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Dolomiti Superski

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Just returned from a week in Italy.  Besides being extraordinarily beautiful,  it was huge.  12 resorts interconnected and 1200km of trails and slopes.  Everywhere we looked were more slopes and more lifts.  Dry year but the prepared trails were in good shape.    Would head back there in a flash.  Skied the downhill run  at St Christina/ val gardena and skied the GS/SL trail in Alta Badia.    YM

post #2 of 17

Got pics?

post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

Just returned from a week in Italy.  Besides being extraordinarily beautiful,  it was huge.  12 resorts interconnected and 1200km of trails and slopes.  Everywhere we looked were more slopes and more lifts.  Dry year but the prepared trails were in good shape.    Would head back there in a flash.  Skied the downhill run  at St Christina/ val gardena and skied the GS/SL trail in Alta Badia.    YM


Did you book your trip through a tour company or do it yourself?

 

I have a friend who's going there in three weeks on her honeymoon.  They haven't made any arrangements yet.

post #4 of 17
The food is amazing, we stayed in Selva at Iris. Amazing views and history in the area. Booked it ourselves, and loved our trip.
The skiing is mostly piste and busy at the Sella Ronde connections.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 


Did you book your trip through a tour company or do it yourself?

 

I have a friend who's going there in three weeks on her honeymoon.  They haven't made any arrangements yet.

Two great places to stay [ limited nightlife ]

 

http://www.hotelmalita.it/en/

 

http://www.hotellupobianco.it/

 

If they want nightlife then choose a hotel in Selva.

post #6 of 17
We stayed in Cortina at the Hotel Menardi. Cortina was far less crowded than Arabba/Sella Ronda. Beautiful mountains and valley!
post #7 of 17

Great ski area, lots of history, natural beauty, great food, culture and people. 

It is easy to book trip on your own, go to valgardena.it and contact tourist office with your dates. They will run daily search of available accommodations and will let you know what is available. Little bit of "footwork" but huge savings, it is fairly simple to book. I would recommend hotels with 3* and up, they usually have hot tub, jacuzzi, sauna facilities (smallish side). Ortisei/St. Ulrich is bigger town with Selva being deepest in the valley but with access to most skiing areas due to its central location on Sella Ronda circuit. 

This area has reputation for "mellow"(intermediate) skiing. While it is mostly true, some of the toughest terrain could be found in Dolomites. Even Selva has some serious skiing - off the beaten path of Sella Ronda and all lift accessible.  

 

Personally, one of the best days of my skiing life was at the beginner terrain in Selva, while the storm was raging higher up, I had blast "teaching" myself how to ski "switch" and riding "button" lifts. 

post #8 of 17

We returned from that region - our second trip - just over two weeks ago.  We spent the first week being guided by friends of ours who guide for Dolomites Ski Tours - an Australian operation of about 25 years standing operating out of the Val di Fassa (Canazei and Campitello). We spent the second week staying at Villa Tony, which is in Corvara in the Alta Badia region.  Villa Tony offers half board (breakfast each morning and dinner each night) and, like everywhere else in the region, the food's terrific.  In the middle we packed our bags and DST delivered them to Villa Tony.  We just skied around to Corvara on Saturday afternoon to join another group of friends and our bags were in the room.  Magic!

 

I have a trip report underway, again, but it's a few days away yet.

 

It doesn't matter which town you choose for accommodation in and around the Sella Ronda, they all access similar slopes on the Dolomiti Superpass.  With 450 (maybe 460 by now) lifts available on the one pass, and 1,200km (or so) of piste groomed each and every night, the whole region is up for grabs.  You can spend the entire week and hardly replay the same slopes.  During this last trip I skied 13 days (one of them was just two runs).  Over that time I hit 212 lifts and 99 of those lifts were unique.

 

By my experience Arraba is one of the colder towns in the area.  It's in the shadow of the Marmolada Glacier and the sun disappears very early each afternoon.  By comparison Alta Badia receives sunlight later into the afternoon; it's lighter for longer, warmer as a result, less icy, and you can still access the Arraba slopes.  From Corvara we hit first lifts on the Boe gondola to ski over the landscape through the Arraba area and still made it past the cable car station to the tiny village of Sottoguda by 10:00am.

 

If you stay on piste you won't find 'challenging' skiing.  Not by any means.  What the Dolomites does provide is a succession of utterly beautiful vistas at every turn (literally every turn), terrific, long greens and blues, plus the odd black groomer if you look for them.  You also have to deal with amazing food and wine with professional table service at each and every lunch stop.  It's a struggle, but someone has to do it.

 

Without giving too much away, here are a couple of sample shots from the area.  

 

A typical morning groomer above Alta Badia.

 

 

The view from Lagazuoi. 

 

 

Part of the Sella Massif, as seen from the Colfosco region on a windy Sunday afternoon.

 

 

The top of Colfosco.  Corvara is in the valley beyond the rifugio ... being a mountain hut.

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

 

Skiing down from Lagazuoi, above the Scotoni Hutte.  I've read somewhere it's rated one of the five most picturesque ski runs on earth. That's subjective, of course, but it's hard to argue with the nomination.

 

 

From the above valley it's an uphill push back to the nearest slopes.  The gypsies are happy to drag you out of the valley behind a horse drawn sleigh.  2 euros the trip.

 

 

 

The mountains above the town of San Cassiano, taken from a gondola in the Alta Badia area.

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

 

 

Skiing into Corvara from the Alta Badia hills in the afternoon.

 

 

Dolomites Ski Tours operates on the far side of the Sella Ronda, about 20km away.  It's all still accessible by lifts though.

 

The Belvedere region on a dull, misty day.

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

 

The top of Passo Pordoi, which links the Belvedere region above Val di Fassa with Arabba.

 

 

The town of Campitello in the Val di Fassa, as seen from the Belvedere slopes  Access to the Belvedere area each morning is via cable car.

 

 

And, lastly for now, the top station of the Col Rodella cable car above Campitello can be seen across the valley in this shot.

 

 

Bob, please fell free to get in touch via PM if your friend would like to chat.  There are some areas that are easily accessed, but tough to find if you're new to the region.

 

[edited for spelling]


Edited by sinbad7 - 3/11/15 at 2:39am
post #9 of 17

Yogaman - you  need to elaborate - you are an Expert skier that is - "Shiffrin's tips" redux ; did you hit any of the Couloirs - the legendary Val Mezdi route, Canale Joel/Holzer ? Were they open, I heard on this forum, most liklely not open..We chose not to go there as we are going in April 1st because of snow issues and many parts of Sella Ronda circuit passes may close by then. Sinbad - beautiful dude/dudette(?) - and same query above for you. Awaiting TR absolutely details please 

post #10 of 17

Thanks Sinbad for those pics and the trip report. They bought back many happy memories of days I spent blasting round the Sella Ronde and down the Marmolada. I almost always stayed in the Malita in Arraba as the owner is a fellow Ducati nut.

post #11 of 17

Quiet suggestion - this thread really belongs in the International Zone or Trip Report, many will miss it ... I think, and it should not be missed!

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 


Did you book your trip through a tour company or do it yourself?

 

I have a friend who's going there in three weeks on her honeymoon.  They haven't made any arrangements yet.


Went with a ski club.  Ski club did the arrangements.  Snow down 75% from last year.  Virtually no off piste as snow was limited and old.  However, prepared trails in great shape.  YM

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post
 

Yogaman - you  need to elaborate - you are an Expert skier that is - "Shiffrin's tips" redux ; did you hit any of the Couloirs - the legendary Val Mezdi route, Canale Joel/Holzer ? Were they open, I heard on this forum, most liklely not open..We chose not to go there as we are going in April 1st because of snow issues and many parts of Sella Ronda circuit passes may close by then. Sinbad - beautiful dude/dudette(?) - and same query above for you. Awaiting TR absolutely details please 

 

  Mostly skied with SO that is a level 6 skier so mostly  kept her under my wing.  No couloirs on this trip in part due to very low snow.  Had the snow come, I would have hired a guide and gotten to more off piste.  Something for everyone there.  Got off the Campinoi lift just before high winds pushed a large tree onto the lift rope.  200 people had to be rescued.  Back up and running next day.  Next trip be sure and try the  "Bombinino"  mixed drink.   Like always some of the areas had better snow than others.  My SO was awestruck by the enormity of the area and the beauty.    YM

post #14 of 17

The beauty is mind-bending, space-time warp! Thanks, Sinbad for the pics, Yogaman-you should post some too.

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 


Snow down 75% from last year.  Virtually no off piste as snow was limited and old.  However, prepared trails in great shape.  YM

 

Of course, last year was the best year for snow since (I think) the early-1950's.  Ridiculous amounts of snow.  Way more than is ever required.  The Marmolada glacier was closed for at least one (three week) period last year due to avalanche risk, and an avalanche took out one of the lifts on the way down to the cable car base station below the glacier.  

 

A friend sent me the following shot of the Passo Pordoi last year.

 

 

 

This year is certainly below average - as it is for much of the Alps.  I don't think the Val Mesdi has had sufficient cover at any stage.  You could ski down the front from the Pordoi cable car, but crossing the Sella to ski down into Colfosco, maybe not.  On the other hand the snow on piste was fantastic, and we managed to get in a powder day in the middle there.

post #16 of 17

On the other hand the forecast is for multiple feet of snow in the next few days.

post #17 of 17

Let's hope L'Espace Killy is getting dumped on!

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