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So I got free skis. I need info and other helpful tips.

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

FYI I am new to skiing (3 time skier) I got invited to a ski trip knew nothing about skiing, rented skis and fell as soon as i hit the top of the slope.

So 0 lessons but I'm much better now.

Anyway my buddy was going to get rid of some skis and i offered to take them so none the less free skis.

I mean I liked the way they looked and they seemed to have a "modern" look to them as well.

But I have no idea what the: Year/style/application. is so if anyone has info thank you in advance.

Where is SLO?

Here is the bad news one is cracked on the top of the ski (pictured)

 

Iv'e seen a story where a guy rivets his skis back together and they work fine (supposedly).

The place the crack is on the ski to me, has no way of getting cracked more unless i go ski first into the ground.

Am I wrong on this? Is it worth the time to repair them?

Thought suggestions?

 

Sniagrab right I have no time for it, it'll be ransacked and nothing will be left.(at least what I would want).

All in a ll ill still have to rent cause I still don't have gear but id figure I'd try them anyway.

post #2 of 26
Slovakia?
post #3 of 26

Maybe Slovenia or San Luis Obispo?

post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 

I'm liking the suggestions so far.

post #5 of 26

Pretty sure Elan skis are made in Slovenia.

post #6 of 26

Elan Stiletto SCX?

 

Incorporating many of the innovations found in the Terminator, the Stiletto is the second model of the next generation SCX collection. Developed for the intermediate to advanced skier who is looking for a ski that will let them go anywhere, do anything, with the ultimate in confidence. This ski features the new integrated plate system, second generation SCX dimensions and mounting platform, for improved turning and steering efficiency. This combination allows for greater confidence and control on all snow and terrain conditions. Engineered Specifications * 3-D Wood Monoblock Construction * Integrated Composite Plate * Parabolic Sidecut * Tip-waist-tail width (mm): 105-62-105 * Sizes: 153, 163, 173, 183 * Sidecut Radius (m) 10, 11, 13, 15 (by size)
Model Year: 1999

post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbes429 View Post
 

Pretty sure Elan skis are made in Slovenia.

 

Yup, they are.

post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 

Well that's great only 1 question left are they worth fixing? 

post #9 of 26
Put the skis together or flat base down on the floor and see if one is bent. It could of been stuffed into a bump or whatever.
post #10 of 26
Bigger issue is the bindings. They are no longer indemnified. No one will work on them. So, you'd have to replace them. Not sure it's worth putting new bindings on those things.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrikk1450 View Post
 

Well that's great only 1 question left are they worth fixing? 


No, since you can find far newer used skis for cheap and any money you sink into them would be better spent elsewhere. Also at 181cm they're big skis and unless you're a big person they're probably not a good size for you. Also any money you spend on your first ski gear purchases should go into some boots.

post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemon Zest View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrikk1450 View Post
 

Well that's great only 1 question left are they worth fixing? 


No, since you can find far newer used skis for cheap and any money you sink into them would be better spent elsewhere. Also at 181cm they're big skis and unless you're a big person they're probably not a good size for you. Also any money you spend on your first ski gear purchases should go into some boots.

 

^^^^

 

This.  

 

+ about 15

 

On top of everything else, even a "free" ski is going to cost you about $50.00 by the time you get done with the mandatory (IMO) complete tune and binding check. Therefore it pays to get something worth having, if that makes sense. 

post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 

Well thanks for all the Info 

It turns out there like 2005 according to my buddy and he skied them last year so ill gamble.

post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrikk1450 View Post
 

It turns out there like 2005 according to my buddy and he skied them last year so ill gamble.

 

And you believe him?   :D    If I was to show you a Pentium Pro workstation and tell you it was from 2005 would you believe me?  

Elan completely revamped their line in '99 and ^those^ skis went as extinct as the dodo, replaced by the far nicer Integra series.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by derrikk1450 View Post
 and he skied them last year so ill gamble.

 

Have fun.

post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 

Your right BUT Id like to see how they do anyway. I mean iv'e seen people use old style skis today just cause they like them so.

It is what it is.

Plus I don't plan to buy skis till spring or sniagrab I feel like that event will just be ransacked after the first day and not much will be left.

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrikk1450 View Post
 

Your right BUT Id like to see how they do anyway. I mean iv'e seen people use old style skis today just cause they like them so.

It is what it is.

Plus I don't plan to buy skis till spring or sniagrab I feel like that event will just be ransacked after the first day and not much will be left.

 

Like I said above, have fun, enjoy.       The crack is the only thing that would remotely give me concern; non-race Elans of that era did not have terribly good cores.   So if the cap is cracked....oof.  


When you're ready to buy the options will be enormous.   It's incredibly easy to find budget ski gear.    Sniagrab is just a drop in a bucket, well, swimming pool really, don't get too wedded to the idea of buying there. 


Edited by cantunamunch - 2/25/15 at 10:06pm
post #17 of 26
post #18 of 26

I would ski those, sure... but here are two important questions that haven't been asked:

 

Did your friend also give you the boots that they are adjusted for? 

Are you approximately the same height, weight and age?

 

If the answer to either of those questions is NO then you will run head-long into the non indemnified binding issue mentioned above. If you don't have boots you have a major problem with trying to use those skis.

post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 

I plan to get them fitted to the boots at the ski resort if possible and yes I am 6" 4' and I am with in 20 lbs of him.

It'll be a gamble.

If they say no to to tuning the skis then ill chuck them,or make a chair out of em and be done no loss.

post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrikk1450 View Post
 

I plan to get them fitted to the boots at the ski resort if possible and yes I am 6" 4' and I am with in 20 lbs of him.

It'll be a gamble.

If they say no to to tuning the skis then ill chuck them,or make a chair out of em and be done no loss.

They almost certainly won't adjust the bindings for you. Maybe if you slip the guy an extra $20 or something under the table, IDK. Since they're on a plate system you can always try to adjust them yourself.

post #21 of 26
Buy boots fitted first and rent the skis. You'll be better off long term for a whole bunch of reasons. Just to list a few, comfort, development and modest importantly safety!

Using skis with bindings that no one will work on, in rental boots is just a disaster waiting to happen. Being a new skier and trying it to set up the bindings oneself is just as bad and as a combined thing, just makes it worse.

Don't get me wrong I have and still ski even older skis. I enjoy them because I learned on them and know how to set them up and maintain them. As a new skier take advantage of what the new skis and boots provide. Secondly, as a beginner the boot binding ski interface protects you more as you are at greater risk for injury. I'm sure you'd hate that a hospital stay was included in the trip because the bindings failed to release because they were old.
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm happy to say I did not have the skis tuned or anything I adjusted my bindings to the rental boot made sure they slid and jumped on the lift. I absolutely loved them they were way faster then the rentals I've been getting and they handled like I wanted the skis to handle I set the bindings perfectly, they released when I wanted them to (Having 0 knowledge about setting bindings) I'd say I did well in that part. But none the less I had fun, and even though I had to relearn to ski on them I learned fast.
post #23 of 26
popcorn.gif
post #24 of 26

Sibby, may I join you?

:popcorn 

post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
I actually left some things out these "old craked" skis taught me how to "parallel" stop really well IMO.I have skied the same rental skis up till yesterday and "pizza" stopping worked well for the rentals but I could never parallel stop I would just turn really hard.The other thing that I loved with my cracked up skis was I could "drift"(put my skis at an angle but still move mostly straight) Either way again I still had lots of fun the only down side to this time was I wore the wrong socks so it feels like I was stepping on a small fine grate or screen so I'm a little raw from that.
post #26 of 26

Good for you! You can learn a lot on older (free!) equipment. You will learn how to adjust bindings and inspect them carefully (my bindings like yours just broke a small plastic tab rendering them quite unsafe so you do need to be vigilant - but that's also true of a new binding). You will learn how to inspect and monitor the condition of your skis. Flex the skis regularly with your hands to get a feel for the skis and track any changes. Check for pulled out bindings. Check for sharp edges. Since the skis are free, you can't ruin the value of the skis by learning to tune them. As long as you are learning, getting better, staying healthy and having fun, great!

 

The posters here are also right. With an unlimited budget you will learn faster and safer. But the old stuff you have is safer and better than what we learned on. Still, move to new modern equipment as soon as possible. Start with boots (that fit and flex to your satisfaction). 

 

Eric

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