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Blisters

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I'm new to the BC scene and Touring and the few times I've gone out I got some nasty blisters on the Achilles areas of my feet. I'm using Solomon quest AT boots, marker baron bindings and élan chainsaw skis in 182's, not the lightest set up but figured in would be suffice for resort and Touring. Some suggest I may need a thinner sock or a better lining in my boot or even the heel pocket in my boot. Or does the skin in that area just need to harden a bit with more use from touring. Would a lighter set up help? Would like some feedback.
post #2 of 13
Maybe do what you would do for summer hiking? Put some "moleskin" on the spot that rubs before problems develop.

I don't do AT but for in bounds boot packs in regular alpine boots I find loosening to make walking more comfortable increases the chance of hot spots or blisters, especially if I overheat. Better to leave them tight.
post #3 of 13
1: Be sure your boots fit well and that your foot isn't slopping around.

2: Tighten the strap across your instep enough so that your foot is held securely while skinning and isn't slopping around.

Blisters are caused by friction, which is caused by movement of one surface against another. Eliminate either the movement or the contact and the friction goes away. With boots, eliminating the movement of the foot against the boot is your best bet.
post #4 of 13

If there's too much slop, you might need better fitting boots, or a new boot liner better molded/fit. 

 

If it's a small area of movement-- I bet almost all of us who skin have some movement of the foot, even if its imperceptible when it happens, specially in the heel area-- a small piece of athletic tape on the heel does the trick.

 

I get one spot on the side of my heel near the achilles insertion that sometimes bothers me when I skin up more than ~600 height-meters (a rubbing that can slightly blister/redden), specially if it's the first skin or two of the season (the skin hardens a bit after a while). A 1-2 inch strip of athletic tape does it. I love the fit of my boots.

post #5 of 13


Ultrathin for blister pro, 3mm for packed out liners/bad heel hold and blister pro:

http://www.ezeefitsports.com/category-s/1827.htm

 

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Just ordered one, looks like that will solve the problem. Tks all for the input
post #7 of 13
I use duct tape on my heel for long day tours. It works great. I carry a extra duct tape in my pack in case I get a hot spot on the trail
post #8 of 13

I use 3M Transpore surgical tape, the wide one. It's breathable, water-resistant and generally always stays on.  I use it to prevent blisters sometimes but it's also good once you have them.  Just another alternative to keep in mind.

post #9 of 13

Keep your boots on as tight as when you are skiing in them. As mentioned if you loosen em up any that extra room results in rubbing and blisters. 

 

If they are tight and you are getting blisters they probably don't fit you very well. A good boot fitter might be able to help with that but imo they probably won't ever be as good as a properly fit boot. 

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
 

Keep your boots on as tight as when you are skiing in them. As mentioned if you loosen em up any that extra room results in rubbing and blisters. 

 

If they are tight and you are getting blisters they probably don't fit you very well. A good boot fitter might be able to help with that but imo they probably won't ever be as good as a properly fit boot. 

 

Most people I know loosen their boots when they tour. A lot of boots, particularly those designed for ski + hike (not really pure touring boots) and use in frame-style touring bindings (non-tech), are designed to have the top buckles moved into hike mode... which loosens the boot. 

 

It's obviously the best solution to have a boot with no movement when you're touring, but it can be difficult/impossible for even a skilled bootfitter to eliminate that tiniest bit of move, or even just pressure change, on the bony part of the achilles attachment on such setups. Or it could take dozens of fitting trips. The solution is super easy, and cheap: a bit of your favorite tape/moleskin. 

post #11 of 13

Yeah I can only tour in my TLT5's if they are loosened up.  The key is not too much as you don't want your foot moving, but it is nice to let the feet relax while you are walking uphill  Toughen your feet, new socks every day (changing socks during the day if possible helps), long days are worse than short days, moistness and friction cause blisters, protect the foot in what works for you-I have used tape, but might try the link above.  Wash and clean your feet afterwards.  I buy something like this at my local outdoor shop for after blisters.  http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-GlacierGel-Dressing/dp/B00169962W

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

Yeah I can only tour in my TLT5's if they are loosened up.  The key is not too much as you don't want your foot moving, but it is nice to let the feet relax while you are walking uphill  Toughen your feet, new socks every day (changing socks during the day if possible helps), long days are worse than short days, moistness and friction cause blisters, protect the foot in what works for you-I have used tape, but might try the link above.  Wash and clean your feet afterwards.  I buy something like this at my local outdoor shop for after blisters.  http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-GlacierGel-Dressing/dp/B00169962W


The designers of the TLT5 series suggest that the user set the lower buckle such that the heel is kept snug and that there is no undue pressure on the top of the foot, then don't change it (unless of course you put the accessory tongue in).   The upper buckle is designed to be totally loose while skinning; I never skinned with the accessory tongue in (and didn't use it much skiing down); and I removed the power straps completely (and would add Booster Straps if I felt I needed it for going down).

 

As you and Bob Lee suggested above, the skiers foot should not be moving inside the boot--not only will that cause blisters it will wear holes in the liners.  And as many point out, a poor fit may lead to the necessity of loosening the lower buckle most of the time or not being able to tighten the lower buckle properly to stop movement.

 

For some it takes some exploration and practice to develop the proper striding technique, keeping the ski on the snow, keeping the foot relaxed in the boot (not flexing), just lifting the heel enough to get the ski to slide forward and then giving just a little kick to lenghten the stride ...

post #13 of 13

Some people swear by BodyGlide - rub it on prior to going out.  I've tried BodyGlide, Moleskin, Duct tape, liner socks, boots tight, boots loose - none of them worked completely for me. Trying a new pair of AT boots this year - we'll see what happens.

 

 

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