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Skis for dust on crust

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

What skis do you bring when if finally starts snowing (lightly) after a long dry spell and the surface is refrozen groomed and bumps under a couple inches of new?

 

Narrow hard snow skis and pretend it was like yesterday?

 

"Carvy" fat skis that slice through the new snow on edge and float a little when flat?

 

"Slarvy" fat skis, hoping to float/smear on the new snow?

post #2 of 15
Two inches? Skis for the stuff underneath. Four inches? Depending on consistency, might change my mind, depends on the ski.

That sounds more like dust on cement to me. Crust implies that underneath there's something else. I know that here this year, it's just cement.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

How about dust on marble, cement and crusty bumps?

post #4 of 15
Carve skis.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utagonian View Post
 

How about dust on marble, cement and crusty bumps?

 

Damp and carvy, not too terribly stiff.     How much softer than stiff?    Must be able to intentionally skid and bend  tip & tail without ground reaction force to help. 

post #6 of 15

I just spent most of the day in conditions like that on a pair of 177cm Nordica Enforcers, the prototype version.  They were great.  I had tried the 169cm version at Copper Mountain wasn't terribly impressed but it could have been the tune.  The 177s today were pure gold.  There was anywhere from 2" to 4" of fresh snow and still snowing with piles of loose snow as well as some crud on all but one run I skied.  Underneath was pretty much like concrete.  The Enforcers held an edge quite well, blasted through the piles of loose snow and crud with no hesitation, turned on a quarter(I'm not fast enough for a dime) and are absolutely the best ~100mm ski I've ever been on in the bumps.  The shape of the tail allows it to release quickly and easily out of every turn.  I was skiing by myself so I didn't go into the trees, but I'm confident they would be fine in the trees.  I'm only 5'7" 150 pounds and was concerned that they might be too long and too stiff, but they were not.  If I was forced to own only one ski, this would probably be it


Edited by mtcyclist - 2/20/15 at 2:37pm
post #7 of 15

I would take stiff racing skis, or my Volant Machetes.  Unless there was more than 6 inches of "dust".

post #8 of 15

I feel this is the exact condition that skis like the bonafide/ mantra/ et al. Skis that can grip on ice but some float on soft with the ability to smear. Pretty fun going fast on smooth surfaces and nimble enough to handle refrozen ungroomed without being a chore.

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

Well, we ended up with 1-3" of new over the hard pack.  I took two pair.  One wide and one narrow.  The old, 64mm under foot GS race skis were the right tool for the job.  Big fun all day.  The combination of edge grip, stability and dampness won out.

 

I switched out to some Stormrider Pro's (105 under foot, smooth, damp and excellent carvers) for a few runs mid day.  They were good but really, no contest, the race skis were great.

 

Thanks all.


Edited by Utagonian - 2/20/15 at 3:42pm
post #10 of 15

Utagonian,

Where did you ski today?  I'm making an assumption that your name may mean you are a Utah skier.  No new snow here up at the northern resorts but I just watched the weather and they said Alta had 3" through the day.

Cheers,

Shawn

post #11 of 15

Yeah I was gonna vote for GS skis. Can be surprisingly effective in light crud over ice as long as you stay on them. 

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn W Satch View Post
 

Utagonian,

Where did you ski today?  I'm making an assumption that your name may mean you are a Utah skier.  No new snow here up at the northern resorts but I just watched the weather and they said Alta had 3" through the day.

Cheers,

Shawn

 

Deer Valley

post #13 of 15

Sometimes the toughest situation is when there is enough fairly dense snow that your edges don't bite into the underlying firm--instead the soft snow you're riding in slides on the ice layer. In that situation it doesn't matter what you ski--it's the snow that isn't gripping, not the ski.

post #14 of 15

Dust on crust suxs no matter what ski you use. :D

 

If there are moguls under, a forgiving ski that still holds a good edge helps.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Sometimes the toughest situation is when there is enough fairly dense snow that your edges don't bite into the underlying firm--instead the soft snow you're riding in slides on the ice layer. In that situation it doesn't matter what you ski--it's the snow that isn't gripping, not the ski.

 

 

That's when I *really* like Whiteroom's Mantra-type suggestion.

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