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Any bombproof collapsible ski poles with great locking mechanism?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Can anyone recommend a good set of collapsible ski poles that are:

 

- durable

- splintable in case of breakage?

- locking mechanism that won't budge when mushing/skating with them or doing a hard pole plant, even after several seasons

- takes standard baskets

- relatively lightweight

 

Adjustability would be nice, but I feel like twist locks or clamp locks would lose effectiveness over time? Maybe something with a physical hard lock would be better, with the pole sections connected together by an elastic material or something?

post #2 of 18

Leki Peak Vario S Speedlock

post #3 of 18

I use http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/ski-poles/carbon-probe-ski-pole-BD111503_cfg.html#prefn1=bd_filter_tech_features&prefv1=FlickLock%C3%82%C2%AE+Pro&gclid=CjwKEAiAx4anBRDz6JLYjMDxoQYSJAA4loRmvcEJqE0E5wKFS-iBOxngGSzIL310nNFdFV6Zhz2GBBoCM3Pw_wcB&start=4

 

nice pole though I think the probe part is kind of a gimmick since you would not want to practice with it as I assume it would degrade the basket. Other then that it is a great pole, I used to be a freestyle bumper and still ski moguls hard and dont see any movement in the pole. Great weight and balance, love it. 

post #4 of 18
bd pure carbon! BD in general makes very good poles, I have both fixed and collapsible and beat the hell out of them and they just work!
post #5 of 18

BD's flick lock system is very solid. I don't find myself losing length with mine. The locking pressure is adjustable with a screw driver. I have the all aluminum traverses, at least 6 years old, no bending and I've run over them a couple of times with my car without damage (but I don't have studded tires). Not sure what you mean by standard baskets. Powder baskets and racing style baskets could both be considered standard. All BD poles have powder baskets. The distance between basket and tip is enough that the powder basket is never in the way. It does have one narrow side which you turn to the uphill side of the pole so that the basket doesn't glance off the snow when skiing something very steep. Not sure what would make one pole more splintable than another--that would seem to be an issue only if you were touring, and of course you would need to have something to splint it with. Otherwise throw the pole out when it breaks before you hurt yourself. As far as weight obviously carbon is lighter. 

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Cool, thanks guys. I'll be looking at BD poles then. 

post #7 of 18

Just be sure you buy ski-use poles; BD's ``trail'' poles are useless for skiing.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimintokyo View Post
 

Just be sure you buy ski-use poles; BD's ``trail'' poles are useless for skiing.

@jimintokyo , please expand on what you mean by "useless," thanks.

 

I have been hiking, backpacking, and skiing with the same pair of BD aluminum "Compact" adjustable 3 segment trail poles for the past 5 years, probably 250 days of use, since I try to be a minimalist. Love the flick lock and how well they pack in suitcase.  When I lost the bottom segment last winter, BD was fantastic in replacing it for merely $10. But this discussion thread really intrigues me.  I understand adjustable poles are not as "durable" as non-adjustable and 2 segment stronger than 3, etc.  But is this simply a theoretical consideration or has practical concerns?

 

May we also discuss aluminum vs. carbon poles in this thread also?  How important is pole weight for in-bound skiing?  Just for your amusement, I snapped friend's Gasherbrum II by a regular pole plant on a steeper hard pack run several years back, see photo.  So I have little confidence in carbon poles, totally skewed n=1.  

 

As I think more about sidecountry/BC touring, I'm now wondering: should I give carbon poles another try?  Thanks!  

 

brokenpole.jpg 1,972k .jpg file

post #9 of 18

Simple: flicklocks don't hold on the lightweight aluminum ``trail'' poles; one hard push and the flicklock gives way -- not every time, but often enough to matter. And it even happens occasionally on my wife's heavier-duty aluminum BDs.

post #10 of 18
Another vote for BD's locking mechanism. I have the aluminum ones and did manage to put a nice ding in them which renders the collapsability pretty useless so I presume that carbon would be more durable (well, except for @Rainbow Jenny's n=1). I use my BD skiing poles for hiking all the time. The baskets are removeable although they can be a bit fiddly to get on and off. 
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimmyt View Post
 

Black Diamond customer service by phone is quite helpful.  But you can easily replace middle or lower "shafts," as they are technically called, if you want it to be collapsable again, unless you dinged the upper shaft which they don't seem to offer the part.  I know they don't want people to order all the parts and build the complete pole.  

 

http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/hiking/spare-parts

 

Yes, I didn't thread the powder baskets in properly (between hiking and skiing seasons) and lost two early on.  Now I'm better about double checking and carrying spares.  

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimintokyo View Post
 

Simple: flicklocks don't hold on the lightweight aluminum ``trail'' poles; one hard push and the flicklock gives way -- not every time, but often enough to matter. And it even happens occasionally on my wife's heavier-duty aluminum BDs.

Just to let you know there is a screw you can tighten on the bd locking mechanism which should stop that travel. 

post #13 of 18

I bought a pair of BD aluminum poles a couple of years ago at Level Nine for something crazy like $29. Seemed like no way to lose on them. It turns out that I really like them, and they have become my primary pair. I like being able to play with a shorter length for bumps, and actually have gone to a slightly shorter length for general use. I've never had a problem with them collapsing on me. I just checked at the Level Nine website and don't see them. I guess they were on some kind of close-out. Should have bought two pairs.

post #14 of 18

I like BD poles and have been using them for years, but I like the way DPS Nori poles feel a little better:

http://www.epicski.com/t/112195/ski-pole-length/30#post_1487415

post #15 of 18

Leki Peak Vario Speedlock poles are durable and maintain the chosen length with their locking mechanism.

post #16 of 18

I have the Black Diamond and the Leki.  The "speedlock" on the Leki tends to slip on a hard pole plan/push, annoying.  The Black Diamond is superior IMHO.

post #17 of 18

Finally broke the tip off my BD Traverse poles, from whacking the snow off my boot soles. Replaced them with a pair with the carbon lower section, on the theory that it will keep me from whacking my boots with them and because I didn't like the lower grip on the current Traverses. (And as I rode down the funitel with one good pole I met a woman who had just lost the basket off her identical pair so I gave her mine. Some kind of karma I guess.) But what's with the garish colors? The poles I bought only come in green, which happens to match my jacket, which is embarrassing. I did replace the 4in baskets with 3 inch baskets, which are yellow, which is even worse. The new flic-lock design works fine. Note that this model comes in 2 lengths (short and long, not medium and super size--it's BD not McDonalds.)

post #18 of 18
I had the bd cf alpin poles, carbon, for 6 years, and I use them bc skiing, 30 + days a year.
Bomb proof.

I had the aluminum ones before, and they broke all the time.
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