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Fun progression for Level6-7 skier who needs work on foot to pressure control

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Anyone have any fun, challenging progressions for a level 6-7 skier who continuously puts more pressure on inside foot at end of shaping phase through finish of turn?

 

Thanks for any suggestions.

post #2 of 14

Multiple reason may exist for getting too inside of the turn through completion. More than likely the upper body and pelvis are not in a good place and this in turn limits how much you can stand on that outside ski. Corrections vary with cause though so it is very difficult to assess the root cause without a lot more information. Can you walk us through what you do in all phases of a turn, not just the last third? Even that may be a bit imprecise since if this skier is you, your perceptions at level 6 / 7 may not include the same level of detail a trained observer would perceive. Snowmass has plenty of good pros with a keen eye for just such detail BTW.

 

As far as progressions, go with a simple isolation activity that features the new movement pattern you want to experiment with, then over time incorporate that new movement into the overall package.

The simplest thing is to start with a pole plant while stopped. Using the downhill pole, make it touch (no stabbing) the snow eighteen inches downhill of the skis but here is the key to this whole activity, the pole must stay vertical (the grip directly over the tip).

 

Now traverse and drag that downhill pole while keeping it in the same position we just used. With practice the movement and pole drag becomes easier and easier, so take enough time to groove this move before moving onto the next step. Let me say this twice, take enough time to groove the move.

 

Finally it is time to drag the pole as we turn. Start with a J turn and as you drag a pole begin to turn away from that pole (drag the left pole while turning right, the right pole when turning left). When this is easy start dragging the pole as you do a series of linked turns.

 

So there you have a progression that should help get a skier more over the outside ski without directly speaking about active foot to foot weight transfers. A ton of other activities exist but depend largely on what the actual root cause might be. Again discovering why something occurs usually involves a lot more information than provided so far. The generic pole drag drill thus may not be the best cure and might only serve to demonstrate a simple to complex progression format.

Enjoy

JASP

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 


Thank you - very helpful.

post #4 of 14

Try ditching the poles and skiing with bamboo over the shoulders (as long as there are no shoulder issues). Play games with trying to keep the bamboo level to the snow surface at all times vs early or late orientation mapping. Also be careful with taking bamboo on the lifts and returning the boo to the place of borrowing (Patrol usually has some spare boo available).

post #5 of 14

Yup, that works too as long as the skier has the proprioceptic awareness to know if the pole deviates from parallel to the slope (not level in the true sense). Many skiers at the six / seven level do not and must depend on an observer for feedback. Another thought to consider is that excessive rotary may still be possible which would drop the inside hip and shoulder aft in spite of the pole staying level to the Earth, or parallel to the slope. As a long time patroller I know this one first hand because we taught and probably still teach patrollers to turn your load ( bamboo bundles and such over the shoulders) into the turn prior to the body and feet doing so. The patrol roll is a hangover effect from doing such work. Which leads right back to seeking a qualified eye for feedback.

 

A double pole drag (commonly called a pole box) will do the same leveling of the shoulders relative to the slope thing and does not require additional equipment to be borrowed. In any case without more information at best all we can really offer is generic theoretical advice. More data please...


Edited by justanotherskipro - 2/26/15 at 12:29pm
post #6 of 14

Good ones above and here is another variation.  Standing with hands is proper position, force the tips of your poles into the snow behind you using leverage from your wrists. Your objective is to make sure the pressure on the pole tips stays constant.  Now go ski. 

 

Also if you don't have a bamboo pole as Rusty suggests.  Hold your poles horizontally in front of you with hands about 8" apart. Then cross your hands and tuck the poles up under your armpits. 

 

For something new, check out this progression from JF Beaulieu on separation through the arch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhKen0s9Po8  Load it on your phone and take it with you for reference.

 

Finally, JF say's (starting at 1:53) in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_XuGWW6vcQ "Edging happens as a REEESULT  of the inside leg getting shorter"

 

If you play around with this and focus on making the inside shorter (flexing) as the turn develops you will all of a sudden see how it allows your CoM to easily move to the inside of the turn creating edge and extension against your outside. Remember to keep your inside foot underneath you as you are shortening.

 

Oh, and check our Mikaela Shiffrin and her "Get over it drill"  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh7KF49GzOc

 

Lot's of great stuff out there!

 

Good Luck

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JESINSTR View Post
 

Good ones above and here is another variation.  Standing with hands is proper position, force the tips of your poles into the snow behind you using leverage from your wrists. Your objective is to make sure the pressure on the pole tips stays constant.  Now go ski. 

 

Also if you don't have a bamboo pole as Rusty suggests.  Hold your poles horizontally in front of you with hands about 8" apart. Then cross your hands and tuck the poles up under your armpits. 

 

For something new, check out this progression from JF Beaulieu on separation through the arch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhKen0s9Po8  Load it on your phone and take it with you for reference.

 

Finally, JF say's (starting at 1:53) in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_XuGWW6vcQ "Edging happens as a REEESULT  of the inside leg getting shorter"

 

If you play around with this and focus on making the inside shorter (flexing) as the turn develops you will all of a sudden see how it allows your CoM to easily move to the inside of the turn creating edge and extension against your outside. Remember to keep your inside foot underneath you as you are shortening.

 

Oh, and check our Mikaela Shiffrin and her "Get over it drill"  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh7KF49GzOc

 

Lot's of great stuff out there!

 

Good Luck

 

I am having difficulty picturing this.  Can you explain?

 

The get over it drill seems a bit difficult for a Level 6 or 7 skier.  Thoughts?

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post
 

 

I am having difficulty picturing this.  Can you explain?

 

The get over it drill seems a bit difficult for a Level 6 or 7 skier.  Thoughts?

On the contrary, the "get over it drill" once mastered, may be the very drill that will boost a 6/7 to a 8/9. 

 

The ability to manage ski pressure (which ski, how much, where on the ski and where in the turn) is a key skill you will acquire on your way.

 

It is a good way to ensure that you CoM is out and ahead of your BoS especially when things are fast and steep.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post
 

 

I am having difficulty picturing this.  Can you explain?

 

The get over it drill seems a bit difficult for a Level 6 or 7 skier.  Thoughts?

Rich Handled the get over it part and here is more on the pole tuck. 

 

So, Hold your poles out in front, horizontally (perpendicular/across your skis), palms down. Then re-grab the poles by crossing your hands and roll your hands (palms up) so that the poles tuck up into your armpits.  This solidifies the mass/weight of your arms (up to 40 pounds in men) into your upper body.  I find it allows me to really concentrate on what is happening down below. 

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JESINSTR View Post
 

Rich Handled the get over it part and here is more on the pole tuck. 

 

So, Hold your poles out in front, horizontally (perpendicular/across your skis), palms down. Then re-grab the poles by crossing your hands and roll your hands (palms up) so that the poles tuck up into your armpits.  This solidifies the mass/weight of your arms (up to 40 pounds in men) into your upper body.  I find it allows me to really concentrate on what is happening down below. 

 

Got it.  Thanks.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post
 

 

Got it.  Thanks.

Oh an on the Get Over it Drill,  Notice how she uses a DOUBLE pole plant to initiate. I think this is critical because it helps assure proper alignment moving to the new edge.  Have Fun!

post #12 of 14

Skating and Skate to Shape would be a good one here.

 

Agree on double pole drag too. I like that they will feel if the pole lifts, they get intrinsic feedback from that.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

Anyone have any fun, challenging progressions for a level 6-7 skier who continuously puts more pressure on inside foot at end of shaping phase through finish of turn?

Thanks for any suggestions.
Do they ski with a wide stance? If you're skiing with a shoulder vs hip width stance bringing it in might help.
Edited by clink83 - 2/28/15 at 8:43pm
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