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Boot Flex Question - When is it time to go stiffer?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

This is the 2nd season I'm in my current boots Salomon xPro 100, prior to these boots I rented. These boots fit great last season but this season the support was lacking but this has been addressed in the following post:  http://www.epicski.com/t/132881/ski-boots-stopped-fitting-properly-after-break-in

 

My question is, how do you know when to increase your flex?  Last year I was a progressing level 5 skier, this year I'm a strong level 7 skiing the entire mountain including double blacks.

 

In the back of my boot is a setting "sport" and "performance".  I called Salomon to inquire the actual rating of these settings, "sport" is the boot's default and it is set to 100 flex.  The "performance" setting will add 10 flex making the boot a 110 flex.

 

When I'm home or in the store under normal temperature (65-75 degree's F), I can flex the boot properly - per the 4 boot fitters that worked on the fit of these boots, I'm not under flexing the boot, nor am I over flexing the boot.  The Atomic Hawx 110 felt almost identical to me when I tried them on in the store in comparison.

 

When I am skiing in my Salomon xPro 100 set in "sport" (100 flex)- 

* If I am cruising around at slower speeds I'm a happy camper

* If I'm charging down full throttle, the boot responds very well but if conditions are icy or I'm really pointing the skis downhill, I sometimes wish they were slightly stiffer but only at really fast speeds

 

What do you recommend?  I'm afraid if the boots are too stiff then I will have a difficult time leisurely skiing the times I need to with the significant other, or simply dodging people on crowded slopes.

post #2 of 4

It would be helpful to know how much you weigh?

 

The difference for you would be better rebound from the boot and overall support, which should lead to a little less fatigue while skiing.

 

I would recommend that you stiffen the boot up, it should help, Keep in mind that a stiffer boot requires that you ski in a centered up (stacked) position---if you find that the stiffer boots seams to through you off balance to the rear, then your center of mass position is not correct, which can be influenced by several factors----boot board angle, delta angle, size of the boot, forward lean of the boot and calf circumference.  those are a bunch of factors any one of which can adversely affect you.

 

Good luck getting sorted out.

 

mike

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post
 

It would be helpful to know how much you weigh?

 

The difference for you would be better rebound from the boot and overall support, which should lead to a little less fatigue while skiing.

 

I would recommend that you stiffen the boot up, it should help, Keep in mind that a stiffer boot requires that you ski in a centered up (stacked) position---if you find that the stiffer boots seams to through you off balance to the rear, then your center of mass position is not correct, which can be influenced by several factors----boot board angle, delta angle, size of the boot, forward lean of the boot and calf circumference.  those are a bunch of factors any one of which can adversely affect you.

 

Good luck getting sorted out.

 

mike

 

5'10" (176cm exact height), 185 lbs, skiing on 171cm full rocker skies 81 width.

post #4 of 4

What size boots? what size feet in centimeters?  What circumference calf at the top of the liner?

 

have you done a "shell check"---if so how much room behind your heel in the shell?

 

Fore/aft balance problems are why so many ski in the back seat---- and not getting everything set up correctly is the reason.

 

Very few human beings have the correct "dimensions/morphology/anatomy" to ski efficiently in a boot right out of the box.  The boots need to be adjusted so that they work for you, just like they worked for the skier they were designed around.  If you happen to have that skiers shape---morphology you can ski as efficiently, otherwise you have to "compensate".

 

A softer boot will not penalize you as much if you are compensating but it also won't reward you because you are compensating.

 

If your calf muscle is 1 inch larger in circumference that the size of the skiers leg that the boot was designed for, your knees will be 8.1mm further forward over the boot sole than that skiers,(you will overload the front of the ski and sit back) and vice versa if you have 1 inch less circumference your knees will be 8.1mm further back ( you will overload the heel of the boot and ski the back of the ski).  This will cause you to compensate.

 

Compensate defined: to make up for (something unwelcome or unpleasant) by exerting an opposite force or effect.  

 

That does not sound like too much fun to me:(!!!

 

mike

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