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Anybody like deep slush?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I kinda like slush if it's not over my boot. Went out yesterday in bc slush almost up to my knees and lets just say I'm not a fan. Could manage a bit after I picked up a bit of speed but had to make sure I had a clearing to get going. Had to stop many times. Any slush hounds have tips when it's deep and sticky?
post #2 of 28

Not my favorite by any means but can be enjoyable if, and only if, the slope is steep enough.

post #3 of 28
GS cheater skis. This is what happens when you are part of the 75%.

http://www.epicski.com/t/133389/75-of-you-have-wrong-skis/90#post_1849480
post #4 of 28

I like it better when it's frozen, but any skiing is better than no skiing.

post #5 of 28
Me too!!! And it's best when it never softens up at all. Because then I can pretend I am in Quebec!!!
post #6 of 28

As long as it is granular slush and not grippy sticky glop/schmoo - this is huge fun. I suppose it should be no surprise that a ski shaped like a waterski would do well in wetter phase H2O.... :D Not entirely sure aboutt knee deep though....

 

post #7 of 28
Knee deep, I'd leave. Why spend the rest of my life with knee issues?
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
Yeah I didn't leave but I abandoned the notion of turning through trees. Too risky for my slusability level. Just found some little clearings where I could go straight and go off some tiny drops. Then stuck the skis in the "snow" and hiked around. Water skis may have worked!
post #9 of 28

Full Rocker, wide waists, base structure, warm temp wax, steep slopes, high edge angles, speed, strong legs and confidence.

post #10 of 28

122mm waist Slushers.

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJQIV View Post

Full Rocker, wide waists, base structure, warm temp wax, steep slopes, high edge angles, speed, strong legs and confidence.

It's the strong legs part that does me in.. Start looking for shorter or slower lifts.
post #12 of 28

Rill your bases and then just roll'm and squirt.  I love slush, you can go fast and stop on a dime.  Angle your skis any way you want and it instantly builds a platform under them.  You can ski one-footed or equally weighted.  Classic "big guy" conditions.  Most substantial l skis with decent size tips work well, but I prefer my Icelantic Keepers.  Guess how I got my name?

post #13 of 28
He's talking KNEE DEEP slush.
post #14 of 28


If you hit it hard enough you can beat it into any shape you want, as long as the bottom is  not rotten.

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
 

122mm waist Slushers.

"I may not always ski slush, but when I do ....

Stay surfy, my friends ..."

post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
 

Rill your bases and then just roll'm and squirt.  I love slush, you can go fast and stop on a dime.  Angle your skis any way you want and it instantly builds a platform under them.  You can ski one-footed or equally weighted.  Classic "big guy" conditions.  Most substantial l skis with decent size tips work well, but I prefer my Icelantic Keepers.  Guess how I got my name?


Those Keepers are not exactly skinny...  Though arguably on the skinny end of decent slush skis IMO.  Just bigger tips on narrower skis won't do it. The issues are much the same as powder.

 

 IME meaningfully deep slush (more than an inch or maybe two), higher edge angles and skinnier skis don't go together. If you are going too slowly, you sink. If you go fast enough to generate higher edge angles you "break through" the apex of the turn and slide whether you like it or not. 2X if the snow is on the border of unconsolidated and slush. 2X all of that if you try to ski one footed on narrower skis as a bigger person. The Powder Boards I pictured above  (and other fat rockered skis) will let you do damn near anything you want with little effort. "Skinny" skis require the kind of finesse and technique adjustment that they require in powder. Obviously I'm not talking about just a skiff of surface slush...

 

The one downside to my preferred class of slush ski is that if you hit mixed conditions - still frozen or chunky in the AM, refreezing in shadow in the PM, etc. - life can be sub-optimal...:) 

post #17 of 28
I liked slush till an hour ago. Liftie held on to the chair too long so it rocked big time. Buried my tips into a foot of slush which instantly tossed me into said slush. Seriously haven't done anything like that in the past 40 years. 41 years ago I might have....
post #18 of 28

Ok...

 

Am I reading correctly that you were in the Backcountry? Makes sense because I cannot imagine an inbounds ski area keeping a run open with knee deep slush.

 

If it is unfrozen to that degree, you should have been off that terrain many hours before, or at the very least off anything that could slide, which also means anything that would be even remotely skiable in knee deep slush.

 

Wet Slab avalanches are deadly, but they are also pretty easy to not get caught in- get off terrain before it unfreezes much above the ankle.

 

As for slush, I LOVE good slushy corn and mashed potatoes. By far my favorite time of the year to ski- it is like powder that doesn't get skied out.

 

Deepest slush I have ever been in was maybe 8"- and the ski area closed that terrain shortly after.

post #19 of 28
I guess I was in crotch deep slush when that avalanche released in front of us. Didn't know it was that deep until I took the skis off, though. I'd have said ankle deep.
post #20 of 28

Slightly OT. On an early May Summit ski day we ran into Slush with Ice chunks. It was sketchy at least for my low level of skill.

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess I was in crotch deep slush when that avalanche released in front of us. Didn't know it was that deep until I took the skis off, though. I'd have said ankle deep.

 

I love slush, but get off of it before it goes isothermic. 

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess I was in crotch deep slush when that avalanche released in front of us. Didn't know it was that deep until I took the skis off, though. I'd have said ankle deep.

 

My guess is the ski area wasn't expecting that level of melt in January/Feb (whichever it was, I forget) and wasn't really evaluating things to the degree that would have been warranted.  I mean, who really expects an inbounds wet slab in the muddle of winter?

post #23 of 28
January 25
post #24 of 28

That's why they make fat skis. Also why I bought Volkl Shiro's, great torsional stiffness, they don't get pushed around as they are floating through the slop.

 

Google the fat ski you want and read the reviews. Look for performance in heavy snow.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Ok...

 

Am I reading correctly that you were in the Backcountry? Makes sense because I cannot imagine an inbounds ski area keeping a run open with knee deep slush.

 

If it is unfrozen to that degree, you should have been off that terrain many hours before, or at the very least off anything that could slide, which also means anything that would be even remotely skiable in knee deep slush.

 

Wet Slab avalanches are deadly, but they are also pretty easy to not get caught in- get off terrain before it unfreezes much above the ankle.

 

As for slush, I LOVE good slushy corn and mashed potatoes. By far my favorite time of the year to ski- it is like powder that doesn't get skied out.

 

Deepest slush I have ever been in was maybe 8"- and the ski area closed that terrain shortly after.

 

Many years ago I was in south-facing back bowls of Vail in April.  First attempt at skiing the back bowls revealed coral reef conditions, so we came back a little later to find "crunchy slush"...  some kind of still-frozen on top of glop.  That was "entertaining".  So we came back a little later to find deep slush.  I don't know remember if it was knee deep, but then again, I'm fairly tall.  It was some of the most unskiable crap I've ever had the misfortune to encounter.

 

I don't have any great insight into the sort of skis that would work well in those conditions, other than to say that mid-80-waisted skis aren't it.

 

I assume the back bowls of Vail avalanche on occasion.  We didn't go back into the bowls again to see if they had closed it or not; after going oh-for-three in trying to ski the Back Bowls we determined there was no real desire to try a fourth time.

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

 

Many years ago I was in south-facing back bowls of Vail in April.  First attempt at skiing the back bowls revealed coral reef conditions, so we came back a little later to find "crunchy slush"...  some kind of still-frozen on top of glop.  That was "entertaining".  So we came back a little later to find deep slush.  I don't know remember if it was knee deep, but then again, I'm fairly tall.  It was some of the most unskiable crap I've ever had the misfortune to encounter.

 

I don't have any great insight into the sort of skis that would work well in those conditions, other than to say that mid-80-waisted skis aren't it.

 

I assume the back bowls of Vail avalanche on occasion.  We didn't go back into the bowls again to see if they had closed it or not; after going oh-for-three in trying to ski the Back Bowls we determined there was no real desire to try a fourth time.

 

Most areas of the back bowls are too mild to have any real risk of sliding under anything but truly exceptional conditions- which is probably also why it sucked so bad. BSB has slopes with distinctly more risk.

post #27 of 28

slush is greatly preferable to sun cups. Sometimes the resorts put their moguls away while the slopes are still open and you wind up skiing on the bottoms of them. At least that's how I think that's what they are.

post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
This was small NE "secret spot" backcountry hill. No risk of avalanche. Maybe like 250 vert. Glorified (but still epic) sled hill on the bottom with some trees up top and some fun little drops in the middle. I was hoping to get some corn based on the warmer temps but "unskiable crap" as described above was about right. I take my kids there...to them it's "wilderness skiing". They stay on the open portion on the bottom. Anyway they had fun and we were in t shirts in the sun so all in all a good day.
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