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Has anyone tried the Foot Rope?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I came across this video in which Michael Rogan talks about the Foot Rope.  Its not entirely clear when/why it would be used.  I'm interested to hear what everyone thinks.

 

post #2 of 16
Hmm looks like something I will be interested it! Take my money!!!
post #3 of 16

I have never used it but I have seen it used in some clinics.  The idea is pretty simple: it forces you to maintain stance throughout your turn.  As he alludes to, it is not a great tool to use beyond moderate pitch or speed, but you can use it at lower speed and on a shallower pitch to help build more consistent stance.  The video explains it pretty well I think.

 

It's not a tool I would necessarily take out on a regular basis, but could be a great way to work through some persistent stance/balance issues on the lower end before amping up the dynamics.

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by day7 View Post
 

I have never used it but I have seen it used in some clinics.  The idea is pretty simple: it forces you to maintain stance throughout your turn.  As he alludes to, it is not a great tool to use beyond moderate pitch or speed, but you can use it at lower speed and on a shallower pitch to help build more consistent stance.  The video explains it pretty well I think.

 

It's not a tool I would necessarily take out on a regular basis, but could be a great way to work through some persistent stance/balance issues on the lower end before amping up the dynamics.

I feel like its not really going to teach you how to fix anything, but just call out issues with your stance.  If you feel the need to connect your feet with a rope, isn't it pretty likely that you are already aware of the problem?

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeFiter View Post
 

I feel like its not really going to teach you how to fix anything, but just call out issues with your stance.  If you feel the need to connect your feet with a rope, isn't it pretty likely that you are already aware of the problem?

People are quite often not aware of the exact movements they are making.  This is why video and an instructor's eye are so useful.  We often have a very different mental image of our skiing from the visual we truly present.  Seeing this difference helps us make changes and hopefully feel these changes in our bodies.

 

Tools like the rope are useful in building our kinesthetic awareness.  In the same way we can have a different mental picture of skiing from reality, we also feel ourselves to be in positions we are not.  Even if you have been told (or saw it on your own) to bring your feet closer together or move them farther apart, you may not know what that should feel like.  We will very often revert to habitual movement paterns.  

 

That is where a tool like this comes in handy.  You can force the issue (by fixing the feet where you want them) and in so doing allow the skier to feel the difference.  Once the skiers knows what it should feel like, the aid become less important, but the step of learning what to feel for and building that awareness can be hugely important.

 

This is certainly not a 'solve all your stance problems' tool nor am I sure how useful it would be without someone to give guidance.  I think it is best used by an instructor for a group or individual with some specific issues.  It is also not the only way to gain awareness of your body for these moves, but I have seen it work and can see how it could be very useful in certain circumstances.

post #6 of 16
IMO just another gimick...like an edgie wedgie for adults.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post

IMO just another gimick...like an edgie wedgie for adults.

Have you used it?

post #8 of 16
I can foresee injury lawsuit on this one.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Have you used it?
No. I dont need to. If someones boots arent canted and aligned for a stance width that coincides with the rope length it has more potential to create problems than fixes. Additionally it does not allow for foot width variation with increased angulation.

Edit: one more thing... From a feel an tactile perception it is just as likely to get used to the feel of the device moreso than the spacing it might provide. Additionally, foot spacing is as much a RESULT of other factors that need to be addressed rather than the foot spacing itself. Again, this is a case of teaching to the symptom rather than the root of the problem.
Edited by vindibona1 - 2/22/15 at 4:09am
post #10 of 16

No good.

 

We want a constant distance between the legs.  Not between the feet.  On the flat, yes, the feet should remain walking-width apart.  But on steeps, we need to retract the inside foot but still keep the legs a constant distance apart.  When ripping down a steep, the inside foot might be be alongside the outside knee, but the distance between the legs remains constant.

 

For a practice device on flats, get one of the dog bone shaped car wash sponges.  If you can carry that along without dropping it, you're doing well.

 

Here's Ted:

post #11 of 16
Michael says specifically steeps and high speeds would be a problem.

It's a tool to help with smooth movement and if you are constantly pushing your feet around or thrashing around, it will let you know. If you have smooth movements and clean transitions it should be "no problem"

As I watch the video again it occurs to me he's talking about it being an assessment tool more than a training device.

DC
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post

IMO just another gimick...like an edgie wedgie for adults.


And just think...I used to use an inner tube to keep my feet together.:D

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer View Post


And just think...I used to use an inner tube to keep my feet together.biggrin.gif

If we examine the cause of a stance that is too wide it comes down to two primary things: An over-active outside ski w/ under active inside ski, or poor canting/alignment. IMO while relying on such a device might keep the feet spaced apart will it help to teach foot function? I believe it wont, and the srudent will have to learn foot fuction post-device anyway, where just addessing proper mechanics directly should fix the problem without any sort of device.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
 If we examine the cause of a stance that is too wide

It probably comes down to poor instruction, often from an instructor that had a clinic a few years ago that told them to teach a stance that was shoulder width.  Of course there was never a reason for this wide stance except with boots that don't fit, but that was gospel then.  I've even had a clinic where the clinician insisted on equal width tracks--that required more width between legs during transition and less during the center of the turn when the inside leg was retracted.

post #15 of 16
Yes, it's a restrictive device since it doesn't allow for vertical separation...

For low intermediates crawling along a groomer in overly wide or overly narrow stances, perhaps a run or two (no more) with these would help create some physical awareness of a hip width stance...

I'm not altogether opposed, and I'm willing to reserve judgement until I see some results one way or another.

Isn't mike rogan a PSIA demo team member or something?
Edited by Metaphor_ - 2/26/15 at 11:24am
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Isn't mike rogan a PSIA demo team member or something?

I believe he is the Captain of the PSIA Alpine Team, and Director of Instruction at Ski Magazine.

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