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Bump and Shorts MA

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

I was hoping for some MA on a recent video I shot. Conditions on the groomer are icy and firm (no snow for about a month). Bumps are softer and slightly wind blown. Both slopes are black and steep, groomer is the Mens Fall Away pitch at Lake Louise. I'm aiming at some point to be as good as the guys on the demo team, so that would be the overall goal. 

Thanks in advance. 

 

 

post #2 of 16
Nice Roland.

Teach me how to ski bumps like that!biggrin.gif

Working on my shorts too. My aspirations are not quite as lofty however.

Actually don't think my knees would survive so just kidding. I prefer a softer approach to bumps.

I like the rhythm and flow.. Love the functional air and playfulness. Great control and obvious precision in guiding those skis through the turn even when when you no longer have snow contact.

I think I want to slow down the vid a little. Lots of good stuff going on. Something about that POP when your skis drop into the troughs might be something that I might be looking at.
post #3 of 16

You GOT it Rollo!

 

I like it, especially this one...

 

 

Looks like fun.

 

That's technical mogul skiing imo.

 

The shorts look good too.

 

The only thing I see is your left hand tends to drop and back, that will slow your turn down when it gets steeper, there's always room for improvement.

 

Nail


Edited by Nailbender - 3/8/15 at 1:57am
post #4 of 16

I'm not much of a bump skier but that was def cool to watch. 

Just out of curiosity and in regards to mechanics, how tall are you?

post #5 of 16

good stuff good energy good versatility.  fun skiing

 

if i'm picking nits, I'd say keep the hand in front / don't let the arm wing open (as Nail mentions)

 

Greater range of absorbtion?   (may not have been your intent, so this may not be fair)

post #6 of 16

So after a second look, maybe a little softer absorption in the bumps would smooth out the flow without loosing the rhythm and flow.

 

Re: pole action, That looked a little abrupt as to me as well. Maybe instead of letting the reaction of the pole touch be a pop up with the hand, continue to direct the hand through the touch so it doesn't pop up but continues through in the direction of the turn and down the hill. (does that make sense?) Maintaining a little more discipline on those hands would probably tighten up your core a bit and clean up the look of those turns if that's part of your desire.

 

All in all those are great turns. Now we are just getting picky..

post #7 of 16
Rollo, great skiing as usual. Only one comment, and this is for the visuals since you're aspiring to d-team tryouts... A slightly more active inside leg so we see absolutely parallel shins (assuming your boot alignment is worked out, which I assume it is:) ). It's one of the things that is always spot on with Sebastien M and JF B.
post #8 of 16

that's great skiing - not easy to pick on things... one thing that I would say, especially if you compare to JF, is better absorbtion / flexing at the end of the turns, here's a more typical JF transition:

 

 

versus yours:

 

 

cheers

 

this may contribute to that occasional lazy inside leg Mark mentioned.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post
 

So after a second look, maybe a little softer absorption in the bumps would smooth out the flow without loosing the rhythm and flow.

 

Re: pole action, That looked a little abrupt as to me as well. Maybe instead of letting the reaction of the pole touch be a pop up with the hand, continue to direct the hand through the touch so it doesn't pop up but continues through in the direction of the turn and down the hill. (does that make sense?) Maintaining a little more discipline on those hands would probably tighten up your core a bit and clean up the look of those turns if that's part of your desire.

 

All in all those are great turns. Now we are just getting picky..

Have you had time to experiment with shorter poles? Are you making a conscious decision to pop the hands up vs open the wrists laterally for a blocking touch vs cocking the wrists with forward thumb movement for a more aggressive stability touch?

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Have you had time to experiment with shorter poles? Are you making a conscious decision to pop the hands up vs open the wrists laterally for a blocking touch vs cocking the wrists with forward thumb movement for a more aggressive stability touch?

I told my girlfriend that she should experiment with shorter poles right before she dumped me. Needless to say, I never found out if the advice was taken. 

post #11 of 16

@Rich666, how old are you?

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

@Rich666, how old are you?

Old enough to be your daddy.

 

Quick enough to beat him up the staircase.

 

Smart enough to go skiing instead.

 

Sounds like someone needs a dry pair of socks ...


Edited by Rich666 - 3/9/15 at 7:05pm
post #13 of 16

Gotta be pretty nit-picky to say much about this video, but....

 

Bumps - maybe absorb more. Not because there is anything wrong with what you are doing, but just to show that you can. Do you think the selectors for your team might think you are flying off every bump because you can't absorb? Or will they know it is by choice? I don't know what the standard is that you have there, but I'd want to make sure they can tell that you can do it either way at will.

 

Shorts - I think it would be nice to see the pole plant last a little longer. push through it instead of letting your hand come up. Like shifting from 2nd gear to 3rd and then hold it in 3rd don't let it come back to neutral.

post #14 of 16
Amazing skiin! Congratulations. I may only say that if you bring the tip of ski in contact with snow will also help absorb. I am getting older so I don't let my ski off the snow into the air.
post #15 of 16

First as everyone has said, great skiing, but you have a lot of work to get where you want to be.  

 

Technical:  You are getting variations in your stance width through transition, this tells me you are out of balance and unable to release effectively.  This is because you are pushing at the finish to shape the bottom of your turns.  This put you back and inside and unable to release the ski from a balanced position.  It also reduces the amount of absorption you have in your legs, causing you to get kicked around a bit bit the terrain.  It is better on the groomed short turns and the middle bump section but the move is still there.  Allow your feet to come out form underneath you more through the apex of the turn.  Also think about edging the ski before turn the ski as well as bending the front of the ski to shape the top of the turn rather than turning your feet. This will build bigger edge angles into the apex which in turn will build pressure earlier, and allow you to stay balanced for/aft. This will give your turns the snap and flow you are looking for while maintaining a consistent stance width because you are balanced through the whole turn.  

 

Tactical: You are letting the terrain dictate where you turn and turn shape.  You should be able to maintain a consistent turn radius regardless of the terrain in front of you.  This is the ultimate goal.  Practice by picking a radius and sticking with it throughout the entire run.  Better yet have someone else pick the radius. Then move to a variation where you do 3 turns and switch the radius, another 3 and switch again. This will show you where your weaknesses are and what your go to moves are.  At this level any variation in line or radius should be by choice not because terrain dictates it.

post #16 of 16
I agree with Loki

This is very fun skiing and im sure many peers will watch in awe and aspire to ski like you. However you can be even better. This skiing definitely requires a lot of athleticism to pull off. And you risk injuring yourself eventually from pouncing around in the bumps so much. As you get older this approach is going to get difficult and physically dangerous. I used to ski the bumps like that a decade ago and then I squashed a disc, went through surgery and recovery which took a very longtime, then I retooled myself and learned to ski the bumps smoothly; and I think much much better.

What I see is that you don't have a good release. You are absorbing quite a lot but watch your head go up and down, you're not really absorbing as much as you could. Partly that is because you are actually using the bump vaulting to unweight you so you can pivot the skis a lot in the air and land someplace with hard edge setting and speed control in the last 1/3 of the turn.

I'd like to see you develop rounder turns without head bobbing. In order to do that you should learn to crossover while deeply flexing to absorb. Learn to engage your new edges on the downhill side of your skis as you flex the deepest and crossover at the same time. Get edge purchase WAY sooner and a rounder turn shape.

That in turn will enable you to stop with the airborne pivoting that you are relying on now. Without having to unweight and pivot, you will be able to more fully absorb each bump and begin every turn with edge engagement and pressure starting right from the crest of the bump. Yes sometimes you will go a bit airborne anyway and certainly your rotary skills will come to play in those instances, but it will be greatly minimized and smooth out your bump skiing 10 fold if you learn to release and crossover to the new edges while deeply flexed, and seek edge engagement earlier with a rounder turn shape.
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