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Getting serious about glades (todo list)

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
So growing up on the east coast and being a slighlty below average GS racer I never enjoyed bumps and never really sought out glades .

Now at 26 6'2" and 230lbs I am wishing I did them more in the past because I am definitely a rough glade skier .

I ski on average 18 days on the east coast 8 of which may have glades open (gore whiteface belleayre ) and about 13 days out west alta whistler and some other places .

I want to change this . I enjoy glades that are pitched at a green trail or easy blue pitch but anything steeper and I take forever to do them (my snowboarder friends probally did the really long glades at gore in about 1/3 of the time I did).

So help me put together a plan of attack to be a better glade skier .

Here's what my current plan of attack is
- drop my weight to 210 (loosing 10% of my weight should make me more nimble in the glades).
- maybe get a better glade ski ? (I have an experience 88 from last year , super 7s or maybe they are charge 7s the orange ones that I decided I can use all mountain after a trip to alta in jan, and volkl tigersharks these don't get much use ), maybe a smaller ski under foot that's more flexible might help me ?
- doing moguls on steeper pitches I figure if I can ski in between them without going over the top that's similar to glade sking
- try and sign up for the glades and glory camp at gore mountain but they only do it 2 times a year and I was at whistler for the previous one and the one coming up I have a bachelor party to goto .


What else should I add to my list ? I am a self taught groomer skier and I did ok as a GS racer in college against people with may more years experience .
post #2 of 22
I know people would think otherwise, but I tried the new br 9.0 and. It's pretty damn easy in the tree....
post #3 of 22

You talk about a GS racer, do you own a short radius turn ? That's the key to skiing in control in any conditions that you'll encounter.

Can you ski in control on a steep pitch going slow making short turns?

 

The ski is not the issue, IMO.

 

If you can make a short radius turn, I recommend a ski that has rocker tip and tail, with camber under foot and in the low 100'smm waist. Make sure the edges are sharp so you can use them in the icy spots. 

post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuik View Post

So growing up on the east coast and being a slighlty below average GS racer I never enjoyed bumps and never really sought out glades .

Now at 26 6'2" and 230lbs I am wishing I did them more in the past because I am definitely a rough glade skier .

I ski on average 18 days on the east coast 8 of which may have glades open (gore whiteface belleayre ) and about 13 days out west alta whistler and some other places .

I want to change this . I enjoy glades that are pitched at a green trail or easy blue pitch but anything steeper and I take forever to do them (my snowboarder friends probally did the really long glades at gore in about 1/3 of the time I did).

So help me put together a plan of attack to be a better glade skier .

Here's what my current plan of attack is
- drop my weight to 210 (loosing 10% of my weight should make me more nimble in the glades).
- maybe get a better glade ski ? (I have an experience 88 from last year , super 7s or maybe they are charge 7s the orange ones that I decided I can use all mountain after a trip to alta in jan, and volkl tigersharks these don't get much use ), maybe a smaller ski under foot that's more flexible might help me ?
- doing moguls on steeper pitches I figure if I can ski in between them without going over the top that's similar to glade sking
- try and sign up for the glades and glory camp at gore mountain but they only do it 2 times a year and I was at whistler for the previous one and the one coming up I have a bachelor party to goto .


What else should I add to my list ? I am a self taught groomer skier and I did ok as a GS racer in college against people with may more years experience .

 

Why don't you want to go over the top of the moguls?  That's where the good snow is.  Staying in the troughs is like trying to ski a bobsled track.

post #5 of 22

Your sig has a NJ Devils jersey so I assume you re on the east coast.  Gore has a Glades & Glory clinic coming up and that may be helpful.  I've never been to Gore, but I hear they do have some nice glades.  I have not heard any feedback if this clinic is worthwhile either, but it looks good and the price is right.  I was thinking of doing their Master the Mountain clinic,  Does anybody know if these clinics are good?

 

http://www.goremountain.com/events/glades-glory-skiing-snowboarding-clinics-0

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
No I don't think I do, my 178cm rossingnol experience 88s are the shortest radius, so I think that leaves something desired. I can switch skis with my friend who has a pair of shorter volkl rtm 73s and those are night and day easier in glades they get around so easy.

GS was also way easier for me to be competive. In slalom I always missed gates or just couldn't keep enough sleep through the turns ( ie starting. 2 gates behind someone they would pull away at every turn).

I ski in between moguls because I thought that's how your supposed to do them I thought going over the top is bad form? Mind you I don't know much about mogul skiing.


Yes I am I mentioned how I want to do the glades and glory I have a season pass to gore belleayre and whiteface but I was busy the two weekends they had it. They do have some amazing glade runs there the hardest run I have ever done in the trees was there but mind you out west I don't challenge myself in the glades enough because I know I'm mediocre.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
And for gores upcoming glades and glory clinic I'll be in vail.
post #8 of 22

One might think that some standard ski lessons might be more useful than new skis or glade-specific clinics.

post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuik View Post

No I don't think I do, my 178cm rossingnol experience 88s are the shortest radius, so I think that leaves something desired. I can switch skis with my friend who has a pair of shorter volkl rtm 73s and those are night and day easier in glades they get around so easy.

GS was also way easier for me to be competive. In slalom I always missed gates or just couldn't keep enough sleep through the turns ( ie starting. 2 gates behind someone they would pull away at every turn).

I ski in between moguls because I thought that's how your supposed to do them I thought going over the top is bad form? Mind you I don't know much about mogul skiing.


Yes I am I mentioned how I want to do the glades and glory I have a season pass to gore belleayre and whiteface but I was busy the two weekends they had it. They do have some amazing glade runs there the hardest run I have ever done in the trees was there but mind you out west I don't challenge myself in the glades enough because I know I'm mediocre.

 

Couldn't get enough sleep through the turns in slalom?  I'm guessing that's an amusing typo.  I tend not to fall asleep when I'm racing either.  ;)

 

Going over the top of a bump certainly isn't bad form.  Going through the troughs isn't necessarily bad form either.  It's all snow (or ice, as the case may be).  You need to have all bump options available in the trees as, well, the trees tend to get in the way.

post #10 of 22
Kevin, you are unique in my circle of ski friends as a very good skier who doesn't like trees. Are you changing your mind this year?

Your experience might help yuik. On the other hand, a procedure such as " 1) become a very good skier. 2) go into the woods. " might not be what he is looking for.
post #11 of 22

When there is snow in the troughs I tend to ski them.  When there is ice in the troughs I tend to turn on the tops.  There is more than one way to ski just about anything.  The very best glade skiing in the east, imo, is out of bounds at Jay or Stowe where you can get away from trees that have moguls between them and come closer to just plain tree skiing.  There are, I am sure, other ares with similar terrain - I am just not familiar with them yet. 

 

SInce you are a former racer, used to carving on firm surfaces, I would suggest working on quick, short radius turns in soft snow.  The whole point of skiing glades or trees is finding better, softer, fresher, and especially...hopefully - untracked snow!  (Aka: powder.)


Edited by crank - 2/18/15 at 8:52am
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Kevin, you are unique in my circle of ski friends as a very good skier who doesn't like trees. Are you changing your mind this year?

Your experience might help yuik. On the other hand, a procedure such as " 1) become a very good skier. 2) go into the woods. " might not be what he is looking for.

He likes them better now that he's been through our Saddleback trees boot camp. smile.gif (Sorry to put words in your mouth, Kevin, but couldn't resist the opening for a plug.)

But I agree that "been there recently" can be an opportunity for teaching in a relatable way.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post

 The whole pint of skiing glades or trees is finding better, softer, fresher, and especially...hopefully - untracked snow!  (Aka: powder.)

Disagree. Again. smile.gif The whole point of skiing trees is that it's fun. Better snow is often a bonus. I do agree, of course, that an icy bobsled run through the woods is yucky, and to be avoided. There are fifty shades of white in between that and powder though.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Kevin, you are unique in my circle of ski friends as a very good skier who doesn't like trees. Are you changing your mind this year?

Your experience might help yuik. On the other hand, a procedure such as " 1) become a very good skier. 2) go into the woods. " might not be what he is looking for.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


He likes them better now that he's been through our Saddleback trees boot camp. smile.gif (Sorry to put words in your mouth, Kevin, but couldn't resist the opening for a plug.)

But I agree that "been there recently" can be an opportunity for teaching in a relatable way.

 

:o

 

Have Patrons, will ski trees?   :D   Maybe call it an acquired taste?  The fact that the north-east has been getting a ton of snow this year hasn't hurt.  I've been working with @epic this season and we did a tree-skiing clinic the other day...  some technical fixes, some tactical changes / ideas / things to try.

 

Spent the better part of a day lapping one glade at Stowe the other day...  things are clicking a tiny bit...  i.e., I could link five or six turns in a row before having to bail, which is four or five more than I was previously able to make.  Baby steps!

 

So let's not go so far as to say "liking" trees -- at least not yet.  If there are powder bumps on the menu, I see no reason to dodge trees to get said powder.  Don't go hunting for good snow when you've already found it and all that.  Thumbs Up

 

I'm in no position to tell anybody how to ski trees, and probably not in bumps either, although I'd like to think I'm reasonably competent in bumps...  I do think that being reasonably confident on a variety of lines in bumps can't hurt and it's probably easier to learn bump skiing when there aren't trees in the way.  I probably biased my learning too much towards the "become good at bumps" factor to the detriment of "trees and bumps".

post #15 of 22
OP, two of us have mentioned "short radius turns" can you do a short radius turn ?




After I finally took lesson's and mastered that skill, it turely opened up the whole mountain to me.

I also chose my fat ski's, Volkl Shiro's as my new tree ski with all the fresh snow we've been getting, they are also fun in the natural bump trails, I can turn them anywhere I chose in the natural snow. even after its cut up. They will ski the big bumps on the front's, backs, top's bottoms. It does'nt matter, they will go over anything.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


Disagree. Again. smile.gif The whole point of skiing trees is that it's fun. Better snow is often a bonus. I do agree, of course, that an icy bobsled run through the woods is yucky, and to be avoided. There are fifty shades of white in between that and powder though.

 

You are free to disagree of course, but you are also wrong:cool   Of course as a confirmed power hound I may be far from subjective on this topic.

post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
I do agree, of course, that an icy bobsled run through the woods is yucky, and to be avoided. There are fifty shades of white in between that and powder though.

 

The icy bobsled runs in the trees can be fun. Just think of the sustained adrenaline flow. It all depends on your technique, tactic and predilection,  As you allured to in your reference to fifty shades, what most considered as pain can be pleasurable if done properly.   :cool

post #18 of 22

What is wrong with you people?

post #19 of 22

So, to summarize, we have:

@crank : powder is fun.  trees have powder.  therefore trees are fun.

@KingGrump : all conditions are fun.  Trees have all conditions.  Therefore trees are fun.

@qcanoe : trees have 50 different conditions, 49 of which are fun.  Therefore, there's a 98% chance that trees will be fun.

@KevinF : skiing bumps is fun.  Why dodge trees to get your bump skiing fix in?  <--- undergoing therapy.

 

:D

post #20 of 22

Gaining proficiency in skiing bumps will help you ski trees. But not just learning to ski them in a certain way. Learn to ski bumps in as many ways as you possibly can. The more variable and inconsistent the bumps, the better. That will better reflect what eastern trees are like. At the same time, make sure that the trees you're gaining proficiency in are suited to your needs. Not all tree runs are created equal. Pitch, tree density, underbrush, and obstacles make for very different tree experiences. Start by seeking out glades that have low pitch and widely spaced trees. As you get better with those, up the intensity slowly. Eventually, you'll be at the point of skiing steep trees much more proficiently. And while @crank may call it sacrilege, skiing tracked out trees is an excellent way to learn. When trees have been tracked out, you can see the paths people have already taken, and learn from the choices they've made. As you get better, you can pick your way from track to track, skipping around as you please. 

 

If you're going from Jersey to the 'Dacks, and you don't already have a season ticket, you may want to consider some trips to the northern Greens in Vermont. Due to weather patterns and terrain situation, the Greens generally get more snow and less wind than the Adirondacks. That translates to better tree skiing. Mad River Glen, Sugarbush, Stowe, Smuggs and Jay are all excellent places to get into the trees. 

 

As far as a tree ski goes, they're not necessary, but if you really are serious about getting off trail, a well suited ski is definitely a good idea. You don't have to reduce your ski length, but probably increase the width and go for something with tip and tail rocker. I'm shorter than you at 5'9", and weigh in at about 200lbs. I have two skis that are my go-to's for trees. One is an Icelantic Nomad RKR. It's a 181 in length, and 105 underfoot. That's more or less my everyday tree ski. My powder/deep snow tree ski is the K2 Obsethed in a 178, and that's 118 underfoot. Both skis have tip and tail rocker, with camber underfoot. So I would definitely not suggest going shorter, but rather look for something decently fat underfoot with some rocker.  

 

@KevinF - You're skiing trees willingly now? I'll be damned. 

post #21 of 22

I must say, I want my bumps without trees and I want my trees without bumps and I can't always get what I want.

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

@KevinF - You're skiing trees willingly now? I'll be damned. 
 

 

Yep, I'm apparently The Eighth Wonder of the Modern World.

 

Will miracles never cease! 

 

:)

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