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Average days before pair of modern skis wear out - Page 2

Poll Results: How many days before your typical modern skis lose their camber and life?

 
  • 0% (0)
    1-19
  • 0% (0)
    20-39
  • 0% (0)
    40-59
  • 14% (3)
    60-79
  • 4% (1)
    80-99
  • 42% (9)
    100-124
  • 4% (1)
    125-149
  • 23% (5)
    150-199
  • 0% (0)
    200-249
  • 0% (0)
    250-299
  • 9% (2)
    300+
21 Total Votes  
post #31 of 40
Depends..........on how much you suck.
post #32 of 40

If your skis start losing their performance, you might want to look at the bindings. Slop in the binding itself and the binding mount. If its warm out, boots get softer as well. If had my boots totally fold on me during very warm days.

post #33 of 40
I do my own tuning, my 4y/o volkl kendo's have over 100 day's, never been to shop for tuning, they don't feel any different then my new kendo's. The AC40's before the kendo's had well over 130 day's and skied great. They were stone ground twice.

I'm 195lbs 5'11", ski groomers, bumps, trees. Take air from time to time.
post #34 of 40

I'd think where they're stored is a factor.  Storing them in a hot shed or garage will likely shorten the lifespan of the materials and glues they're made of.  Regardless, 100 hard days is a reasonable expectation for most skis that have been well maintained.  Race skis that get hot boxed and frequent grinds might be closer to half of that before it is time to demote them to training skis or just replace them entirely.

post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

I'd think where they're stored is a factor.  Storing them in a hot shed or garage will likely shorten the lifespan of the materials and glues they're made of.  

do you know that for a fact--can you give a source re the heat degradation of the glues and materials and can you specify at what temperature failure or long term deterioration might occur? 

post #36 of 40

Definitely depends.  Three layers of steel and wood core with a light skier can last hundreds of days.

If you ski a lot of ice and hardpack,  and keep your skis sharp, the edges will be gone long before you have to worry about it on a high performance ski.

Foam core skis (back in the day) about 30 to 50 days, depending on usage and quality.

Colorado Volants delamination after about 5 years, but that's repairable.

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

do you know that for a fact--can you give a source re the heat degradation of the glues and materials and can you specify at what temperature failure or long term deterioration might occur? 


I used to work in a laminate furniture studio.  We used head guns to UN laminate things when we need to redo something.  I've also seen a couple pairs of skis come out of a shed or garage in a hot part of the country with delamination evident that wasn't apparent when I put them in there. 

 

Also, boots weaken under heat exposure for sure.  Think of it this way... heat excites the molecules that the materials are made of and gets them moving around.  That is why they get softer when heated up. That is why your boots are easier to put on when warm.  That is why ski bases suck in more wax better at higher temperatures in a hot box.  However, the excited state that the heat produces is also similar to what happens when you bend a piece of metal (or anything) back and forth.  The more you do it the weaker it gets over time.  Long exposure to hot temps breaks down most materials.  It makes sense to store plastics in climate controlled places whenever possible.

post #38 of 40
As an interesting aside, most epoxies stiffen with age. We tested a couple old (under performing) water skis and were surprised to find they were stiffer. We decided that the skis just got stale. New skis were good because they were new - not structurally better. (Note that most water skis are foam core and rather stiff and don't break down much).

Wood is a complex composite. When I built wood water skis, they changed a lot with time. Perhaps the wood cores are responsible for a real change in performance. Like an old tennis racquet, store your skis in a press?

Or buy a properly engineered foam core ski. My old foam core Goodes still rock after years of stress in the bumps.

Eric
post #39 of 40

Interesting about epoxy. Wonder if that's part of why skis start feeling "dead?"

 

You know more about foam that I do, but my impression from looking at helmet articles is that it ages rapidly, changes structural characteristics by 3-5 years after molding. No?

post #40 of 40
Beyond, it really depends on the foam. Urethane foam does degrade under load. PVC foam holds up much better. I was initially bummed when Clark Foam went out of business some years ago (the largest supplier of urethane surfboard foam and my source for my water skis). But the PVC foam I switched to is so much better. It lasts pretty much indefinitely.

Helmet foam is a different application. It needs to flex and is way more exposed to environmental stress. And possibly cost driven away from the longest life option. Except for the memory foam seats in my airplane (which have lasted decades) I don't have experience with flexible foam.

I think the cores change to make a ski feel dead. The core can degrade making the ski soft. The core can stretch or warp (especially wood) and change the rocker. The bond between the skins and the core can be comprised. The fibers in the skins can break or delaminate. Most dead skis are too soft - at least the epoxy isn't to blame. Maybe some skis do feel worse when they stiffen up? There are so many factors in a ski's performance.

Eric
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