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ski balancing tool at the local ski shop

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

A couple of decades ago I worked in a ski shop that had a balancing tool that acts like a mini teeter-totter (where the client stands on their skis and rocks back and forth until you find the middle point to mount the bindings). A local shop in my area (Hi Tempo in Minnesota) still has one of these. Sorry if this is a dumb question, but does this still have the same benefit with today's carving skis as it did back with the older straight skis?


thanks!

post #2 of 8

The name for that thing was the Campbell Ski Balancer.

As of 2002 it seemed to still be useful:

http://www.epicski.com/a/positioning-ski-bindings-using-the-campbell-balancer

I don't know of anyone studying its use on today's skis. 

post #3 of 8

Wonder how the Campbell balancer would work with a directional ski with tip rocker (most skis), where the widest part of the ski is forward of the front of the running surface of the flat ski. In such a case the center of the running surface depends on how much the ski is tipped, and will vary during the turn. So determining the center of the running surface is much more complicated than it used to be. 

post #4 of 8
Why is mounting them on the line so hard?
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

. In such a case the center of the running surface depends on how much the ski is tipped, and will vary during the turn. So determining the center of the running surface is much more complicated than it used to be. 

 

@Noodler has had some fun threads on the topic, such as here: 

http://www.epicski.com/t/97891/bof-mounting-point-method-for-the-21st-century
 

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

Why is mounting them on the line so hard?

 

I wasn't saying it was hard to mount based on the line, my question is if this balancing tool still has any relevance to today's shaped skis. Sorry if this was confusing.:rolleyes

post #7 of 8
Well, since skis have a pretty specific core profile, useing a fancy machine to decide where to mount when the ski designers think is the best place seems a bit overkill don't you think?
Thats assuming that its even valid to assume a ski being bent by a machine simulates ski forces.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

Well, since skis have a pretty specific core profile, useing a fancy machine to decide where to mount when the ski designers think is the best place seems a bit overkill don't you think?
Thats assuming that its even valid to assume a ski being bent by a machine simulates ski forces.

I'm not sure you understand how the machine works. It doesn't bend the ski. http://www.epicski.com/a/positioning-ski-bindings-using-the-campbell-balancer

The theory is that different body types have different balance points--to put it less euphemistically, some of us have bigger butts than others (In my case due to extremely powerful gluteus muscles, of course) --and that the mounting point of the binding should be adjusted based on where the skier's own center of mass is, not the hyper fit athlete who tested the prototype. Personally I always have mounted on the line. My last pair of skis--Atomic Automatics--are interesting. A lot of forum posts talk about mounting them forward. In fact the mounting point identified in the Atomic shop manual is a cm or two (I forget which) forward of the mounting line on the ski, measured from the tails. 

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