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Any success self-molding Intuition liners on 1 year old boots?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I bought some Technica Ten.2 boots last year, and opted to forego the custom boot liners the shop was offering. My wife has the intuition wrap-around liners, which she really likes, but the boot-fitter only had Zipfit liners and they were pretty pricey. The base liners feel fine, but my toes are constantly numb in any weather below 20*. I'm thinking an upgrade to the Intuition liners will help, which raises a couple of questions:

 

1. Is it OK to change/upgrade liners in boots that are approximately 1 year old? I'm guessing they have about 20-30 days on them. I got them mid-way through last season, so not sure on the specifics. At the time, the boot-fitter said I could upgrade later, but would be less effective the longer I wait. 

 

2. Is this something I need to see another boot-fitter for, or is the molding something I can do myself? Has anyone here had success with self-molding these types of liners?

 

I don't mind going to the boot-fitter and paying for the expertise, if it's really necessary. But if the process is trivial and I can do it myself, I'd prefer to go that route.

post #2 of 18

I did my own in boots I'd had for a couple of years.  Worked well.

 

Intuition has good support and will guide you through the process.

post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyja View Post
 

1. Is it OK to change/upgrade liners in boots that are approximately 1 year old? I'm guessing they have about 20-30 days on them. I got them mid-way through last season, so not sure on the specifics. At the time, the boot-fitter said I could upgrade later, but would be less effective the longer I wait. 

 

Definitely! At the rate you're skiing, I bet you can get another four years out of that shell without having to buy another liner (after the Intuition). I replaced my stock liners with Intuitions after a 60 day season, and they've been great ever since (boots purchased in Dec 2010, liners in March 2011). 

 

Quote:
2. Is this something I need to see another boot-fitter for, or is the molding something I can do myself? Has anyone here had success with self-molding these types of liners?

 

I would see a reputable bootfitter. They will properly adjust your canting and alignment, and can make customizations to the liner to ensure it fits properly. Personally, I went to the Intuition warehouse in Vancouver to have my adjustments done and even choose the correct Intuition liner model. Given the number of days you'll be spending in these boots, it's worth having a professional do it. 

post #4 of 18

I replaced the stock liners in a 4 year old pair of Tecnica Diablo Pros with Intuition liners several years ago.  I only did it to get one more season out of the shells because I couldn't find any boots my size, 25.5, locally.  I didn't replace the stock liners with the wrap style because the boots were already too stiff for me and the wrap liners effectively increase the stiffness.  That is something you may wish to consider in deciding between a wrap liner and a tongue liner.

post #5 of 18

I'd recommend seeing a good bootfitter.  I had a pair of their Dreamliners, and I just had a friendly local shop heat them up a bit and then skied them.  Worked well for me, but I'm pretty lucky about tweaking things.

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
 

I'd recommend seeing a good bootfitter.  I had a pair of their Dreamliners, and I just had a friendly local shop heat them up a bit and then skied them.  Worked well for me, but I'm pretty lucky about tweaking things.

 

I was just looking at the Dreamliners on Intuition's website - they're billed as not requiring heat molding. I wonder if I could get away with buying the high volume versions from their site and throwing them in. Do you like yours?

post #7 of 18

Contact Intuition directly, they're very helpful.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyja View Post
 

 

I was just looking at the Dreamliners on Intuition's website - they're billed as not requiring heat molding. I wonder if I could get away with buying the high volume versions from their site and throwing them in. Do you like yours?


I had two good seasons with Dreamliners, and I agree with SkiMangoJazz that Intuition is pretty responsive.  Whether the Dreamliners or another product will work for you should probably be discussed with a boot fitter and/or Intuition. 

 

I heated mine up, which I believe helped mold them faster.  You could throw them in, but that was not my experience. That said, I saw the Dreamliners as about a 40-50 day solution for $125 (TGR group buy), and then moved on.  The other Intuition liners that require heat molding are thicker/more durable.

post #9 of 18

definitely give them a call to get the right model. The dreamliner is very roomy and may not work well if you have small or narrow feet.

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemesis256 View Post
 

definitely give them a call to get the right model. The dreamliner is very roomy and may not work well if you have small or narrow feet.


Agree; Dreamliner worked in my old boots because the boots were very close fitting and the Dreamliners were about as thick as my old, pushed in liner.  I would not use the Dreamliners in my current boot.  Every fit is different.

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
 


I had two good seasons with Dreamliners, and I agree with SkiMangoJazz that Intuition is pretty responsive.  Whether the Dreamliners or another product will work for you should probably be discussed with a boot fitter and/or Intuition. 

 

I heated mine up, which I believe helped mold them faster.  You could throw them in, but that was not my experience. That said, I saw the Dreamliners as about a 40-50 day solution for $125 (TGR group buy), and then moved on.  The other Intuition liners that require heat molding are thicker/more durable.

^^^ This, mostly. Didn't heat my MV Dreamliners, they competely molded in about 10 days. The packing out seems to have slowed, but I also have a hunch they'll be good for no more than 50-70 days. OTOH, did a superb job of molding to my weird bumps and protrusions without much drama, maybe a day or two of initial discomfort. So undecided about more in my future or something like the Luxury. Agree Intuition does a great job of accommodating, even down to not charging for swaps.

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hey, thanks all for the responses! I'll give them a call tomorrow. I'm leaning towards the the Powerwrap, given the durability and my wife's experience. I'll just need to make sure I get the right volume. The fit in my existing is pretty tight (I wear size 12.5 shoe, and they're 28 shells) with a wide last, so I'll either go low or mid volume. The heat molding looks pretty trivial, and I have plenty of uncooked rice at home.  

post #13 of 18

^^^ Great. I've owned both the Powerwrap, and now the Dreamliners. Keep in mind that the Powerwraps are the stiffest non-racing liner they make, it'll add about 8-10 flex points to your shells. If that's desired, all good. It's one reason so many touring guys want PW's; tech boots are notoriously soft. But if you like your shell's flex as is, suggest the tongued line, which IMO works better with on-piste alpine boots. As a reference point, even the Dreamliners (one of their "softer" models) are thicker and stiffer than my OE liners (for Lange RS130's). Also IME, the heat thing is more about allowing air space around your toes and using an insert than getting a stiffer (eg, denser) liner. 

post #14 of 18

While Intuitions may be stiffer than most liners that isn't invariably the case. My boots (Rossi Radical Pro's) which were advertised as 130 flex, whatever that means, had a relatively low front and relied on a very stiff tongue in the liner for the stiffness. I found the Powerwraps to be softer than the stock liners, to the point that I put back in the spine screws, both of which I had removed. 

post #15 of 18

The Dreamliner will have a looser heel than  Zipfits and a lot less material above the instep.     You can gain a lot of forefoot space with the Dreamliner, more than with the Zipfit. 

If you are at all likely to have tightness problems in the boot-top/calf area, go to a fitter.    If you have heel hold issues, consider the wrap liners and go to a fitter. 

 

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

While Intuitions may be stiffer than most liners that isn't invariably the case. My boots (Rossi Radical Pro's) which were advertised as 130 flex, whatever that means, had a relatively low front and relied on a very stiff tongue in the liner for the stiffness. I found the Powerwraps to be softer than the stock liners, to the point that I put back in the spine screws, both of which I had removed. 

 

Next time, you might try the HD or FX Race; said to have plenty of plastic in the tongue and sides. Guys I know who are bigger swear by them. IME, high performance OE liners tend to achieve stiffness by said plastic tongues and rears; actual liner foam tends to be fairly soft. So two different ways to the same end. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

The Dreamliner will have a looser heel than  Zipfits and a lot less material above the instep.     You can gain a lot of forefoot space with the Dreamliner, more than with the Zipfit. 

If you are at all likely to have tightness problems in the boot-top/calf area, go to a fitter.    If you have heel hold issues, consider the wrap liners and go to a fitter. 

 

^^^^ This. My Dreamliners definitely do not have as much hold down in the heel as the PW, but much more space in front, and a more connected feeling to the shell. My PW's had so much material around my lower shin/upper ankle that the boot shell was a rumor. 

post #17 of 18

It's not that hard to mold them at home. There are directions on their website and you can youtube it. I think the rice in sock method works best. Just make sure you work the sock all the way down in the toe box, which sound easier said than done. I found the best success when I put the sock in the liner and then put the liner in the shell. When the liner is in the shell, it is really difficult to work the rice all the way in the toe box. This part was critical for me since I have platypus feet.

post #18 of 18

I use a pair of the low volume Dreamliners in my Atomic RT CS140 (98 mm last consumer race boots) after the stock liners were totally packed out. I molded them once with the rice/sock method and used them at the end of last season and all this season. Unfortunately, they're packing out (probably have about 60 days or so of hard use on them), so I'll be looking at boots for next year.

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