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How did you become a mountain transplant - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

Henry isn't always right, but when he's right, he's right:

 and more dogs. Dogs are nice.

Lol, exactly what I told my gf this morning!

post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

Its also worth mentioning that there is an in-between. There are towns/cities which are relatively close to the mountains, but not the mountain town itself. They offer easy access to the goods, but often have far more opportunity as far as jobs and other life stuff goes. Out west you're in a pretty easy spot. Denver, SLC, Reno as opposed to Vail, Park City or Truckee. In the east, the towns are smaller, but still a little more than the mountain towns themselves. Burlington VT, Manchester NH, Portland ME as opposed to Stowe, Killington or North Conway.

Just another thought. 

Yup I am another in betweener...moved from living in Boston to southern NH so I feel I struck a balance that satisfies wife and kids needs...with 30 mins to great skiing options...within 2 hours of the bigger mountains. But in my case it was about striking a balance
post #33 of 49

I am trying to figure this one out myself.  We live at the beach in So Cal and I ski 6 hours away at Mammoth.  The drive blows.  So what to do?  Honestly, the weather at my place is really hard to beat in the winter.  Not sure I could do winter for 5-6 months.  And then there is surfing, love to surf as much as I do skiing.

Trying to figure out where in the world can I be an hour or two away from skiing and still close to surfing?????

post #34 of 49

A 6 hr drive from mammoth is better than a 6 hour drive from Snowshoe...fwiw

post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post
 

I am trying to figure this one out myself.  We live at the beach in So Cal and I ski 6 hours away at Mammoth.  The drive blows.  So what to do?  Honestly, the weather at my place is really hard to beat in the winter.  Not sure I could do winter for 5-6 months.  And then there is surfing, love to surf as much as I do skiing.

Trying to figure out where in the world can I be an hour or two away from skiing and still close to surfing?????

There is a different option: earn a ton of money, buy/lease a plane and hire a pilot. Problem solved with a bit of panache.

 

Option 3: move to Southern Maine, the surfing can be really good all winter, the weather? Not as much. Look what you are missing:

(photo from Nantucket not Maine, but you get an idea of NE winter surfing)

 

Check out the photo gallery here, it's pretty cool: http://www.theinertia.com/surf/half-frozen-and-firing-february-surfing-in-nantucket/?pid=25082

post #36 of 49

^^^^Too funny.  I was just looking at airplanes to fly from San Diego to Bishop.  Get me a nice Mooney for less than $100k and be there in 2 hours:D

post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

I am trying to figure this one out myself.  We live at the beach in So Cal and I ski 6 hours away at Mammoth.  The drive blows.  So what to do?  Honestly, the weather at my place is really hard to beat in the winter.  Not sure I could do winter for 5-6 months.  And then there is surfing, love to surf as much as I do skiing.
Trying to figure out where in the world can I be an hour or two away from skiing and still close to surfing?????
Vancouver.

My dilemna, if I have one, is that my significant other is a passionate gardener, and there's a lot on her 10 acres an hour north of Seattle that won't grow in a mountain town. She's pretty attached to the place after 28 years. I suppose I have to wait until she's ready to downsize, then figure out in which mountain-ish town she can have the fun with a growing season.

Hmm. Maybe we need to move to Vancouver.
post #38 of 49

Not sure if this qualifies, but I live at 2500 feet on the slopes of Haleakala in Maui. No sking, but the mountain is over 10,000 feet, so certainly qualifies as a mountain. Made the move from Texas (where there are no mountains) when I was young and before I got saddled with too many responsibilities like kids, mortgage and a business. Definitely think it helps to make the move when you're young. But as some people have noted, there are other ways. and times to do it as well. As other people have also noted, people live where they want to live. If you want to make it happen, you can, but usually requires significant effort.  But there are definitely rewards. 

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post


You ever thought of just reinventing yourself? There are very few "careers" in mountain towns but if you are willing to work "jobs" you can survive just fine and live a perfectly comfortable life. You will likely never be rich with money in a mountain town but you will be rich in many other ways which are priceless. I was lucky enough to be born to some transplants and grow up in a place I now consider paradise. I'll always be thankful to my parents for making that choice and the sacrifices it took and I know they have no regrets.

 

This is kind of my thoughts. If you are willing to take a hit in your income and redefine success, it becomes a lot easier to live in a mountain town.

 

My wife got off the front range by having a profession (teacher) that existed in mountain towns (much like nurse).  She got the job, took the pay cut, and moved. To follow her, I convinced my company I could work from home.

 

My wife's first job fizzled out, so we moved again to the Durango area.  This time around her job is going great, I expect to be unemployed by years-end. But, we are rooted- the move is done, the house is bought, and we can just barely pay the mortgage with 1 income while I go about figuring out what to do for money.

 

Meanwhile, we both have a big pile of friends that would do "anything" to live in the mountains- anything except letting any part of their current life go.

post #40 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

This is kind of my thoughts. If you are willing to take a hit in your income and redefine success, it becomes a lot easier to live in a mountain town.

 

My wife got off the front range by having a profession (teacher) that existed in mountain towns (much like nurse).  She got the job, took the pay cut, and moved. To follow her, I convinced my company I could work from home.

 

My wife's first job fizzled out, so we moved again to the Durango area.  This time around her job is going great, I expect to be unemployed by years-end. But, we are rooted- the move is done, the house is bought, and we can just barely pay the mortgage with 1 income while I go about figuring out what to do for money.

 

Meanwhile, we both have a big pile of friends that would do "anything" to live in the mountains- anything except letting any part of their current life go.

Reinventing myself at the age of 50 in a mountain town is very difficult.

I am sorry to hear about your difficulties and probable loss of job, hope it all works out, somehow it always does!

Unfortunately it always comes down to money. If I could find the financial solution, I'd pack-up tonight.

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damavand View Post
 

Reinventing myself at the age of 50 in a mountain town is very difficult.

I am sorry to hear about your difficulties and probable loss of job, hope it all works out, somehow it always does!

Unfortunately it always comes down to money. If I could find the financial solution, I'd pack-up tonight.

 

*shrug* the job thing will work out. The only question is how poor we will be.

 

I think a lot of people pine away for living in the mountains, but also want everything to fall into their lap with no sacrifice and no risk, and unfortunately, it doesn't tend to work that way.

post #42 of 49

Another solution would be to live and maximize your income and limit expenses in the city to set up an early retirement in mountains. If you start at 30 there is no reason by 40 you couldn't be in a paid off mountain home with enough income to sustain a good enjoyable lifestyle without the need to work. That's the approach I would probably recommend. Why live like a schmuck and barely get by when you can live like a king???? Small sacrifices early lead to big financial results.

post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

*shrug* the job thing will work out. The only question is how poor we will be.

 

I think a lot of people pine away for living in the mountains, but also want everything to fall into their lap with no sacrifice and no risk, and unfortunately, it doesn't tend to work that way.


This!  the reality is that except in a very few cases, for those of us who live in the mountains we make sacrifices either in terms of income or accepting other compromises.  In my case it means when I am working it is typically getting up at 3 am to get on a plane at crack of sparrow fart on Monday morning and getting home very late on a Thursday, and spending 3 nights away. To me that is the compromise I am prepared to accept to be able to live where I want to be.   It comes down to "pick your personal poison/sacrifice" that fits your desired blend of acceptable /compromise if you really want to do it.  


Edited by ScotsSkier - 3/11/15 at 2:27pm
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post


This!  the reality is that except in a very few cases, for those of us who live in the mountains we make sacrifices either in terms of income or accepting other compromises.  In my case it means when I am working it is typically getting up at 3 am to get on a plane at crack of sparrow fart on Monday morning and getting home very late on a Thursday, and spending 3 nights away. To me that is the compromise I am prepared to accept to be able to live where I want to be.   It comes down to "pick your personal poison/sacrifice" that fits your desired blend of acceptable /compromise if you really want to do it.  

Mine was to pick a smaller mountain closer to home mostly because we cleared the land and built the house, then got into skiing. I'm fortunate to be only 35 minutes away from the mountain and 40 minutes away from my work. I think about retiring in to the big mountains but I reasly like my little mountain and the people there. If the people change, maybe I'll change my mind.

If my wife gets her way, we'll be retiring to somewhere in CA. nonono2.gif
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post


Mine was to pick a smaller mountain closer to home mostly because we cleared the land and built the house, then got into skiing. I'm fortunate to be only 35 minutes away from the mountain and 40 minutes away from my work. I think about retiring in to the big mountains but I reasly like my little mountain and the people there. If the people change, maybe I'll change my mind.

If my wife gets her way, we'll be retiring to somewhere in CA. nonono2.gif

 

Somewhere like Mammoth CA is where I would recommend.:D

post #46 of 49

^^^^^I would give that move a few years to see how the weather sorts itself out.  If CA continues the drought it has been in for the last 4 years, I would look elsewhere.  Mammoth and Tahoe may be toast if the Global Warmingz keep CA warm.

post #47 of 49

For me it was always a matter of "where, when and how" but not "if".

 

I fell in love with the Rockies in the early 80's long before I finally became a skier in 2001. Made several trips to CO in the summers back then and knew it was where I wanted to be.

 

I spent most of my life in the South Jersey/Philly area and once I became a skier and started taking 3-4 Western trips every winter (mostly CO but also UT, ID and CA), it was just a matter of time. For me, skiing was always about the quality of snow and lack of crowds, and my timing in the East was never too good in those areas.

 

Then I finally met the right partner, and as she tells people " we discovered Durango on the internet" and within two years we were here. This was the only part of the Rockies I wasn't familiar with at that point, but it didn't take long to realize this could be home. And it didn't hurt that we were both able to find somewhat comparable jobs here, as it's not a cheap place to live by any means.

post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by William Tell View Post
 

For me it was always a matter of "where, when and how" but not "if".

 

I fell in love with the Rockies in the early 80's long before I finally became a skier in 2001. Made several trips to CO in the summers back then and knew it was where I wanted to be.

 

I spent most of my life in the South Jersey/Philly area and once I became a skier and started taking 3-4 Western trips every winter (mostly CO but also UT, ID and CA), it was just a matter of time. For me, skiing was always about the quality of snow and lack of crowds, and my timing in the East was never too good in those areas.

 

Then I finally met the right partner, and as she tells people " we discovered Durango on the internet" and within two years we were here. This was the only part of the Rockies I wasn't familiar with at that point, but it didn't take long to realize this could be home. And it didn't hurt that we were both able to find somewhat comparable jobs here, as it's not a cheap place to live by any means.

 

Good to hear. Now, are you a Rockies and Broncos fan now or still Phillies and E-A-G-L-E-S! ? 

post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by William Tell View Post
 

For me it was always a matter of "where, when and how" but not "if".

 

I fell in love with the Rockies in the early 80's long before I finally became a skier in 2001. Made several trips to CO in the summers back then and knew it was where I wanted to be.

 

I spent most of my life in the South Jersey/Philly area and once I became a skier and started taking 3-4 Western trips every winter (mostly CO but also UT, ID and CA), it was just a matter of time. For me, skiing was always about the quality of snow and lack of crowds, and my timing in the East was never too good in those areas.

 

Then I finally met the right partner, and as she tells people " we discovered Durango on the internet" and within two years we were here. This was the only part of the Rockies I wasn't familiar with at that point, but it didn't take long to realize this could be home. And it didn't hurt that we were both able to find somewhat comparable jobs here, as it's not a cheap place to live by any means.

 

Good to hear. Now, are you a Rockies and Broncos fan now or still Phillies and E-A-G-L-E-S! ?

Hey Phil!

You know better....no love here for the CO teams. I still bleed Eagles green and try and go see the Phillies play when they get out this way.

Come and visit us some day my man, you're always welcome.

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