, while the boots are very dry, it will stay on for the whole day, even weeks if you don't walk on them or use cat tracks.

All boots can be canted. It may take some creativity on the part of the fitter and many boots are easier to grind but it can be done. Of course it gets to the point of is the cost worth it. The more a fitter has to do to make it safe, the more they will charge you. For women in a 21 or 22 shell, you may not have a choice to find a boot that has solid lugs.

On a boot I just did for a friend, I had to take off the "replaceable" boot bottoms screw them to a board with plastic screws so I could safely run them through the planer. I then had to manually set the toe and heel parts for slight rise angle. I then had to fill some of the voids with epoxy before re-attaching the lugs so the screws that hold the plates had something to bite into.

Re vacuum boots. They will address part of a cant issue but it is still on the tech to be able to set them up so that the base of the boot has the proper cant angle during the vacuum process. Otherwise all they are doing is adjusting the boot so that the tib/fib exits the cuff centered. The sole canting is another part of the process independent of the cuff alignment.

Re locations and fitters. Greg Hoffman was one of my instructors at MasterfitU for my stance and alignment/dark arts course.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post

Greg Hoffman

http://www.skibootfitting.com

Beaver creak and he may still have a place at Lions Head, Vail.

DC[/quote

Located at the top of Vail too. Greg is just at the BC location these days I'm told. A friend of mine works for him at the Vail location.
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:

 

I spend a decent amount of time at Wolf Creek.  I am curious what shop you went to?

 

 

 

Larry at the Ski and Bow Rack is a master certified bootfitter, highly regarded, and the only one I know of in the area.

 

To be honest, I was a bit surprised to hear him wave off working on canting in favor of a new vacuum boot- in the past he's been very accommodating.

 

Thanks for the duct tape suggestions. I'll do a plumb bob measurement, and give it s shot.

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

Larry at the Ski and Bow Rack is a master certified bootfitter, highly regarded, and the only one I know of in the area.

 

To be honest, I was a bit surprised to hear him wave off working on canting in favor of a new vacuum boot- in the past he's been very accommodating.

 

Thanks for the duct tape suggestions. I'll do a plumb bob measurement, and give it s shot.

Hi anachronism,

 

My girlfriend had a similar knock-kneed/canting issue, and the great folks at Ski and Bow Rack fitted her into some Fischer Vacuums (Trinity 110), and it's worked wonders. I have taken some before/after skiing videos of her, and I see a big difference in her skiing style. I knew it was working, because the second day in her new boots, she wanted to do steeper/ more technical terrain than she was comfortable with before. She also has had ankle surgery, and had a major pressure point that is much more manageable in the Fischers.  I am thinking about getting some Fischers myself next season. :) 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post
 
Quote:


Located at the top of Vail too. Greg is just at the BC location these days I'm told. A friend of mine works for him at the Vail location.

I think they closed the on-mountain shop.  

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

I think they closed the on-mountain shop.  

Good to know-I didn't get out there this season.
post #10 of 10
There's also Jim Lndsay at Aspen Highlands base. He posts here also. Bergeron used to have a forum here and Hoffman has posted in the past also.

http://www.bootech.net/
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