or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

getting forward...

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

This is the main balance issue that I have. And perhaps that most people have because it is an unnatural act (compared to balance while walking). Are there any tricks/exercises that will tell me when I am forward enough? My neutral stance has equal weight between balls (of feet) and heels. Should I put most of my weight on the balls?

 

Should I wear a backpack with 30 lbs of rocks in it? (so I fall if I get in the back seat) Or should I hang 30 lbs of my chest to pull me forward? Or maybe someoneone knows of a service where you pay someone to ski behind you and blow an airhorn or shoot you with a paintball gun when you get in the back seat?

post #2 of 12

Skip the 30 lb stuff and just try and focus on shins into the front of the boots, knees bent and hands forward.  Reach out for each turn with your pole plant (kind of like really putting your balance forward)  I am always trying to turn with the tips of my skis, rather than the middle and certainly not the tails unless I am in deep powder on a reverse/reverse shaped ski.

post #3 of 12

when you push with the ball of foot, you are extending the ankle, which is taking the shin further away from the tongue of the boot. 

 

you want to be relaxed at the ankle, and flexing. as liv2ski says, pressing the shin into the tongue of the boot.  

 

Easy to practice at home with your boots on flexing the boot. then transfer then is easy slopes, then scale up. 

 

Even the pros get back seat sometimes. It's a constant battle. 

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwana View Post
 

This is the main balance issue that I have. And perhaps that most people have because it is an unnatural act (compared to balance while walking). Are there any tricks/exercises that will tell me when I am forward enough? My neutral stance has equal weight between balls (of feet) and heels. Should I put most of my weight on the balls?

 

Should I wear a backpack with 30 lbs of rocks in it? (so I fall if I get in the back seat) Or should I hang 30 lbs of my chest to pull me forward? Or maybe someoneone knows of a service where you pay someone to ski behind you and blow an airhorn or shoot you with a paintball gun when you get in the back seat?

Have you ever played a sport like basketball or baseball? 

 

In either basketball or baseball (I suppose almost any sport where there is offense/ defense), when playing defense you want to be balanced on your feet ready to move in any direction in response to the offense. Ready to react because you don't know if you will need to move forward or back, left or right... you just know you need to be balanced and ready to move. If you are on your heels you can't move efficiently, if you are falling forward you can't move efficiently. You need balance. Knees bent, feet apart and equally weighted, hands to the front body relaxed but at the ready, eyes up... take that feeling to the slopes and you will succeed.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwana View Post

Are there any tricks/exercises that will tell me when I am forward enough?

While you are in a turn, try to pick up your inside ski.

If you are standing on them right, you will be able to pick up the back of the ski and leave the tip on the snow. If you are in the back seat, it's hard to pick up the back of the ski because you are standing on it. So, the tip will come up instead.

I do that as a quick alignment check for myself all the time.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwana View Post
Should I wear a backpack with 30 lbs of rocks in it? (so I fall if I get in the back seat)

 

Ski bumps...when you get backseated you'll experience that equivalent.  It's a good drill for correcting balance issues that you can get away with on the flats.

post #7 of 12

I was an advanced intermediate and fond myself on a really steep run.  The steepest I ever had seen and steeper than anything I would have chosen to ski.  However, there I was and I knew that the only way I was not going to fall was to really commit my weight down the fall line.  I took that leap of faith.  I dove down the slope.  Miraculously, my skis help me up and I turned, whooping with glee down the face.  This one moment upped my level and changed my skiing life. It was not easy to summon the courage, but it was so worth it! 

 

Don't be like the tree that grows straight up out of the slope.  Think about keeping yourself at a 90 degree angle to the slope, or your skis if they were headed straight down.  The shovels of your skis will keep you from falling forward and your weight/balance will be on your shovels where it needs to be.  Yes you knees should be bent and you should be pressuring the tongues of your boots with your shins, but all that will come naturally if you can just commit your weight down the fall line and it is easier to really feel the difference that makes on a really steep slope.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post

While you are in a turn, try to pick up your inside ski.

If you are standing on them right, you will be able to pick up the back of the ski and leave the tip on the snow. If you are in the back seat, it's hard to pick up the back of the ski because you are standing on it. So, the tip will come up instead.

I do that as a quick alignment check for myself all the time.

^ this (start on a relatively flat run) and a was given a tip by a guide/instructor/coach of lifting up your toes slightly inside your boots - whcih seems to push your shin onto the tongue -ymmv.
post #9 of 12
On hard snow driving the ski shovels/flexing forward is imperative.
post #10 of 12

Doing hops during my transition has always been a fun drill to force me to get forward for the start of my next turn.   It's not something you want to do in your normal skiing but it gives you the feel of where you should be balance-wise at the start of a turn.

post #11 of 12

I've been working a lot on this with lessons over the past few years and one thing I notice, besides making better turns, red shins, and having less quad burn, is that when ever my skis leave the snow now the tips drop down first. I'm not talking about jumps, just little bumps or imperfections in chop or whatever. I think this is similar to the tip drill mentioned above. I'll have to try that one.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

thank you for some concrete, helpful and easy to implement drills. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion