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Short Turns MA - Page 2

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 

Time for last one update to this MA. A few weeks ago, I had an excellent lesson with @LiquidFeet. The three big things that came out of the lesson were upper lower body separation (she said I should pull back the outside hip and feel a pinch, I think this is the best thing I've been able to keep since the lesson), pulling the inside leg/foot back (do I have less tip lead?), and planting the poll earlier (she wanted me to plant at the end of the turn).

 

So how am I doing now? I think it's a pretty good improvement from the first videos in this thread. If there's one thing I would critique is that it looks like the top of the turn looks rushed. I'm partially going to blame that on the ice. I think it is something I do commonly though.

 

Also want to hear from @surfdog and @vindibona1 again.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBSXoBZkSaA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoF-JLpMSa0

post #32 of 38

You are steering more progressively through the turn now, which improves your turn shape and speed control. You need even more. 

 

See my earlier post on creating early natural balance over the outside ski. Once you create natural balance at the top of the turn, you'll have far better steering through the top, and it'll pay dividends in the middle and bottom of the turn (your edge hold will improve 300%). Flexing the inside and extending the outside progressively will also improve your separation. 

 

Tip lead is usually just a symptom, not a cause. It doesn't crop up here, but previously it was because of the lack of natural balance over the outside ski.

post #33 of 38

Hey Nem...

 

An improvement for sure.   At first blush I see two things. In the first video, particularly your first turn you are a little sequential. You can spot the very brief 1-2 action at 0:11 as well.  Not such a big deal and I won't belabor the point because it is tangentially related to my second point. 

 

Your timing of flexion and extension isn't refined yet.  If you think about how turn shape and where you are within the turn shape affects pressure, think about the last part of the turn. It has the most pressure naturally, no?  After all, the general direction of travel is down the fall line, momentum is carrying you in that direction as well while the skis turn out of the fall line. So, is that a point to add pressure, or is that where you have to manage pressure and start relieving the excess pressure, begin transitioning release/initiation and retracting your legs so you have "headroom" (actually leg room) to extend them as you enter the next turn?   In other words, you keep pressing the ski too long in the last part of the turn when in fact the natural forces will create and/or maintain the pressure as you transition and you can start retracting earlier so there is a constant motion of extension and retraction (flexion).  I'm going to stop here for simplicity's sake and hope you get the picture. 

 

BTW... did you get a photo of LF to share?

post #34 of 38

Nemesis256, I am going to ditto everything in Metaphor's assessment.  I would add that along with establishing that early balance, you establish your edge above the fall line and a rounded turn shape will be the result.  The flat spot where your skis go straight will go away.  And if you establish your balance over the new outside ski at the top and maintain that through the turn, good things will result.

 

You have made obvious improvements.  But you are still too inside ski dominant.  Your pole plant or movement should lead the new directional change by moving forward and diagonally into the new turn.  Your directional movement is mostly up rather than forward.  Your hands only go far before they stop, so they are not doing enough to move your upper body in the direction of the new turn. 

 

I would want to work with you on repetitive drills that get you to balance over the outside and drive that into muscle memory - until it becomes the natural place for you to balance.

 

Lessons are dropping off, so LF and I spent some time skiing together at Cannon.  Firm, fast, and fun today.  I don't have any pictures, but I can tell you she is a gem.  :)

post #35 of 38
[Hunts for topical Garfield-esque emoticon and fails to find.]
post #36 of 38

Qcanoe, I am afraid that I may have left an impression that I in no way intended, and that concerns me - given your oblique comment.  I have been teaching with LF at Cannon for about 3 years and we have a friendly relationship.   She is an interesting, enjoyable, and unique human being.  It is always fun to ski with her.  That is all I meant by my comment.  

post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfdog View Post
 

Qcanoe, I am afraid that I may have left an impression that I in no way intended, and that concerns me - given your oblique comment.  I have been teaching with LF at Cannon for about 3 years and we have a friendly relationship.   She is an interesting, enjoyable, and unique human being.  It is always fun to ski with her.  That is all I meant by my comment.  

 

Trouble not! We are on the same page, totally! 

 

OMG, the internet is a pain sometimes.  :)

post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfdog View Post
 

Qcanoe, I am afraid that I may have left an impression that I in no way intended, and that concerns me - given your oblique comment.  I have been teaching with LF at Cannon for about 3 years and we have a friendly relationship.   She is an interesting, enjoyable, and unique human being.  It is always fun to ski with her.  That is all I meant by my comment.  

 

Trouble not! We are on the same page, totally! 

 

OMG, the internet is a pain sometimes.  :)

 

In fact even thinking about visiting you guys sometime before the end of the season comes. I have a Cannon voucher burning a hole in my ski pants pocket.

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