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Outside's "Perfect" Beginner Gear

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

So, I ran across this in my FB feed yesterday and wondered what the collective over here would have to say about Outside Magazine's choices for the "perfect" ski gear for what they actually describe as an advanced beginner/low intermediate.

 

I raised my eyebrow at their ski choice, but that's me.

Thoughts?

 

http://www.outsideonline.com/fitness/zero-to-hero/Beginner-Skiers-Quiver.html

post #2 of 13

I wonder how much each of those manufacturer's paid to have their specific product listed...

 

I know, for me, that Giro helmets simply don't fit.  I'd like these types of articles a lot more if they listed the basic things you need and what qualities you should be looking for.  i.e., helmets should fit securely, skis should be in the 75-85mm waist range to promote learning, boots should be purchased from a knowledgeable fitter, etc.

 

Instead, they're always the same:  this helmet, this ski, this boot, etc.  I'm sure everything they list is a fine example, but no single product out there is the "be all end all".

 

But telling people what they should look for in a product doesn't fit in with the "just tell me what I need to buy" mentality that seems to be prevalent today.  So we're left with space-filler articles like these that really communicate nothing.

post #3 of 13
For me the concept of "here is a reasonable trade off price/performance wise that works for never-evers, also useful as a comparison standard" works just fine.   

The problem with criteria is that they simply don't feel enabling.   We can give all the criteria we want but the beginner is still faced with the exhaustive labour of matching everything offered against those criteria and not knowing where to compromise.  

It's like kitchen recipes for an apps-salad-entree-desert dinner .   Sure, not everyone will like it.  Sure, some may not even be able to eat it.    Sure, general rules and ratios like flour/sugar/water/salt would be more useful long term.    But the world is full of people who prefer to follow recipes instead of improvising in the kitchen.    Recipes are enabling.  

Hopefully so are articles like this. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

 

Instead, they're always the same:  this helmet, this ski, this boot, etc.  I'm sure everything they list is a fine example, but no single product out there is the "be all end all".


To the OP, I am not a fan of Nomads, but they would work just fine around here. 

post #4 of 13

wow - and for a beginning skiier their tab comes to $1485, and that's before base layers and socks and boot bag and other niceties

post #5 of 13

$75 for "beginner" ski poles! Lol!

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tartegnin View Post
 

wow - and for a beginning skiier their tab comes to $1485, and that's before base layers and socks and boot bag and other niceties



Pretty much on a par with cycling then. 

post #7 of 13

Personally, I don't think the ski choice is terrible- a modest waist on a ski with lots of sidecut.

 

Of course, the correct 1st-ever ski purchase (in my ever-so-humble opinion) is the 5 year old intermediate level ski that you can score at the ski swap for $50. Once you learn how to actually drive a ski your preferences will change dramatically, so the biggest thing about your first pair of skis is having a consistent pair on your feet and avoid the rental line.

 

But of course, you don't get free samples from manufacturers when you advocate ski swap skis.

 

An 80 waist boot for an adult low intermediate of an average weight seems reasonable as well. Slightly stiffer than the individual needs at that moment, but with room to grow.

post #8 of 13

Don't think the skis are so far off base. And don't think advertisers paid a dime. It's not that crude. More like, companies whose products get good ratings are likely to return next season. Companies whose products get dinged or ignored, not so much. No conspiracy, just market capitalism...

post #9 of 13
Fancy poles. And I thought paying $40 at whistler last week for poles was expensive...
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFish View Post

Fancy poles. And I thought paying $40 at whistler last week for poles was expensive...

 

Too fancy for my money. $5 used poles from a thrift shop are fine for a beginner (or just about anyone, really). This is really intermediate stuff. Boots are a bit stiff for beginners, and the skis, while they turn easily, are a bit harsh-riding for a noobie, IMO.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

I wonder how much each of those manufacturer's paid to have their specific product listed...

 

I know, for me, that Giro helmets simply don't fit.  I'd like these types of articles a lot more if they listed the basic things you need and what qualities you should be looking for.  i.e., helmets should fit securely, skis should be in the 75-85mm waist range to promote learning, boots should be purchased from a knowledgeable fitter, etc.

 

Instead, they're always the same:  this helmet, this ski, this boot, etc.  I'm sure everything they list is a fine example, but no single product out there is the "be all end all".

 

But telling people what they should look for in a product doesn't fit in with the "just tell me what I need to buy" mentality that seems to be prevalent today.  So we're left with space-filler articles like these that really communicate nothing.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by tartegnin View Post
 

wow - and for a beginning skiier their tab comes to $1485, and that's before base layers and socks and boot bag and other niceties



Pretty much on a par with cycling then. 


 

No lift ticket needed to cycle on the road. 

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ali pine View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

I wonder how much each of those manufacturer's paid to have their specific product listed...

 

I know, for me, that Giro helmets simply don't fit.  I'd like these types of articles a lot more if they listed the basic things you need and what qualities you should be looking for.  i.e., helmets should fit securely, skis should be in the 75-85mm waist range to promote learning, boots should be purchased from a knowledgeable fitter, etc.

 

Instead, they're always the same:  this helmet, this ski, this boot, etc.  I'm sure everything they list is a fine example, but no single product out there is the "be all end all".

 

But telling people what they should look for in a product doesn't fit in with the "just tell me what I need to buy" mentality that seems to be prevalent today.  So we're left with space-filler articles like these that really communicate nothing.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by tartegnin View Post
 

wow - and for a beginning skiier their tab comes to $1485, and that's before base layers and socks and boot bag and other niceties



Pretty much on a par with cycling then. 


 

No lift ticket needed to cycle on the road. 

 

http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2015/02/02/bts-mi-street-skier-pulled-over-live.wxyz?iid=ob_videoleaf_organicfooter&iref=obnetwork

post #13 of 13
Everything listed is MSRP... You could go in many shops today and half the bill now that things are on sale.
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