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How do I learn this style?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I see people skiing with their weight evenly distributed on both skis, not dynamically shifting their weight from left to right as I do.
Any suggestions on how to learn that technique? It looks slow and stable, and I'd like to try it.
post #2 of 16

Ski deep powder with skinny skis.  That'll learn ya. :)

post #3 of 16
It might help if you posted a video of what you are seeing.
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

I see people skiing with their weight evenly distributed on both skis, not dynamically shifting their weight from left to right as I do.
Any suggestions on how to learn that technique? It looks slow and stable, and I'd like to try it.

I don't think what you are seeing is what they are doing. You are probably seeing people with both their skis following parallel paths and it appears both are equally weighted, however this is not the case. The only time skis (usually) are equally weighted is at transition. After that, they are decreasing the weight on what is to be the new inside ski and increasing the weight on the new outside ski.

Drills for this could be (depending on starting skiing style and skill level):

Shuffle turns staying in dynamic balance

Shorten the going to be inside ski to initiate the turn

Lift the inside ski

Up and over

Make smiley faces with the inside ski's tip (tail is off the ground)

Ken
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

I see people skiing with their weight evenly distributed on both skis, not dynamically shifting their weight from left to right as I do.
Any suggestions on how to learn that technique? It looks slow and stable, and I'd like to try it.

 

I do that all the time - It's call a wedge.

post #6 of 16
Let me get this straight: you now shift weight from outside ski to outside ski, but you want to learn the "technique" of keeping weight akways equally on both skis?
post #7 of 16
The question is so strange, that I feel sure we are misunderstanding it. That's why I asked for a video.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The question is so strange, that I feel sure we are misunderstanding it. That's why I asked for a video.

Oh. I thought it was a back handed comment about his other thread where he was "seeing" things. I keep forgetting how much nicer you are than I am tongue.gif
post #9 of 16

A wedge is certainly one way have the weight evenly distributed and get slow and stable results. However, my guess is that what you are seeing is people who are balancing against their outside skis, but not going fast enough to make the weight transfer from ski to ski very noticeable. The key to this "style" is let the skis turn you more than you turning the skis. To do this you need to develop the skill of being able to smoothly tip your skis on and off their edges while also managing the pressure along the length of the ski during the turns (i.e. a sense of moving slightly forward at the beginning of the turns and moving slightly backward at the end). Please note that at higher levels of skill (i.e. steeper pitches and faster speeds), you will see this style produce a noticeable weight shift on groomed terrain. In moguls and powder, higher level skiers adjust their technique so that their weight is more evenly balanced than on groomed terrain. Please note that lateral weighting your skis only as a result of turning forces or changing the weight to achieve a specific purpose is a style choice. An expert skier has the option to choose either style.

post #10 of 16

There is 2 footed skiing but almost never are both skis actually weighted equally.  Generally it's  the inside edge of the outside ski that bears bears most of the weight.  2 footed skiing works best in soft snow and I do it quite a bit in powder and soft spring conditions.  When conditions are firm you want your weight on that outside ski.

post #11 of 16
OK so you wanna two ski... try holding your ski poles behind your knees down low and pulled up tight just below ham strings. Don't lose contact and remember to steer your inside ski in the same direction as your weight beating outside ski. Remember start slow and keep your head up.
post #12 of 16
Narrow your stance and upunweight your turninitiation.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Narrow your stance and upunweight your turninitiation.

he means this, if you needed a visual:

 

:Ott 

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
OK, I can relate to that. I very clearly remember UP unweighting and DOWN unweighting from my days on long straight skis.
post #15 of 16
The drill I suggested will not promote up down as much as it stop "back seat turns" and will promote the alignment of the lower joints. Furthermore it will stop the inside hip from falling in. Using the hip to turn these easy carving skiis is detracting the fundamental use of lower legs to bend the ski while keeping the center of mass ahead of the skis center.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

he means this, if you needed a visual:

 

:Ott 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

OK, I can relate to that. I very clearly remember UP unweighting and DOWN unweighting from my days on long straight skis.

 

Thanks razie for a visual. Phlogiston, the UP/Down unweighting never whent away. Its just that its been lost due to the carving / park / freestyle / phat ski - revolution. However, its still valid technique. This thread for example proves it in many ways.

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