or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Getting a ski back on on a steep hardpack hill.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Getting a ski back on on a steep hardpack hill. - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Oh.  OK.

post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

I tried repeatedly to create a ledge to get the ski as flat as possible. No go. This was really hard snow. A little softer than the coffee table my feet are on as I type this. I won't call it ice. I know the trick about poking the tail in, but that wasn't an option.

I tried to use the downhill ski, itself as the ledge, but couldn't keep it nearly flat enough to get my boot in at the required angle. I would have fallen down the hill, even using poles, trying to get my foot at the angle the ski was on.

If I understand you right, the ski you were trying to click into kept sliding (due to steep and slick slope) whenever you tried to step into it.  This issue isn't common but it can happen.  When this happens, I hold the loose ski with my hand and rather than pushing down on the ski, lift up on the binding.  It's a bit awkward but it can work.

post #33 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanvg View Post

If I understand you right, the ski you were trying to click into kept sliding (due to steep and slick slope) whenever you tried to step into it.  This issue isn't common but it can happen.  When this happens, I hold the loose ski with my hand and rather than pushing down on the ski, lift up on the binding.  It's a bit awkward but it can work.

Yeah,I tried that. Couldn't get it to work.
post #34 of 41
Does nobody remember 180 step turns that we did with 200+ skis to get turn in the right direction when jump turns just would not work? With my GS ski I have yet to have to do a jump turn let alone a 180 step turn.
post #35 of 41

Oh, we remember them.  I remember kicking the ceiling back when I was a younger man too.  I'm not even going to try that today.

post #36 of 41
With the short skis today they should be a piece of cake.rolleyes.gif
post #37 of 41

R: Getting a ski back on on a steep hardpack hill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Does nobody remember 180 step turns that we did with 200+ skis to get turn in the right direction when jump turns just would not work? With my GS ski I have yet to have to do a jump turn let alone a 180 step turn.
I remember it. And my knees remember it as well but as alrady said...I am not even thinking about doing it now. Not this winter at least.
post #38 of 41

Like SH said, it's way easier to manage on the uphill side, but regardless the trick is getting your toe lug hooked under the wings of the toe piece.  When the ski is downhill on a steep slope you have to reach down and grab the tail to do that.  Then you can carefully tip the ski on edge and stomp down the heel with the ski on edge and toe hooked under the toe piece wings instead of flat on the snow.  There is an art to it and it takes some practice to perfect. 

post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Maybe a bit more advanced, but easy... Stand on your uphill ski. Put the other ski parallel and next to the UPHILL side of your uphill ski with the binding a bit forward of your uphill foot. Your 'loose' ski can be parallel to the surface of the snow... Now using you poles for balance as mentioned above, step your downhill 'ski-less' foot in front of and across your uphill ski, and step into the binding of your ski, yes, for a moment you'll have both skis on, and your downhill leg will be crossed over your uphill... Keep standing on the uphill foot, and just uncross your legs... Yeah, it sounds crazy, but it's easy. It's also easier to clear your boot of snow and ice before clicking in.

This basically is how I start to put on BOTH skis when on the steep. I'll do the crossover of the downhill foot while standing in the uphill boot and then just make the foot with a ski on my downhill ski. You can adjust your knee of your downhill leg toward downhill to match the plane of the boot sole with the plane of the ski. After stepping up on the foot with ski attached, I create a little space for adjusting the plane of the uphill boot sole with the plane of the uphill ski. One thing that happens when folks try to "step down" into a binding is the brake arms may not let you flatten the retainer under the boot, so moving the foot/ski slightly forward will help.
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post


This basically is how I start to put on BOTH skis when on the steep. I'll do the crossover of the downhill foot while standing in the uphill boot and then just make the foot with a ski on my downhill ski. You can adjust your knee of your downhill leg toward downhill to match the plane of the boot sole with the plane of the ski. After stepping up on the foot with ski attached, I create a little space for adjusting the plane of the uphill boot sole with the plane of the uphill ski. One thing that happens when folks try to "step down" into a binding is the brake arms may not let you flatten the retainer under the boot, so moving the foot/ski slightly forward will help.

This is the trick

post #41 of 41

I have this "problem" on pretty much every race, just that with me it's even a bit worse, as I have no poles, and some 15-20kg photo backpack on my back... not to mention AT boots trying to get stuffed in race bindings :) So easiest one is to point ski uphill, step in it, then I step on this ski pointing it across the hill (90deg to fall line), put second ski pointing it uphill (so brakes work and hold it still), and step in it. With short SL skis, this is really easy, with 195cm GS skis, it's a bit harder, as on steep and icy hill you don't want to have uphill pointing ski being over your standing ski. But with a bit of practice, it's no big deal :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Getting a ski back on on a steep hardpack hill.