or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Market opportunity for skiing ability level certification?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Market opportunity for skiing ability level certification? - Page 3

post #61 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by drstuess View Post

 


Winner Run of Smoothy Sam (NZL) - Swatch... by FreerideWorldTourTV

 

embed works until I hit submit, then it doesn't show up.  But watch the video, some amazing skiing.

Oh, I'm sure someone will find fault.

post #62 of 73

Eye opening thread.

 

When I saw the first post, I thought "interesting idea". But having read through the rest of the thread, I can see why it's a terrible idea if one's interested in making money off of it.

 

I think most people knows in the heart of their heart, their own skiing isn't up to their own standard. But that's depressing to admit so they don't. The last thing they need is an objective measure to confirm their own suspicion.

 

Those who are as good as they want, typically get there by work on it diligently. But after paying for lessons and tickets etc., I'm not sure they feel too strongly about paying some more money just to get some pins!

 

I think there's a place for such "stars" at the beginner/low intermediate level. When the progression itself is half of the fun. But anyone who actually work on their skiing will soon get past that stage. So it's not a repeating business.   

post #63 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

I would not be interested in paying for certification that gains me nothing other than bragging rights.

 

Well, perhaps you wouldn't.    Yet there is still a market for liberal arts and philosophy degrees.   :duck:

post #64 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

It already exists. Epic Mix Academy. All ski school participants at Vail-owned ski areas get a report card with the level of their next lesson.

Of course, having created the report card, management is trying to get instructors to apply common standards. Of course, there. Are some incentive problems there, especially around tip time.

Mike

 

I love the pins from Epic Mix Academy. I realize this is totally juvenile, but having instructor-assigned pins lifts my spirits. I especially like Royal Flush and Jonah and the Whale. Cute names.

post #65 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

I would not be interested in paying for certification that gains me nothing other than bragging rights.

 

Well, perhaps you wouldn't.    Yet there is still a market for liberal arts and philosophy degrees.   :duck:

 

Exactly. The *process* of getting liberal arts and philosophy degrees conveys a great deal of knowledge and the toolkit for wisdom (I don't think I can in good conscience call 22 year old grads "wise"). The degree is just proof that you went through the process.  The idea of certifications for recreational skiers is depressingly external-reward-oriented, when IMO the value of any of these things is in the process.

 

That being said, I guess I shouldn't vilify those who might be driven by external rewards. Maybe such a cert system would get some otherwise dangerously out of control skiers to learn proper technique even though they're not intrinsically motivated, because of the external reward. Gamification, like what EpicMix does, could help with this, but I still don't see it being a strong motivating factor for more than a handful of adults. It might be fun for a lot of younger kids, though.

post #66 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Well, perhaps you wouldn't.    Yet there is still a market for liberal arts and philosophy degrees.   duck.gif

LOL true. I hear the philosophy companies are doing a lot of hiring lately…
post #67 of 73

My nephew is a post-doc in comparative literature--specializing in comic books. But he can say "Would you like to Super Size that?" in French, Italian, and English.

post #68 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

It already exists. Epic Mix Academy. All ski school participants at Vail-owned ski areas get a report card with the level of their next lesson.

Of course, having created the report card, management is trying to get instructors to apply common standards. Of course, there. Are some incentive problems there, especially around tip time.

Mike
The problem is one can never move them down without trauma. So when you get the power wedger in a black class and tell the parent they really should be in -gasp- green, it doesn't go over too well.
Then they show up to black again.
post #69 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post

And now a useful certification.

Give first day never evers a red lift ticket so the lifties can ID them and keep them off the blue and black lifts.
Ski patrol needs work...
post #70 of 73
Not every place has blue and black lifts. But if you buy the Learn to Ski package, you're restricted to the lower lifts here. Apparently that is 6, 9 and 10. There are blue runs available. In fact, you could ski the Chair 10 lift line, some serious stuff, if short.
post #71 of 73
Yesterday here they were slowing the black lift to a crawl and stopping it, and then helping beginners get on it, so they could get to the top of the mountain. It was like Armageddon. We finally just went home it became so dangerous.
post #72 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
 

Eye opening thread.

 

When I saw the first post, I thought "interesting idea". But having read through the rest of the thread, I can see why it's a terrible idea if one's interested in making money off of it.

 

I think most people knows in the heart of their heart, their own skiing isn't up to their own standard. But that's depressing to admit so they don't. The last thing they need is an objective measure to confirm their own suspicion.

 

Those who are as good as they want, typically get there by work on it diligently. But after paying for lessons and tickets etc., I'm not sure they feel too strongly about paying some more money just to get some pins!

 

I think there's a place for such "stars" at the beginner/low intermediate level. When the progression itself is half of the fun. But anyone who actually work on their skiing will soon get past that stage. So it's not a repeating business.   

 

That's essentially the PSIA levels through level 6 or 7 or so.  You move up through the levels pretty rapidly at first, and then there are huge jumps between the last couple levels.

 

I remember at one point thinking I'd be ecstatic if an instructor ever told me I had reached "Level 9"...  and then I got "Level 9"  written on my card for the first time, and all I knew was that I still had a boatload of things to work on. 

 

At some point, you run out of meaningful levels because everybody has their own strengths and weaknesses...  i.e., I'm better at random skier "X" at task "Y", but they're better than me at "task Z".  Who is better?  Who would score higher on some arbitrary scale?  Most high-level skiers I know are well aware of what their deficiencies are and can work around them...  but would love to not have to work around them when things get "sketchy".  Fewer limitation = more line choice.

post #73 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

At some point, you run out of meaningful levels because everybody has their own strengths and weaknesses...  i.e., I'm better at random skier "X" at task "Y", but they're better than me at "task Z".  Who is better?  Who would score higher on some arbitrary scale?  Most high-level skiers I know are well aware of what their deficiencies are and can work around them...  but would love to not have to work around them when things get "sketchy".  Fewer limitation = more line choice.

 

That's more true amongst randomly selected skiers than it is amongst a group that stays together and skis together consistently over days, weeks, or several seasons.

Notice that every counterargument above has at its basis a single fundamental assumption:   the skier being marketed to generally skis and talks with relative strangers.     Sure, this is how most USAian skiing happens - but that is not the only possible model.

I think that the 'marketing opportunity' talked of by the OP is more suitable for  relatively cohesive groups that regularly choose ski partners from within the group.   Which is why I brought up the Ski Club of GB above.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Market opportunity for skiing ability level certification?