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Are you happy with how you're skiing?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Curious about other instructors' opinions on how happy you are with your skiing. Looking more from a general perspective rather than on that one steep, icy bump run last Tuesday.

 

If you are happy with your skiing, how long have you been happy with it? 

 

If you are unhappy with your skiing, what is it that you feel unhappy about, and how are you attempting to address it?

post #2 of 28

I'm feeling pretty darn good about it. I may be good, or I may be a bit delusional, but whichever one it is is working for me. I feel like I've been in a pretty good place for two or three years now.

 

I'd still like to make my left foot/leg work better though.

post #3 of 28
I don't know I'll ever be happy, but I am happier. I'm finally at a point where clinicians/examiners compliment me on my turns or how I do a task. At my home mountain, based on feedback I'm getting not just from the instructor staff but also the race staff, I'm either skiing well or there is a huge conspiracy happening to get me to think I am. All this started this year. Prior to that I had been complimented on my improvement and how much better I'm getting, but never that I was good at it.

I am still behind the curve in the bumps. I ski them better than I have been but I'm not good at it yet. I know what I need to do and most of that is to just rep it out to raise my confidence and muscle memory. I know when and how I mess up. I just need more experiences. My brain owns it but my body doesn't ... yet.

I have roughly 5 more training days (not calendar) before the L2 skiig exam. Most of those days will be spent in the bumps and the rest going through the rest of the tasks. After that I'll let you know if the examiners are happy with my skiing too tongue.gif

Ken
post #4 of 28

I'm not at all happy with my skiing at all. I thought I was doing fairly well during the year based on feedback from several L3's I had been working with. Formal feedback from my Cert clinician's at the beginning of the season was OK. The results from the final formal review session said I was not ready for the L2 exam so I did a video clinic on exam weekend. This was the first time I was ever saw myself on video and WOW am I bad! It justified my Cert clinician's scores. The video showed I have some kind of tic going on with the right foot at turn initiation where I brush it a little to get it on edge, essentially I'm doing a wedge turn. Left foot is OK. I've been balanced and stanced and have foot beds so it's not an equipment issue but that will all be reviewed to make certain something hasn't changed.

The thing I'm most unhappy about is no one told me this during the entire season specially my Cert clinicians. So, I've been reinforcing a bad habit all season while some people are telling me I'm skiing close to an L2 standard. My Cert clinicians just said I was not to standard but did not provide instruction on how to improve. The video clinician did more for my skiing in two days than my mentors did all season.

At least now I know where I stand and what I need to work on. And you can believe video will be a large part of my regimen next season.

post #5 of 28

I think that question largely stems upon whether an instructor has recently seen themselves ski on video which doesn't seem to happen very often. Once they finally get zoom panning on Iphones, this will change dramatically.

post #6 of 28

Overall I'm happy, although I always have something I'm tinkering with. I have realized that the moment I say "Okay, I'm all set" is the moment that the bad habits start to creep back in and things become a mess again. So I never settle, but I'm overall pretty pleased with my skiing. 

post #7 of 28

I'm always happy when I am skiing, and I can always be a better skier.  As an instructor I find it essential to try to sift the chaff of This Season's Fad from the wheat of good foundational moves.  There often seems to be a lot of re-labeling to the end of more confusion, and the fad is about calling something ABC this season when 5 years ago it was called DEF, but pretending that ABC is newer insight and thus better.  I find when I focus on basics I get more skiing dividends, and when I focus on Hot New Topic I get confused, but that probably speaks more to my own perspective than anything else.

post #8 of 28

Yes, relatively happy. Video confirms a lot of what I've been working on.

 

Still working on more. It's a work in progress. Moving in the right direction.

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkuphill View Post
 

I'm always happy when I am skiing, and I can always be a better skier.  As an instructor I find it essential to try to sift the chaff of This Season's Fad from the wheat of good foundational moves.  There often seems to be a lot of re-labeling to the end of more confusion, and the fad is about calling something ABC this season when 5 years ago it was called DEF, but pretending that ABC is newer insight and thus better.  I find when I focus on basics I get more skiing dividends, and when I focus on Hot New Topic I get confused, but that probably speaks more to my own perspective than anything else.

That is both nicely written and well said enough to find no chaff upon sifting. The importance of separating the non-functional residual of meaningless re-marketing of terms and concepts from basic fundamentals, many currently present  while dating further back than Stenmark, is a huge key to reaching that next stage in expert skiing. The best example of this is how one of the very first things we learn as a skier, "keeping forward" [or what ever your preferred terms, I like "maintaining offensive calm (CoM)"], is probably one of the top three, if not the most significant, individual essential principals of skiing technique that most all accomplished racers focus on regularly. Being 6"4" and 210 lbs., I simply cannot afford to dick around with anything other than the very basic fundamentals anytime I wish to ski in a manner where certain risk and repercussions exist. God forbid anyone is in my trajectory upon losing my platform at the bottom of a turn while skiing fast. Honestly, I'd rather it be another skier than a tree. Anyway, at the risk of sounding macho (which I am but is besides the point), I only include this as it has always represented as quite a heavy bitch slap across the face whenever I ignore my fundamentals at the wrong moment and resulting in my head spinning in full rotations. I refer to this experience as a technical "exorcism" also for the immediacy with which it results in the requisite attitude adjustment. Now ... when I am skiing the non-steep/non-icy, I like to mess around with all kinds of slap-happy BS. As an example is what I refer to as a double pole plant gangster turn, a look only enhanced by the simultaneous firing of a spray of rounds from a tommy-gun into a row of cafes and restaurants across the street, slope, whatever. At least the kids go for it. Yes, fundamentals ...


Edited by Rich666 - 3/10/15 at 10:02am
post #10 of 28

Someone once asked the great cellist Pablo Casals  why he still practiced everyday at age 86 and he answered, "because I think I am making progress".   Besides, it's not the destination but the journey.  YM

post #11 of 28

Love the plateau.  Chop wood and carry water.  

post #12 of 28

Yes, very happy with it, but I've always been happy with it, even years ago when I now know I really really sucked at it.

post #13 of 28
A statement I read in Buddhist book: I'm perfect but there's always room for improvement.
post #14 of 28

Mostly yes! Sometimes no.

post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Love the plateau.  Chop wood and carry water.  

What does that mean?

post #16 of 28
Sometimes... I mean I have my moments. It's all an ongoing experiment.
post #17 of 28

Happy, but never satisfied.

 

That is one thing I love about skiing, it does not matter if you are Marcel Hirscher or a first year skier, there is always something that you can improve. 

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

What does that mean?


Zen proverb.

 

The other is from George Leonard.

post #19 of 28

I'm happy with my skiing except in bumps and trees.

 

However after being watched and evaluated by an Examiner I am consistently unhappy.

 

However I finally figured out how to change that.

 

Stop being evaluated by them!

 

 

 

This isn't a performance art, I'm not doing it for an audience, I'm doing it for myself.

post #20 of 28
feels better than last year, but every time I see video I am less happy... rolleyes.gif I keep working on it... keep reading and re-reading tons, masters training, PD days, new courses and levels, find better coaches to coach camps with, find better guys to ski with, challenge myself (on our hills if you dont challenge yourself, you plateau instantly) on course or otherwise. Keep trying different movements and different movement patterns, see what comes out. keep switching skis and boots - each feels different and throws you off.

engraining

video, video, video. self MA and some MA here...

cheers
post #21 of 28

I'm really happy that I don't ski like I used to, and I look forward to getting better. 

post #22 of 28
I am happy with my skiing, but definitely not satisfied!
post #23 of 28

I read the book  Inner Skiing   a couple of times 25 years ago.  The thing I got from the book was that, criticizing your own progress does little good.   Being too critical is of little benefit.  Create a plan for improvement and implement the plan.  You will learn as quickly as your talent will allow.  I have often heard that the best in the world have the best races on he days that they go out and have fun.   YM

post #24 of 28
I always say I was the best skier, in my mind's eye, the day before I went to my first instructor hiring clinic 27 years ago. Ever since, I have been striving to improve, often unsatisified with my progrees and sometimes very happy with my progress, but never satisfied with my skiing. There is always room for improvement; and that is what keeps me skiing. This very afternoon, after skiing, I said to my wife "if I ever become satisfied with my skiing, I will probably no longer be interested in skiing". Every day that I ski I have a focus; that is why I can go to clinc after clinic, or ski day after day after day, often by myself, and enjoy every minute of it. The quest for excellence is never ending. I really feel sorry for those poor souls who ski along thinking that they are "the cream of the crop", not realizing that there is always another plateau.
post #25 of 28

I am usually happy with my skiing if I am showing improvement either technically, tactically, or athletically. I like to keep pushing my own envelope. When I stagnate, or worse, regress, I am not pleased with how I'm skiing. These days, I find that sometimes it is as difficult to simply not regress as it is to progress. That's my story.

 

Really though, if I'm skiing, I'm happy.


Edited by HeluvaSkier - 3/14/15 at 9:26am
post #26 of 28
I've been skiing happily since the 1940s. I'm happy I skied better this season than last. I'm happy my skiing has improved almost every season since I started down the ski bum instructor road in 1970. I wish my Achilles hadn't given up the ghost seven weeks ago, but I'm having fun working with some of the Ski & Ride support crew. I'll be happy to get back on the snow next fall, when I expect the improvement I was getting last January to come flooding back and start rushing forward. I KNOW there's always room for improvement. Everybody I know who's good at skiing says they're working on something.
post #27 of 28

No matter how well you ski there is always keeping up with the evolution of ski technique.   Lots of work to be done.   Ski with a smile.  YM

post #28 of 28

Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Love the plateau.  Chop wood and carry water.  

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

What does that mean?

 

 It also means "wipe on, wipe off".

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