or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › traveling and doing a ski clinic alone
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

traveling and doing a ski clinic alone

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I am considering doing an intensive 2-day women's clinic at a VT resort.  I have never done a clinic and I have never traveled alone to a ski resort. I ride alone a lot since I have weekdays off, and no one else does, but I have never stayed at a resort alone.  Have any of you gone to a clinic alone, did you meet others that were alone, etc.  Also, I've never done a clinic before and the length of day is pretty intimidating.  I've taken lessons but they are typically 2 hours long.  I learned to snowboard 2 years ago and I'm 45 now and I just don't know if I can make it all day.  ( I had never skied before learning to snowboard, I moved to the NE from south fla)  I was in Colorado last week and 10-3 is my stamina limit.  Any advice????

 

Mod note: moved to General Skiing

post #2 of 22

I've taken a couple all-day clinics over the years.  Instructors understand that their students are not full-time skiers or gym rats and will "dial back the pace" somewhat to make sure everybody makes it through the day.  I can only rarely go bell-to-bell when I'm out just skiing by myself or with friends, but in clinic situations where you're stopping more frequently, doing lower intensity things (i.e., drill work, etc.), lasting the day has never been a problem.

 

If you're able to last five hours in Colorado altitude, I'd say you have plenty of fitness to make it through an all-day clinic in Vermont.

 

The various clinics I attended were run by this site (now defunct), so I while I went alone, I also already knew most of the attendees from our mutual participation on this site...  So I can't really comment on the makeup of more traditional clinics.

post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by starvingartist View Post
 

I am considering doing an intensive 2-day women's clinic at a VT resort.  I have never done a clinic and I have never traveled alone to a ski resort. I ride alone a lot since I have weekdays off, and no one else does, but I have never stayed at a resort alone.  Have any of you gone to a clinic alone, did you meet others that were alone, etc.  Also, I've never done a clinic before and the length of day is pretty intimidating.  I've taken lessons but they are typically 2 hours long.  I learned to snowboard 2 years ago and I'm 45 now and I just don't know if I can make it all day.  ( I had never skied before learning to snowboard, I moved to the NE from south fla)  I was in Colorado last week and 10-3 is my stamina limit.  Any advice????


In general, the advantage of doing a multi-day clinic is that you will meet like-minded folks.  So after the first day, you wouldn't really be alone for much of the time.  Especially if you are somewhat social and get together with a few of the participants for dinner the first evening.  Clinic schedules allow for breaks so you should be fine.

 

Is the clinic for skiing or snowboarding?

post #4 of 22
What Marz said. When taking a ski trip alone, a clinic, or lessons, is an ideal way to meet and be around other people. If there are others there solo you can see if they want to get together for apres or dinner, that is, if you want that.

If you find the day length really hard, you can bag it early. I don't think i've ever been in a lesson or clinic where at least one person DIDN'T leave early. But unless it's some kind of extreme clinic, these types of things can move rather slowly, since you have a whole group to keep track of, and there are always drills...
post #5 of 22

I have gone to clinics by myself and have had great times.  The great thing is that you can choose the level of social interaction you want to have.   As others have said, it is a great opportunity to meet new people with whom you already have something in common -skiing or boarding.    2 days of clinics will likely be a lot of skiing interspersed with talking, practicing, lunch etc.  I don't think it will be too much. Plus, it is 2 days, not 5.   By the time you ski all day, après ski drink/hot tub, dinner, there will not be a lot of time left over. Bring a good book if you have time after dinner.  I think you will have a great time.

post #6 of 22

Having recently done a one-day clinic at Killington, I can say that it wasn't that tiring.  Actually far less than a typical day of skiing.  With a group of people (12 in my clinic), there were lots of times when we paused to discuss something, or stopped mid-run to wait for everyone to regroup, plus a break for lunch, etc.

post #7 of 22

You'd probably have a good time. I've stayed alone at resorts on ski trips before and loved it. If you're worried about fatiguing part way through the clinic day you could tell the instructor that you're too tired and want to bow out for the day. They can't physically force you to continue if you don't want to.

post #8 of 22

I went to a 5-day camp in November, which was my first exposure to that sort of thing.  Lasting the whole day wasn't a problem at all.  I had plenty of time to stand and rest while the instruction was happening, and discovered I needed to dress more warmly than I typically do.  Meeting people wasn't hard and, since everybody was there for the same thing, it made an easy starting point for conversation.  There seemed to be groups going out for dinner every night.  If you don't hear other people talking about it, ask your group before you split for the day if anybody wants company for dinner.

 

Have fun!

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for your input. I'm not antisocial, I love meeting new people, I'm just not used to traveling alone. I think I may do it. This is my third season and I'm just now able to conquer blues - well the blues at Breck - not sure if they are harder than other blues. As for the fatigue factor you all make good points. It's not like the runs in VT will be three miles long :-)
post #10 of 22

Traveling solo is weird at first if you've never done it but once you get used to it the freedom is really nice.

post #11 of 22

Go for it!  I ski alone a lot as well and have gone to clinics and even exams alone.  Sometimes I find people to hang out with, other times I just enjoy going back to my room alone (I do tend to go to sleep early anyway.)

 

Blues in the east can be harder than blues in the west as the snow is usually not as soft and they are not as wide, but this has been a great snow season, so you should be fine.  In any case if you are passionate about skiing a 2 day clinic is just the ticket!

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

 

other times I just enjoy going back to my room alone (I do tend to go to sleep early anyway.)

 

 

One nice thing about traveling solo is that you can eat Pringles and drink beer in your room totally naked and no one else cares.

 

I've heard.

 

What?

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
 

One nice thing about traveling solo is that you can eat Pringles and drink beer in your room totally naked and no one else cares.

 

I've heard.

 

What?

 

That was you!

post #14 of 22
It wasn't me! I swear it!
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

It wasn't me! I swear it!

 

Since your chips had ripples, it couldn't have been you?   

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Good point about the difficulty I the west. We had fresh powder and falling didn't really hurt. And the snow was slow, so yeah I agree.
post #17 of 22

Soooo, where are you going ?

 

Really, like other said you'll be fine. Sometimes it's nice to ski alone.

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by starvingartist View Post

 And the snow was slow, so yeah I agree.

 

Fresh in Colorado was slow?    What wax did you have on?

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starvingartist View Post

 And the snow was slow, so yeah I agree.

 

Fresh in Colorado was slow?    What wax did you have on?

 

I guess you forgot what being an Intermediate skier is like.  I on the other hand remember struggling in 4" of fresh snow quite well.  It may have been 10 years ago, but I remember the feeling like it was yesterday.  It's why I appreciate my skills so much more than someone who has been skiing since they were 5 years old.

 

If there's any amount of 3D snow at that level of skiing, the default pivot movement doesn't work very well and thus it slows one down significantly.  Yes carving through fresh snow is fast, but pivotting through it isn't.  

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starvingartist View Post

 And the snow was slow, so yeah I agree.

 

Fresh in Colorado was slow?    What wax did you have on?

 

I guess you forgot what being an Intermediate skier is like.  I on the other hand remember struggling in 4" of fresh snow quite well.  It may have been 10 years ago, but I remember the feeling like it was yesterday.  It's why I appreciate my skills so much more than someone who has been skiing since they were 5 years old.

 

If there's any amount of 3D snow at that level of skiing, the default pivot movement doesn't work very well and thus it slows one down significantly.  Yes carving through fresh snow is fast, but pivotting through it isn't.  

 

Oh I am not advanced enough to have completely forgotten that era of frustration - but thanks for the compliment.  

 It's just that a general statement of 'the snow was slow' doesn't really carry, to me anyway, a sense of "hard to work through for me as a skier especially in turns".   So I read that as grabby, slow or harsh snow in a "every skier was having problems" way.      Further, I would expect fresh snow in CO to be considerably easier to work through even with pivoting movements than fresh in NY or southern VT, let alone fresh in CA or OR or WA.    Hence my tone of surprise.    

Apologies if I misunderstood or if I made someone feel self-conscious. 

post #21 of 22
No my apologies. Knee jerk post.
post #22 of 22
Knowing that you haven't traveled alone, I'd do this if for no other reason than that. Being comfortable traveling alone is a good skill. Plus, you get to do things like have Pringles and beer in bed (for me, takeout in bed in front of bad tv. Love it).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › traveling and doing a ski clinic alone