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Share your clever ideas and good things you do here.

post #1 of 215
Thread Starter 
Share your clever ideas and good things to do here. It can be anything about the sport, lunch, driving, ski prep, you name it.
For starters; wipe your skis down with a rag or old towel to keep the edges from rusting.
I have a small step ladder about 18” that I use to make it easier to get into my roof box.
Carry a small snow shovel in case you get stuck in the snow.
I carry a whistle in case I get hurt or stuck in the trees.
post #2 of 215

Bring some food such as granola bars for the lift, (no need to stop for lunch!)

post #3 of 215

Don't buy $100+ ski gloves. A pair of Kinco cold weather work gloves and a tin of Sno-Seal works just as well, for a fraction of the price. If it's really cold, a pair of glove liners inside the Kincos will beat even the coldest days. And the Sno-Seal will waterproof multiple gloves, your boots, your shoes, anything leather. And the Kincos stand up to much more of a beating than 99% of ski gloves. 

post #4 of 215

+1 on Kincos.  I have both the gloves and the mittens.  Total $30 + tax

 

Bring more than a shovel in your car.  Bring some warm blankets or sleeping bags.  I leave some in my car all winter along with matches.  I guess it depends on what part of the country you are in, but I have been stopped on the road for over 3 hours waiting for DOT to shoot and clear avalanches.

 

On cold days keep your cell phone and camera in a pocket with a hand warmer or 2.  Cold sucks the life out of batteries.

 

Skiing with kids, carry some candy in your pocket - can make all the difference in getting them down the hill in the late afternoon when they run out of gas.

post #5 of 215
Airplane mode the phone while skiing.
Always pack a clif bar.
Find a table before buying lunch.
Use singles line on busy days.
post #6 of 215
Put on a clean fresh pair of socks on when booting up.
post #7 of 215

Boots on the floorboard by the heat in the car on the way to the hill. Keeps them nice and warm for the boot-up.

post #8 of 215

If you wear a backpack, keep Clif bars/granola bars in a pocket close to your body. Keeps them warm and soft. Nothing worse than pulling a Clif bar out of your backpack and chipping your teeth on it because it's frozen solid.

post #9 of 215

For the days when booting up at the car with a long walk to the base is inevitable wear cat tracks/yak tracks to protect your boot lugs, but hang them using a cable lock on the rack at the base lodge instead of trying to stuff them in your pocket while skiing.  I've been doing that for over five years now and nobody's ever messed with them.  Almost forgot to get them on the way out once but slipping and almost falling reminded me to go back and get them and my lock. Some folks spend a lot of money and time getting their boots just right.  There is also valuable ski time lost when you have to find a place in the base early morning to boot up, stash your street shoes, etc.. then again at the end of the day.  That's at least 15 minutes of your ski day that booting up at the car can save.

post #10 of 215

Buy a whole rotisserie chicken and put it in the back of the truck before booting up.  Cold chicken lunch later.  Be sure to ask the store for some thin gloves, no mess.

post #11 of 215
If you keep your boots some place cold such as the garage, bring them inside the night before so the liners get up to room temperature. Putting on a boot with cold liners makes it more likely that your toes will get cold.
post #12 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

wipe your skis down with a rag or old towel to keep the edges from rusting.

 Similarly, when it's too cold for snow to melt on your skis, use a brush to remove the snow before packing. I use the brush you would use to remove snow off your car. That way there's less snow to melt to make your edges wet.

post #13 of 215
Heated boot bag for those who have long drives. A little baby powder or silicone spray makes sliding your foot into a cold, stiff boot easier.
post #14 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

If you keep your boots some place cold such as the garage, bring them inside the night before so the liners get up to room temperature. Putting on a boot with cold liners makes it more likely that your toes will get cold.


NEVER store your boots in the garage or anyplace cold. If you do, we can't be friends. :nono:

post #15 of 215

Meet a hot girl (or guy as the case may be), marry her (him) and get them to like skiing:D

post #16 of 215

To @jgiddyup 's post. 

Do what you love with someone you love. 

 

post #17 of 215

Okay, next point.....

Always have a goggle wipe in your pocket, and/or a spare pair of goggles in your pocket.  

I've had one of those nasty falls when my goggles got packed with snow....made for a miserable rest of the day with lousy visibility. 

 

 

Also, take your goggles out and let them air out thoroughly over night so you have a better chance of no fogging the next day. 

post #18 of 215

Make sure you walk around the lodge a bit to warm up on bitter cold days before going to the bathroom.  It makes it easier to find your package if your blessed with the Irish curse.:eek

post #19 of 215

Leave a bag packed with anything you might need while skiing - face masks, glove liners, mittens, turtle fleece, extra goggles, etc.  That way you can just throw it in the vehicle every time.  You won't find yourself at the mountain thinking "oh crud, I forgot a ....."

post #20 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustski View Post
 

Leave a bag packed with anything you might need while skiing - face masks, glove liners, mittens, turtle fleece, extra goggles, etc.  That way you can just throw it in the vehicle every time.  You won't find yourself at the mountain thinking "oh crud, I forgot a ....."

That's exactly what I do. A big duffel bag with socks, shells, sweaters, jackets, gloves, and boots and helmet/goggles too. I throw it in the car on the way up and then once I get to the mountain I can add to my base layer for whatever is best for the conditions. And then I can easily change clothes in the middle of the day if conditions change.

post #21 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

To @jgiddyup 's post. 

Do what you love with someone you love. 

 

Always go for the cheap feel in the photoshoot. 

post #22 of 215

Don't flail around with your skis and poles in the parking lot.  Just slip your pole straps over the tip and tail of your skis, and you can use your ski poles as a handle!

 

Big thick heavy cotton socks are really underrated as ski socks and are much cheaper than socks labeled as ski socks. 

 

If you want to ride a chair alone, go up the line with a group to fill a chair, and just don't go when the other group steps out. The guys behind you have already made up a chair, so you are home free to snag the next chair all to your lonesome!

 

The best way to teach a beginner is to get them clicked into the skis and bring them to the summit. The long runs will give them the needed practice. 

post #23 of 215
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustski View Post

Leave a bag packed with anything you might need while skiing - face masks, glove liners, mittens, turtle fleece, extra goggles, etc.  That way you can just throw it in the vehicle every time.  You won't find yourself at the mountain thinking "oh crud, I forgot a ....."


 



I always do that.
Lots of good ideas some I will have to try.
post #24 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustski View Post
 

Leave a bag packed with anything you might need while skiing - face masks, glove liners, mittens, turtle fleece, extra goggles, etc.  That way you can just throw it in the vehicle every time.  You won't find yourself at the mountain thinking "oh crud, I forgot a ....."


Dad and each kid has their own boot bag with socks, gloves, neck gaitors, helmets, goggles.  Kids are forbidden from taking boot bag items out for everyday use so to ensure they are ready to go skiing at all times.  Dad also has a small first aid kid and emergency tuning supplies like a scraper, p-tex candle, and lighter in his boot bag.

post #25 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
 A little baby powder or silicone spray makes sliding your foot into a cold, stiff boot easier.

 

+1 on silicone spray for boot entry/exit.

post #26 of 215
post #27 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaconMeCrazy View Post

Put on a clean fresh pair of socks on when booting up.


Don't take your boots off at lunch - please.

 

My vehicle still has a Y2K survival kit.

    One piece is a candle in a can - It will keep me warm if the car gets stuck for a while.  Or until it burns out at Y3K.

post #28 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Heated boot bag for those who have long drives. A little baby powder or silicone spray makes sliding your foot into a cold, stiff boot easier.

I don't have a heated boot bag, but I don't have far to go, either. I warm my boots in front of the fireplace at home, then slip a hot-water bottle into my boot bag, and fill any empty space with a spare vest or jacket. The boots are toasty warm after my five-minute walk to the hill, no matter how cold the weather is. If you start out with warm feet, you'll probably feel good all day. Start out cold, and you're probably miserable all day.

post #29 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Don't flail around with your skis and poles in the parking lot.  Just slip your pole straps over the tip and tail of your skis, and you can use your ski poles as a handle!

 

Big thick heavy cotton socks are really underrated as ski socks and are much cheaper than socks labeled as ski socks.

 

If you want to ride a chair alone, go up the line with a group to fill a chair, and just don't go when the other group steps out. The guys behind you have already made up a chair, so you are home free to snag the next chair all to your lonesome!

 

The best way to teach a beginner is to get them clicked into the skis and bring them to the summit. The long runs will give them the needed practice.

and one of my favorites ........ on those beautiful sunny days, push up your helmet a bit to leave a nice space on your forehead above the goggles, to get that coveted "goggle tan".  Can't have enough vitamin D.

post #30 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiersLeft View Post
 

and one of my favorites ........ on those beautiful sunny days, push up your helmet a bit to leave a nice space on your forehead above the goggles, to get that coveted "goggle tan".  Can't have enough vitamin D.

Also, if it's really cold, lengthen your chin strap and perch that helmet on top of a really thick, warm hat. Extra insulation AND more paddiing.

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