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Tuning Shop Rec., S. Vermont or NH

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I picked up a pair of demo Rossi Pursuit 18s at Winter Park last week, and I'm thinking of getting them stone ground, something I've never had done.  From what I've read, a good grind needs a good tech.  Can anyone recommend a careful shop somewhere in Southern Vermont or New Hampshire?

 

Thx.

post #2 of 19
Thread Starter 
Bump.
post #3 of 19

Are you near Stratton? The Norse House has a brand new Montana robot....

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yes, I ski Stratton from time to time. I'll look into it. Thanks.
post #5 of 19

Have you talked with Frank at Bob Skinners (Mount Sunapee)?

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phishnerd View Post
 

Have you talked with Frank at Bob Skinners (Mount Sunapee)?


Haven't, but I will if you recommend him.  I ski Sunapee a lot.

post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by phishnerd View Post
 

Have you talked with Frank at Bob Skinners (Mount Sunapee)?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 


Haven't, but I will if you recommend him.  I ski Sunapee a lot.


Sounds like he did. Give them a try.

 

Have you thought about doing your own tuning ?

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

 

 


Sounds like he did. Give them a try.

 

Have you thought about doing your own tuning ?


I do wax and side edges.  I'm looking for a stone grind.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 


I do wax and side edges.  I'm looking for a stone grind.


With a Ski Visions base flattener you don't need to stone grind. The tool is about $60. My last pair of skis, had never been stone ground, in 4 seasons. They skied no different then the ski I replaced them with. The ski had over 110 day's on them.

 

You don't need perfect bases, I believe you have seen some of the threads about tuning, I also have a thread about using the Ski Visions base flattener.

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 


With a Ski Visions base flattener you don't need to stone grind. The tool is about $60. My last pair of skis, had never been stone ground, in 4 seasons. They skied no different then the ski I replaced them with. The ski had over 110 day's on them.

 

You don't need perfect bases, I believe you have seen some of the threads about tuning, I also have a thread about using the Ski Visions base flattener.


I'll take a look at that, too.  I'd like the structure a stone grind gives bases, though, I believe.

 

As I said, I've never had a pair of skis stone ground.

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 


I'll take a look at that, too.  I'd like the structure a stone grind gives bases, though, I believe.

 

As I said, I've never had a pair of skis stone ground.

Over rated IMO. You don't need perfect bases. I get most of my bases flat before waxing with the ski visions tool. I have never gotten the P-tex perfectly flat from tip to tail. I get enough flat so the 3* edge guide and 1* base guide have a good enough surface to slide on.

 

It's more about the amount of wax in the base and having the edge sharp tip to tail.

post #12 of 19

I am a race coach and spent a lot of time learning about tuning skis. There are 3 shops I recommend. Artech in Lebanon NH, Edgewise in Vt, Stowe I think, and SkiMd in Framingham MA. There maybe other good places, but just because they have a fancy machine, doesn't mean they know how to use it. The three I named do race skis for everyone in their area. 

 

The reason for a stone grind is to redo the base bevels. Everything else can be done by hand or with a Ski Visions tool, but the grind does it all. Once ground, a little routine maintenance goes a long way to keeping them in good shape.

post #13 of 19

I agree 100% with bttocs re Edgewise and SkiMD. I have bought things from Artech but never had a grind. However, the other 2 are absolutely great shops.

post #14 of 19

Agree with the three recommendations especially edgewise-really professional job done on my kids race skis. I would be hesitant to use Norse House as of now. I saw a really bad job they did on a friends ski. They have a big and beautiful new machine but would give them another year on there learning curve before trusting them.

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post
 

I am a race coach and spent a lot of time learning about tuning skis. There are 3 shops I recommend. Artech in Lebanon NH, Edgewise in Vt, Stowe I think, and SkiMd in Framingham MA. There maybe other good places, but just because they have a fancy machine, doesn't mean they know how to use it. The three I named do race skis for everyone in their area. 

 

The reason for a stone grind is to redo the base bevels. Everything else can be done by hand or with a Ski Visions tool, but the grind does it all. Once ground, a little routine maintenance goes a long way to keeping them in good shape.

 

 I've heard about Artech.  It's probably the closest.  I'll give them a try.  Thanks for the rec.

post #16 of 19
Stratton Area - The Starting Gate

They are a long time family run trusted reputable shop. Chance Longley recently coached my son in a race Camp. He really knows and cares about skiing; park to race course..
post #17 of 19

Edgewise for sure but that's not So. Vt.

 

My rec is Totem Pole in Ludlow. You need to specify your angles. Also specify you do not want tip/tails dulled. Just to make sure. If you specify angles, it's unlikely you'd get that but I can't tell you the number of skis I've seen where this has been done by "good" shops on non race skis.

 

There's several structures you can choose from. You also need to decide if you want a "radial" tune. That is where there's more base bevel in tips/tails than underfoot. You can do .5, .75 underfoot and then more for tip/tail. Usually .25 degrees.

Talk to Toren he's the co owner and runs the shop with the $350k robotic machine.

 

If you're going to Killington it would be Peak Performance, but it's been years since I've dealt with them.

post #18 of 19

I think people underestimate the usefulness of a good stone grind. I got Edgewise a fair amount and will sometimes have a brand new pair of skis stoneground to change how it feels. A really linear grind can make the ski feel like it won't turn and you can free that up with a curvier grind. A deep grind runs better in spring snow, but not so great on cold snow. You can get an all-rounder, but with a good tech, if you know what you want, you can take a good ski and make it better. I just picked up my one day old Nordica El Capos from getting ground. I am going to pull sidewalls and do the bevels tonight. I had him do a medium deep chevron grind that will be OK in spring snow, but not hopeless on cold snow next year. I have a pair of FX94s with a spring grind on them that run like the wind and suctiony wet snow. I pretty much only use them when there are puddles.

 

Here's Edgewises page of grinds. http://www.edgewiseskiservice.com/alpine-grind-information/

 

My Capos just got the CHV. It's not one size fits all, you can tell him how deep you want it. I use a lighter CHV on my Firearrows. Most of my race skis have the KA or the KT4. My daughter was on KT4 until March and then we switched her skis to a deeper CHV.

post #19 of 19

the alpine grind page doesn't show up in Firefox for some reason

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