or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Newbie edging using kit

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

So I got my edging kit.  Has side angle tool, gummi stone, 3 diamonds and a metal file.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00G3YV2HM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I want to work on my Rossi Phantoms to get ready for my ski trip later this week.  I'll be skiing moguls(likely hard packed and deep) in SLC and am hoping to get the skis right.

 

I'm a bit confused, even though I've been skiing >40 yrs I've never worked on my ski edges. Do i need to worry at all about using that metal file?  Or is that if I just want to change the angles, which I assume I shoulder stay away from.  All Rossi skis are listed as 1,1 angles.  

 

Do I use the gummi stone first, then it appears I read I should use it last also.

Do i just carefully run the angel tool a few times on the edges going from black>blue>red. 

 

Also, detuning, which i assume is last step, I round out the edge both on tips and tails so many cm's from end to help prevent catching an edge?

 

I'm sure after I use the equipment a little it won't seem like such a mystery, but a little initial guidance is appreciated. 

 

I'm an aggressive skier, looking for bumps all day.  I read that a deeper angle might be better for me?? Should I even worry about trying to put a 2 or 3 angle on the edge? (probably not).

 

Anyway, today is a good day for all of this, because it's brutal outside here in Pa!

post #2 of 10
Have you watched any YouTube videos on tuning your skis? Couple people on the board have really nice videos on how to. I list some below.

If I am just polishing the edges, removing small burs I use a diamond stone. If I need to correct an edge I use a file. I use a couple files actually.

Use the file tool and you should hear and feel the areas that are in bad shape. I gummy before I wax just to make sure I didn't kick anything up.

You should search the forum on edge angles. There was a good dscusion recently on this. My skis are 1/3 but I ski hard conditions all the time.

Watch the videos, read the board and try different things. You will eventually find the way you like your skis. I linked to two YouTube play lists. There are a lot more out there. Lots of ways to skin a cat.

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCE6EC3798FC72CF1

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzAX1hV85KGqPey0XXcsKm8_0ffvY3zod
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

The project is in process.  I was able to rig up a workable bench using a 6x6 post and cutting a slit in it to do the side edges.

I can see my edges need some work. 

post #4 of 10
How bad are the edges? Remember that completely filing or stoning every scratch and ding all the way down means running out of edge pretty quickly. I've got plenty of scratches and a few dings in my side edges that I can easily feel with a fingernail but that have zero effect on performance, and maybe a little more untouched damage on the base edge because I'm want to avoid overbeveling and effectively making the bases convex or base-high (when upside down). A little bit base high isn't a big deal for the vast majority of us, but even just overusing a diamond stone repeatedly will change the base enough to slow your edge engagement noticeably. So even though YouTube videos show you how to work base bevels, understand that you're only going to do that when absolutely necessary.

I'm a big fan of the Start Haus videos. Some of them go fast, but the information is solid and well presented. Jacques' videos are much more detailed and go at a slower pace.

How about wax? Have you invested in an iron, scrapers and brushes? I've read that edges are way more important than wax in hard conditions back east, but given how much fresh snow you guys have had lately, a nice hot wax will make a big difference in how the skis feel and how fast they are.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice Litterbug.

I live in the East, but I basically only ski out West.  On my way to SLC tomorrow!  But the way things have been out there I know I am going to need a good edge. 

 

I've waxed xc skis for over 25 years, but this was the first time I had at my downhill skis.  My logic was I go fast enough, and that's not necessary a dumb way to look at it. But last year I noticed my waxed pal was faster on the flats and so this year I was all over it.  When I skied in CO last month I noticed an appreciable difference in speed on the flats.  Less poling and skating is quite all right! I just got done waxing them up again for my trip and I think I have the basics of that down.  I rigged up a simple waxing bench with some cut up wood blocks and it worked just fine.  I cut a slit in the blocks for my edge work.

 

I'm not so sure of myself with the edge work.  I watched a bunch of videos, but some of they are way too long and involved for what I want to get into or think is necessary.  I have an edger, but one problem with doing the base is that the side is not exactly flat, so it was hard to know if I was on the right 1 degree.  I did my best.  When doing the side edge it was easier because of the flat wide base.

 

I used the steel file first(came with kit), because there seemed to be a lot of side scratches.  I probably? didn't go too deep.  Then I took some strokes with the middle diamond file  That didn't seem to do too much, but I didn't over do it. 

 

I am not sure about the gummy stones and some of the other stuff i saw online, because that seems more like "making love" to the ski rather than making them work better.  And since I'm leaving town tomorrow.....

 

Anyway, on Thursday there will be some hard, deep moguls to let me know what kind of ski tuner I am. 

post #6 of 10
My Kenjas are in the vise right now for sharpening and waxing because when I checked on Saturday I saw that the edges aren't sharp anymore. mad.gif A lot of skiing this season has been on shallow fresh snow and spring conditions, but I guess I've been on just enough icy hardpack (Utah style, of course) to dull the edges.

Diamond stones are designed to polish out the marks left by filing, and even the coarse ones don't remove much material. Do you use a lubricant for the diamond stone? And are you keeping it clean of filings? I spray the stone and the edge with a 50/50 alcohol/water mixture before starting, and regularly wipe the edge with a damp cloth to remove sludge. I frequently adjust the stone's position on the tool to expose a clean area, and regularly spray it well and wipe it clean with a cloth.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

So I got my edging kit.  Has side angle tool, gummi stone, 3 diamonds and a metal file.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00G3YV2HM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I want to work on my Rossi Phantoms to get ready for my ski trip later this week.  I'll be skiing moguls(likely hard packed and deep) in SLC and am hoping to get the skis right.

 

I'm a bit confused, even though I've been skiing >40 yrs I've never worked on my ski edges. Do i need to worry at all about using that metal file?  Or is that if I just want to change the angles, which I assume I shoulder stay away from.  All Rossi skis are listed as 1,1 angles.  

 

Do I use the gummi stone first, then it appears I read I should use it last also.

Do i just carefully run the angel tool a few times on the edges going from black>blue>red. 

 

Also, detuning, which i assume is last step, I round out the edge both on tips and tails so many cm's from end to help prevent catching an edge?

 

I'm sure after I use the equipment a little it won't seem like such a mystery, but a little initial guidance is appreciated. 

 

I'm an aggressive skier, looking for bumps all day.  I read that a deeper angle might be better for me?? Should I even worry about trying to put a 2 or 3 angle on the edge? (probably not).

 

Anyway, today is a good day for all of this, because it's brutal outside here in Pa!


This is a good place to start.

 

post #8 of 10


Use the file to set your bevels & the stones to hone them and maintain them.  The gummi is multi purpose, takes off rust, detunes, etc.  But for the sake of edge tuning use it in the final step after sharpening from the side, run the gummi down the edge at a 45 deg angle with ZERO pressure to remove the hanging burr, then you're done.

 

There is a vid on this page for your tool specifically:

http://racewax.com/p-515-complete-edge-care-kit-base-side-ski-angle-tool-3-diamonds-gummi-stone.aspx

 

Here is detailed info on edge tuning and there is a pic of a guy holding a red gummi - use yours in the same way.

http://racewax.com/t-edge-tuning.aspx

Remember - super-light & no pressure.

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Like every new skill you have to first dive into it, hopefully w/o making the situation any worse.

Next year I'll work on fine tuning the procedure.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Like every new skill you have to first dive into it, hopefully w/o making the situation any worse.

Next year I'll work on fine tuning the procedure.


You have a great outlook there.  Don't sweat the super perfection.  Just do your best.  You will not make anything any "worse"!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs