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Product/Review 2014 Racetiger Speedwall GS UVO 178cm 19.1r

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

  First off since people have asked..  I am 180 lbs and around 5'11.

 

Today I was able to try the volkl gs uvo in what I thought was a 178cm ski.  Odd that I cannot seem to find that online in that size but I could be mistaken.  It could have been 180cm.  Either way I was not sure that I would like the ski.  Sort of some background I have been on a pair of 2012 WC Volkl 183 cm skis, some 2010 Volkl racetiger WC 27m skis and a 2008 RC Volkl Racetiger 168 cm 15.5 m ski.  So when it comes to Volkl I have been on a few for quite a few years.  To be honest none of the skis really stood out but where decent enough that I kept buying Volkl.  Then this year I started to demo quite a few slalom skis and really liked another ski brand more than any others that I demoed.  So it got me thinking about other types and brands of skis.  The idea of demoing another Volkl was sort of on the back burner, or was it.

 

I went skiing today with the idea of trying a bunch of skis and saw that Volkl with its fluorescent orange beckoning me to try.  Its UVO dampening system drawing me, whispering you want to try me.  I couldn't resist its call.  Within minutes the skis was setup and I was out the door to try yet another Volkl ski.  Holding them in my hands they didn't feel heavy in comparison to some skis mainly the Rossignol Hero Master I tried the day before.  They are heavier than the Atomic 3.0 GS 17m ski but not substantially more.

 

As with all gs skis I like to try railroad drills.  Its fun to see on a flat surface if they will initialize or laugh at you as you stumble to gain balance.  A railroad drill on a flat surface with not much forward initiation is like a death wish to try on gs ski.  For some odd reason I find it quite fun though maybe I like to taunt the ski before blasting down at speed.  Either way this ski didn't laugh at my feeble attempts to turn it.  Initiation was actually working of course the turns where quite lengthy but manageable.

 

After taunting the ski I repositioned my body for some serious turns.  Getting the ski on angles was not an issue at all.  The ski seems to feel quite planted when at angles.  Although it didn't feel quite as planted as the Hero.  Something about the Hero just feels like it would never slide.  This ski felt planted enough that I wouldn't back off, but enough to let you know it might slip a bit.  This could also be due to needing a tune since they are demo skis.  Either way I did have it slip once during the day on ice and it was not bad at all.

 

As for energy out of turns, it had a bit.  If you really arc the ski put it on angle and push then it seems to give out quite a bit of energy.  Again not as much as some other skis I have tried but a bit.  I never felt that the ski would rebound enough to launch you into the air.  It just didn't have that amount of rebound energy.

 

Then there is the uvo dampening system.  I am not really sure on it, sort of up in the air about it.  It seems to dampen the ski a bit but not really much.  In the end I guess that is a good thing.  You don't want something dampening the ski so much you cannot feel anything.  Sort of curious though if it is really doing all that much at all.  I didn't seem to notice much from it.  A dampening system can really do too much and make the ski feel dead.  That was not the case here so if it does do something they got the feel right.

 

Over all I really enjoyed the ski and ended up on it for four hours.  Still not sure if I would buy it or not.  The ski is quite a bit better for me than the Volkl GS skis I had been on in the past.  Initiation, short turns, and long turns feel quite a bit better but then I was on a 27m ski for far too long.  My over all concern is that at 19m it might be too much side cut even for a Midwest Nastar race.

post #2 of 16
What do you mean by too much sidecut for Nastar?
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

What do you mean by too much sidecut for Nastar?

 

I just wonder if a 19m side cut would create more drag than a 21 m or greater.  Ideally I think you want something you can get around the course but is the largest side cut that would barely make it.  Although this might be perfect, still I need to run a bunch through a course and see what happens.  Our ski school director seems to think that some of the gates are set at 17m.  If that is the case then this ski could work out a okay.  Ironic enough he skis on a 25m Fischer, which hopefully I will be able to test next week.

post #4 of 16

     As a mid west Pacesetter I would say 19m is not to much side cut, my skis are 18m and seem fine, tons of guys on the 19m skis and they are working well.That said we have 2-3 fast guys running 23-27m skis and they rip,but they would on any ski. As a pacesetter I like the wider tip of the cheater gs ski because it hooks up better when the course has not been slipped very well before my pace run. Also in the mid west they tend to turn better on the first 2 gates which is huge when you only have 10-11 gates to begin with.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPL View Post
 

     As a mid west Pacesetter I would say 19m is not to much side cut, my skis are 18m and seem fine, tons of guys on the 19m skis and they are working well.That said we have 2-3 fast guys running 23-27m skis and they rip,but they would on any ski. As a pacesetter I like the wider tip of the cheater gs ski because it hooks up better when the course has not been slipped very well before my pace run. Also in the mid west they tend to turn better on the first 2 gates which is huge when you only have 10-11 gates to begin with.

 

  These are all great points.  I really want to demo them again when I can get some course time as well.  It would be nice to compare the top skis I like this way but I doubt that will be possible.  This ski really is on my short list as it was wonderful on the flats.  I found exactly what you stated to be true, the ski will hook up on those first gates when you don't have speed.  The down side is that I am used to really stiff overblown skis.  As such I really liked the rebound and stability of a stiffer ski but find those don't turn on those first few gates.  What I would like to find is something that is that compromise and I believe it exists.  Either way this was a great ski.

post #6 of 16

Great review.

 

I'm thinking about doing some reviews of my own. It would mostly be of skies like my Norida dobberman spitfire pro 2010, Völkl Racetiger speedwall gs 2011 and some older race skies with radius form 21 to 27 meters. 

 

Idealy, there will be video footage too. POV. 

Would anyone here be interested in reading about older skies as well?

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thion View Post
 

Great review.

 

I'm thinking about doing some reviews of my own. It would mostly be of skies like my Norida dobberman spitfire pro 2010, Völkl Racetiger speedwall gs 2011 and some older race skies with radius form 21 to 27 meters. 

 

Idealy, there will be video footage too. POV. 

Would anyone here be interested in reading about older skies as well?

 

  I had a 27m fis volkl racetiger.  Could tell you all about it fairly quick.  It was a very stiff ski.  Difficult to initialize on those starting turns.  You had to ski it way forward or it would not be happy at all and at slower speeds good luck.  I don't think I could ever flex it far enough to get all the rebound of it.   It would hold on ice like nothing I have ever skid on.  The ski would wear on your body like crazy.  After skiing a day race training I would not be able to walk.  Always thought I could make up for those starting turns later in a course but never could.  Also I don't feel like I ever skied on it right because of the stiffness of the ski I never got the articulation desired out of the ski on a course.  Sort of reminds me of much older straight skis, so I gravitated toward it a bit.  I have a video of me skiing on it which shows how much I was unweighing the ski and sinking into it to try to get it to flex.

 

  I would be interested in your take on them though.

 

 


Edited by utahsaint - 3/2/15 at 10:42am
post #8 of 16

Looks like you have a good time:) 

I totally agree with you about  gs skis with larger radius requaers you to have a lot of forward flex.

When I first bought my 25 meters stöckli laser gs, I could not ski them at all.

 

But then I bought new boots with more forward lean, and I could do what was impossible before. 

You also have to go faster on skies with smaler radius. That might sound obvius, but when you are new to the ski, it can somtimes be scarry to go faster in order to make them turn:P

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by utahsaint View Post
 

 

I just wonder if a 19m side cut would create more drag than a 21 m or greater.  Ideally I think you want something you can get around the course but is the largest side cut that would barely make it.  Although this might be perfect, still I need to run a bunch through a course and see what happens.  Our ski school director seems to think that some of the gates are set at 17m.  If that is the case then this ski could work out a okay.  Ironic enough he skis on a 25m Fischer, which hopefully I will be able to test next week.

18M to 20M is about perfect for a typical midwest NASTAR course since most are relatively flat and you need to get that ski turning by the second gate.

If you want to split the difference between a FIS race ski and a softer cheater GS, try the Nordica Dobermann GSR EDT.  It crushes medium to long radius turns and initiates a little quicker than a traditional GS ski while being a little more forgiving.  

post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailtrimmer View Post
 

18M to 20M is about perfect for a typical midwest NASTAR course since most are relatively flat and you need to get that ski turning by the second gate.

If you want to split the difference between a FIS race ski and a softer cheater GS, try the Nordica Dobermann GSR EDT.  It crushes medium to long radius turns and initiates a little quicker than a traditional GS ski while being a little more forgiving.  

 

  I will have to give them a try.  I am quite used to FIS skis but they are holding me back.  Since they are so stiff I revert to old school habits and need to move forward. 

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailtrimmer View Post
 

, try the Nordica Dobermann GSR EDT.  It crushes medium to long radius turns and initiates a little quicker than a traditional GS ski while being a little more forgiving.  

 

That ski is sort of the best ski I have ever tried in my life. Sooo good.

post #12 of 16
Tell us about it
post #13 of 16

For NASTAR see what the pacesetter is running.

My pacesetter has gone to 25 m skis and adjusted the course to suit.

My 16m cheaters are too abrupt to make a good time.

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
That logic might work for the main place I ski at but won't for other areas. Which is why I would want more of a middle radius.

16m cheaters, wow and I thought the atomic 17m ski was quite a short radius.
post #15 of 16

That's why I cherish my pair of 2006 Atomic race stock 21m women's skis from the USST.

post #16 of 16

I cherish my collection of 5 race stock skis <21m   :) 

Except a pair of atomic gs 11 193? cm.  They are like 27 meters in reallity and maby to soft.. I might I to go faster on them to begin the love relationship though... 

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