or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skiing in South Korea -- Not for the Faint of Heart
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Skiing in South Korea -- Not for the Faint of Heart

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

This is the typical scene you'll find while skiing on the weekend in South Korea.  It's a little better during the week, but not by much.

 

 

post #2 of 27

That doesn't look like too much fun, unless dodging dozens of people is your idea of fun. Is there any off-piste access?

post #3 of 27

What are the crowds like on steeper terrain? Maybe that is where all the Patrolers with toboggans are coming from.

 

With FIS certified courses there has got to be some interesting stuff there.

post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

No off--piste at the resorts I've been to.  If you're in Northeast Asia, spend your time in Japan -- it's really great, although not every resort allows off-piste skiing.

post #5 of 27
Yeah, skiing in Japan sounds really great for anyone who couldn't care less about the unknown nuclear radiation aftermath. Not me.
post #6 of 27

didn't look like enough snow to get off that cat track. Was it man made and possibly just at low elevation? Never skied Korea but I expect we will be hearing a lot more about it soon..

post #7 of 27
I have seen it that crowded on a number of ski areas here in the states.
post #8 of 27
They've got NOTHING on Camelback.

Also, I feel like there was a video of an Austrian piste posted here that was really hair raising.
post #9 of 27
I've seen slopes in Japan that crowded back in the middle of their 'ski boom' days in the early 90's.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

Yeah, skiing in Japan sounds really great for anyone who couldn't care less about the unknown nuclear radiation aftermath. Not me.

While Japan is small, it is very long. I'd go back to ski on my 'hometown', the Hakuba area, or Hokkaido in a heartbeat.
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 

I skied Furano (on Hokkaido) in December/January.  It was great, as usual, and wasn't that crowded even over the New Year's holiday. 

 

Regarding a post farther up, you could say that skiing in South Korea is currently fashionable, so there are tons of people trying it out (particularly snowboarding).  It's probably similar to what was found in Japan in the 80s and 90s.  A big difference, though, is that you don't get nearly the same amounts of snow in South Korea as in Japan.  Hokkaido snow is unbelievably good. 

post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

They've got NOTHING on Camelback.

Also, I feel like there was a video of an Austrian piste posted here that was really hair raising.

 

Happy Valley in St. Anton

 

post #13 of 27
That's the one! Thanks! Although... Remembering some crashes..
Edited by sibhusky - 2/16/15 at 6:44am
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

They've got NOTHING on Camelback.

 

Or Blue Mountain during XMas week.

 

Take ten times as many people and put them on a trial one tenth as wide.  Make every fourth one lay down and sprawl all over the hill.  Add a 90 degree turn every 100 feet.  Congratulations! now you've got the Burma Road.

post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Remembering some crashes..

 

You might be remembering the photo I posted from the road to Stuben. I inadvertently caught a yard sale in progress.

 

 

post #16 of 27

Funny it's named Happy Valley as that's the same name for the one at Blue Mountain in Ontario that's just as bad.

post #17 of 27

Exactly!  I inadvertently got caught on Happy Valley at Blue while heading across the hill on our way to the north area for some double blacks, and I thought I walked into a shopping mall full of people on skis.  It was INSANE.  Far worse than the OP's original video.  Soooooooooooo busy. Never saw anything like that in my life, and I've seen some crowded slopes around here.

 

Looking forward to next week's trip to Colorado.  Our Western friends' idea of "busy" is my idea of "utterly empty" by comparison LOL.

post #18 of 27
That's nothing, here's my local mole hill on a busy day
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

That's nothing, here's my local mole hill on a busy day

That is really frightening.

post #20 of 27

Yep, that looks like some trails at Blue on a weekend.  We head to the North and Orchard areas to avoid that.  Although, Glen Eden is like that on the weekends, and it's too small to escape anywhere.

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

Yep, that looks like some trails at Blue on a weekend.  We head to the North and Orchard areas to avoid that.  Although, Glen Eden is like that on the weekends, and it's too small to escape anywhere.


Hockley Valley is just as bad after about Noon, when the nuts arrive.

post #22 of 27

Yes, that last video is what I know around here, as well. 90 mins outside DC, on a busy day.

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 


Hockley Valley is just as bad after about Noon, when the nuts arrive.


I hear ya, been there done that.  Last time I was at Hockley I decided to take a stab at coming down through the old T-bar lift that's empty through the trees in front of the lodge.  Hey, it was all untouched soft snow there and no people!  Problem was I had slalom skis on at the time and running T-bars for gates on soft snow.....probably not the best idea. Almost bought it LMAO.  Buy nobody pulled my pass though, they probably didn't even notice.

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

They've got NOTHING on Camelback.

 

Or Blue Mountain during XMas week.

 

Take ten times as many people and put them on a trial one tenth as wide.  Make every fourth one lay down and sprawl all over the hill.  Add a 90 degree turn every 100 feet.  Congratulations! now you've got the Burma Road.

Good one Walt - EXACTLY!  But you forgot to mention the classic Blue Mtn glass bead media surface, just like this: http://www.harborfreight.com/50-lbs-80-grit-glass-bead-media-61874.html  that requires you to perform hop turns at slow speed just to navigate the sprawled folk in the quick sand ........ and on any given weekend regardless of holiday.   I've vowed never to ski Burma again when starting at the summit lodge, just take the short cuts over to Main St.and head down to the 6 pack.

post #25 of 27

Necropost

I go skiing all the time in Korea. I've noticed that weekends are generally absolutely terrible, while weekdays are fine. Even on weekends, I have been able to continuously do the advanced slopes, while only having a line of around 5 people for the lift (while the lifts servicing the beginner slopes have 20 minute waits)

The snow quality is generally... not very good, however the temperature consistently stays really low, so it's fine to make snow. There is quite little natural snow (Yongpyeong gets about 2.5 meters a winter. at best).

There are some people (very few... whom I have only seen in videos on youtube) who go backcountry skiing on the islands of Ulleung-do and Jeju-do, which do actually get a bunch of snow, but not nearly as much as Japan.

Skiing in Korea is really accessible, by public transport, and the facilities are generally really nice, but it isn't anything really special in my opinion. Feels relatively similar to the east coast skiing I was used to back home. 

 

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jovegajo View Post
 

Necropost

I go skiing all the time in Korea. I've noticed that weekends are generally absolutely terrible, while weekdays are fine. Even on weekends, I have been able to continuously do the advanced slopes, while only having a line of around 5 people for the lift (while the lifts servicing the beginner slopes have 20 minute waits)

The snow quality is generally... not very good, however the temperature consistently stays really low, so it's fine to make snow. There is quite little natural snow (Yongpyeong gets about 2.5 meters a winter. at best).

There are some people (very few... whom I have only seen in videos on youtube) who go backcountry skiing on the islands of Ulleung-do and Jeju-do, which do actually get a bunch of snow, but not nearly as much as Japan.

Skiing in Korea is really accessible, by public transport, and the facilities are generally really nice, but it isn't anything really special in my opinion. Feels relatively similar to the east coast skiing I was used to back home.

 

 

Where can I reach you? Would like to ski with you at some point (am based in Seoul although I grew up skiing in Canada and the US East Coast). I almost always ski alone these days (didn't like the "demos" and "interski" fanatics preaching their SIA level testing principles to me when I was just trying to have a good time)

post #27 of 27

It was easily that busy in Austria last winter, but the top of most resorts being on a glacier puts it out of range of the ability of the masses, seems most people are happy on blue runs in big groups. Blacks are safer than blues, mostly as the risk of collision is far less.

 

Chongli, Zhangjiakou in Hebei in China looks much similar to Korea, other than a few less people on the blues, black runs are practically deserted here.    

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skiing in South Korea -- Not for the Faint of Heart