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Solitude or Alta

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hey,

 

Got a small window to travel April 12. Ski 13-14 and fly back on a red eye early 15. I have snowboarded Solitude in SLC in the past, but at 40 I am switching back to skiing so I am probably an advanced beginner maybe even still an intermediate. I haven't skied since I was 22. Been snowboarding 10-12 days a year since I made the switch. 

 

I plan to take 1 1/2 days of lessons in an effort to advance quickly but I am unsure about Alta from a  terrain standpoint. For a 2 days I felt like Solitude was a bit limiting on a snowboard. Any thoughts? 

 

Breck is an other option but with my small travel window SLC seems like the better bet. 

post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beartooth View Post
 

Hey,

 

Got a small window to travel April 12. Ski 13-14 and fly back on a red eye early 15. I have snowboarded Solitude in SLC in the past, but at 40 I am switching back to skiing so I am probably an advanced beginner maybe even still an intermediate. I haven't skied since I was 22. Been snowboarding 10-12 days a year since I made the switch. 

 

I plan to take 1 1/2 days of lessons in an effort to advance quickly but I am unsure about Alta from a  terrain standpoint. For a 2 days I felt like Solitude was a bit limiting on a snowboard. Any thoughts? 

 

Breck is an other option but with my small travel window SLC seems like the better bet. 


If your question is whether or not Alta is a good place to learn to ski harder terrain (more than blue groomers), the answer is "yes".  However, the Supreme lift closes on April 12 so that limits the options for intermediate terrain.  The Alta Ski School is very good.  Friends who have taken group lessons in late season often end up as the only student or perhaps one other.  The full-time instructors with lots of experience are the ones who stay until the last day.

 

If you are interested in staying in one of the lodges at Alta, check out this thread:

http://www.epicski.com/t/125833/alta-lodges

 

FYI, I'll be at Alta Lodge that week with friends.  Happy to ski a few runs with you . . . assuming it's not a powder day.  When there is a late season snowstorm, the powder doesn't last long before it warms up.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

I am just trying to transition back to skiing and was curious if Alta had enough beginner to intermediate terrain for 2 days of skiing. I would like to take a lesson the first day and ski on my own the 2nd. I have always just been a cruiser and not a hard charger even on a board. Groomed blacks, blues, etc…Not sure about going back to skiing but I am old enough that clicking in and out of my bindings is getting tiresome. Plus my daughter is getting better on skis and would like to be able to ski with her has she gets older. 

 

I love the Alta Lodge dynamic. Community meals, etc…are appealing to me as a solo traveler. 

post #4 of 10

Alta has plenty of beginner/intermediate for two days IMO.

post #5 of 10

Either Solitude or Alta should have enough to keep you busy for a couple days, but since Solitude advertises its season as ending "Mid-April (Weather Permitting)," I'd be pretty leery about committing to Solitude for your dates.

 

Since you're looking at flying in on a Sunday, I'd suggest you consider taking advantage of the Alta Snowbird boarding pass program--a $54 ticket to both areas for Monday, 4/13. Take a half-day lesson Monday morning, then go across the ridgeline from the Sugarloaf lift and spend a couple hours on Snowbird's Mount Baldy lift... one high speed lift with phenomenal views and almost as much beginner/lower intermediate terrain as Alta. And then for Day 2, you can decide on skipping the lesson, taking a half-day, or taking a full day depending on how you're feeling--and you certainly shouldn't run out of fun at Alta if you take that afternoon at Snowbird.

post #6 of 10

Solitude has plenty of intermediate terrain, but very little beginner stuff.  Alta has more of both and will probably be the better bet at that time.

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beartooth View Post

I am just trying to transition back to skiing and was curious if Alta had enough beginner to intermediate terrain for 2 days of skiing. I would like to take a lesson the first day and ski on my own the 2nd. I have always just been a cruiser and not a hard charger even on a board. Groomed blacks, blues, etc…Not sure about going back to skiing but I am old enough that clicking in and out of my bindings is getting tiresome. Plus my daughter is getting better on skis and would like to be able to ski with her has she gets older. 



 



I love the Alta Lodge dynamic. Community meals, etc…are appealing to me as a solo traveler. 


 


Unless you are intent on only skiing each trail once, there is more than enough green/blue terrain at Alta for 2 days. For that matter, my daughter never got bored skiing Alta for a week before she was ready for the harder ungroomed terrain. That's because there are so many places for an intermediate to explore just off the groomed trails. If you are serious about learning to ski, it's better to ski on familiar trails instead of always looking for something new. I say that as someone who has become an advanced skier partially because I've been taking lessons and learned how to improve technique at a mountain that only has 75 skiable acres.

Can start on the Albion side on the Sunnyside and Cecret lifts. Head to the Supreme blues after that. Or Sugarloaf if it's good visibility and not that windy at the top.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Utah View Post

Either Solitude or Alta should have enough to keep you busy for a couple days, but since Solitude advertises its season as ending "Mid-April (Weather Permitting)," I'd be pretty leery about committing to Solitude for your dates.



 



Since you're looking at flying in on a Sunday, I'd suggest you consider taking advantage of the Alta Snowbird boarding pass program--a $54 ticket to both areas for Monday, 4/13. Take a half-day lesson Monday morning, then go across the ridgeline from the Sugarloaf lift and spend a couple hours on Snowbird's Mount Baldy lift... one high speed lift with phenomenal views and almost as much beginner/lower intermediate terrain as Alta. And then for Day 2, you can decide on skipping the lesson, taking a half-day, or taking a full day depending on how you're feeling--and you certainly shouldn't run out of fun at Alta if you take that afternoon at Snowbird.


 



I don't agree that the blues/green off the Mt Baldy lift are in any way equivalent to all the green/blues at Alta. A half-day is almost not enough to ski all the trails once off Sunnyside, Supreme, Sugarloaf, and Collins. Not to mention the fun run off the end of the Wildcat chair.
post #9 of 10

Just remembered the OP's dates are after the Supreme lift closes.  Still plenty of terrain off Sugarloaf and Collins for an advanced beginner or intermediate without going over to Snowbird.  Need to stay high if it's warm in any case.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 
Quote:

Snowbird's Mount Baldy lift... one high speed lift with phenomenal views and almost as much beginner/lower intermediate terrain as Alta.

 

I don't agree that the blues/green off the Mt Baldy lift are in any way equivalent to all the green/blues at Alta. A half-day is almost not enough to ski all the trails once off Sunnyside, Supreme, Sugarloaf, and Collins. Not to mention the fun run off the end of the Wildcat chair.

 

Agreed--but most of the blues at Alta aren't "lower intermediate" in my view. I'd say that everything below the Collins Angle Station and most of the other blues are fairly steep, as blue-marked runs go. Snowbird's Mount Baldy pod is a lot bigger than the Cecret pod at Alta, to be sure. And I do think that Alta (or Solitude, if it's open) will be enough to keep the OP busy--but I'd still say a trip over to Snowbird might be quite fun, and shouldn't cost much extra :)

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