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Ski Wobble - Bad Skiing - Page 2

post #31 of 48

What we all think we look like:

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post
 
 



 

 

What we all actually look like:

 

OK maybe I'm exxaggerating a little, and apologies to Colorado and thanks for the use of the pic you so bravely posted.

post #32 of 48

Your funny Old Goat, are you skiing at Mt. Bachelor? We are going to be there this year sometime, I got the 3 days for $109 deal.

 

When I first started racing and saw the videos I realized that I was skiing the course like I was free skiing, as that is what I had done for my whole life up until then. With couching from some pro race couches and good racers I was lucky to ski with I learned to do race turns and my position and time improved quite a bit.

Each ski discipline has it's own methods and the difference between race skis and powder skis are quite a bit; in the old days before shaped and fat skis we mostly skied on GS skis out West and I skied on SL back East.

One has to take into account that the way you ski racing, in moguls, recreational, and powder are a bit different, but they all use the same basic dynamics.


Edited by tomfifield - 2/19/15 at 1:30pm
post #33 of 48

How about if we call it inside knee? I do agree skis do move back and forth, and the tipping part is right on, there is obviously a transition and it is not static. I think this is more a issue of language.

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Hip rotation/pendulum? One knee behind the other? Sounds like we' re coaching hip dumping with an A frame... Can you clarify?

 



A-frame was that a 70’s thing, where you put your knee on the un-weighted knee and made an A? That would leave one ski flat and not on edge if I remember right, not what we do today. I did not write my post very well sorry. Lets say you use your feet, ankles and knees with your hip floating above them, still not the best but better.
When I was a kid people would say “if there is no light between your legs your good”, so much has changed.
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by bnapilot View Post
 

Hello all! I've been reading this forum for a while and now finally am making a first post. 

 

How does this work? Lets see... My name is Matt. I'm 6'4" 210# and I'm a bad skier. I used to be a good skier as a kid when I grew up on the east coast skiing every week I could till i was about 12. Haven't jumped back on skis for 18 years until 2012. I seemed to get out there on a guys ski trip in 2012 and feel pretty confident about my abilities as I was skiing on-piste with decent speed and felt in control. A little more cautions on groomed blacks but still pretty confident. Well...with one exception. I knew whatever I was doing (which I'm sure was not skiing) looked horrible. I felt there was a problem in my boots but since it's been so long and equipment has changed so much I didn't really know what to look for. But I did know this... I was dealing with a problem of wobbling tips / skis.

 

I'll post a link to a youtube video of what I'm talking about below, it's not great quality as it was just a chesty gopro that happened to be pointing down a bit, but hopefully you'll get the hint. It's varied terrain in Blue Sky Basin @ Vail.

 

 

I'm trying to nail down if this is a problem of:

 

A) Me in the back seat

B) Boot fit

C) Skis too aggressive - Volkl Mantra 191s

D) Lack of leg strength

 

I know you can't see a lot from the video, however I figured I'd ask for a few ideas on what could cause this erratic ski behavior as I'll be back again next week. I've planned a private lesson for day 2 but thought I'd have something to warm up with.

 

Blue Skies & Fresh Pow!


I just posted the same question earlier today on this site and was laughed off the forum.  They even thought I was joking-I think its a combination of back seat driving and/or failing to maintain at least a slight edge even when it appears that we are mostly going straight.  Also there is some issue where a stone grinding is needed?

post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

For starters--you're looking at your skis instead of where you're going.:)


Excellent...one of my worst problems sometimes

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bnapilot View Post
 

Hello all! I've been reading this forum for a while and now finally am making a first post. 

 

How does this work? Lets see... My name is Matt. I'm 6'4" 210# and I'm a bad skier. I used to be a good skier as a kid when I grew up on the east coast skiing every week I could till i was about 12. Haven't jumped back on skis for 18 years until 2012. I seemed to get out there on a guys ski trip in 2012 and feel pretty confident about my abilities as I was skiing on-piste with decent speed and felt in control. A little more cautions on groomed blacks but still pretty confident. Well...with one exception. I knew whatever I was doing (which I'm sure was not skiing) looked horrible. I felt there was a problem in my boots but since it's been so long and equipment has changed so much I didn't really know what to look for. But I did know this... I was dealing with a problem of wobbling tips / skis.

 

I'll post a link to a youtube video of what I'm talking about below, it's not great quality as it was just a chesty gopro that happened to be pointing down a bit, but hopefully you'll get the hint. It's varied terrain in Blue Sky Basin @ Vail.

 

 

I'm trying to nail down if this is a problem of:

 

A) Me in the back seat

B) Boot fit

C) Skis too aggressive - Volkl Mantra 191s

D) Lack of leg strength

 

I know you can't see a lot from the video, however I figured I'd ask for a few ideas on what could cause this erratic ski behavior as I'll be back again next week. I've planned a private lesson for day 2 but thought I'd have something to warm up with.

 

Blue Skies & Fresh Pow!


I just posted the same question earlier today on this site and was laughed off the forum.  They even thought I was joking-I think its a combination of back seat driving and/or failing to maintain at least a slight edge even when it appears that we are mostly going straight.  Also there is some issue where a stone grinding is needed?

 

Sorry about that.  Keep trying.  

post #38 of 48

$600 worth of lessons would help, or you could read about ski stance, watch some videos, and experiment on the slopes (which is why you are asking here).  The snowboarder I used to ski with was so nasty that just the sound of his turns on hardpack would force me to engage the edges.

 

I think my stance gets thrown off going between powder and ice.   If I find myself in the back seat I can fix it on my own by attacking the turns and exaggerating the weight transfer to my boot cuffs, to the point where the ski tails skid occasionally.  Then I can relax a bit.

 

You could try skiing slowly almost perpendicular to the fall line (across the mountain), applying pressure to your downhill ski, and lifting your uphill ski of the snow as you begin to turn. Continue turning like this until you get tired.   It's ok to put both skis on the snow after the turn. You will quickly learn that if there's not enough pressure on the front of your ski, the turn will not happen and you'll probably tip over.  Also if this tires your legs or back quickly you probably could use some conditioning. 

 

Sad to say, there was such limited terrain open last year I became proficient at one foot skiing on greens and blues.  On steeper or ungrommed trails, my fear of committing put me in the back seat on one legged turns, and I would fall unless I really focused and attacked.

post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter5 View Post
 

$600 worth of lessons would help, or you could read about ski stance, watch some videos, and experiment on the slopes (which is why you are asking here).  The snowboarder I used to ski with was so nasty that just the sound of his turns on hardpack would force me to engage the edges.

 

I think my stance gets thrown off going between powder and ice.   If I find myself in the back seat I can fix it on my own by attacking the turns and exaggerating the weight transfer to my boot cuffs, to the point where the ski tails skid occasionally.  Then I can relax a bit.

 

You could try skiing slowly almost perpendicular to the fall line (across the mountain), applying pressure to your downhill ski, and lifting your uphill ski of the snow as you begin to turn. Continue turning like this until you get tired.   It's ok to put both skis on the snow after the turn. You will quickly learn that if there's not enough pressure on the front of your ski, the turn will not happen and you'll probably tip over.  Also if this tires your legs or back quickly you probably could use some conditioning. 

 

Sad to say, there was such limited terrain open last year I became proficient at one foot skiing on greens and blues.  On steeper or ungrommed trails, my fear of committing put me in the back seat on one legged turns, and I would fall unless I really focused and attacked.

Thank you for your reply.  I have lessons up coming.  I'm going to get this problem fixed this season.  I found some other discussions about this problem.

Think snow !

post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post


I just posted the same question earlier today on this site and was laughed off the forum.  They even thought I was joking-I think its a combination of back seat driving and/or failing to maintain at least a slight edge even when it appears that we are mostly going straight.  Also there is some issue where a stone grinding is needed?

An expert forum like this often has problems with people posing as beginners and asking questions with the intent of making fun of the people who reply. It's easy to be suspicious of a new member and not be sure of their true intentions. Certain subjects or seem to cause red flags to go up and the OP get accused of Trolling. The worst part is being suckered in by a thread, trying to be helpful, and then find out you were being made fun of.

This is a great forum with solid advice, so do persevere. Be up front with as much information as you can, so people can see you are for real, and try to isolate your question to a single issue. You can also post in the Beginner Zone, which is better moderated and beginner questions are viewed more seriously. GL.
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post


An expert forum like this often has problems with people posing as beginners and asking questions with the intent of making fun of the people who reply. It's easy to be suspicious of a new member and not be sure of their true intentions. Certain subjects or seem to cause red flags to go up and the OP get accused of Trolling. The worst part is being suckered in by a thread, trying to be helpful, and then find out you were being made fun of.

This is a great forum with solid advice, so do persevere. Be up front with as much information as you can, so people can see you are for real, and try to isolate your question to a single issue. You can also post in the Beginner Zone, which is better moderated and beginner questions are viewed more seriously. GL.

Thats an interesting point.  One can see from my other questions asked that I'm serious and just a little confused.  Sorry guys but it never occurred to me that people would post a stupid question to drag other people into a joke.

post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post


An expert forum like this often has problems with people posing as beginners and asking questions with the intent of making fun of the people who reply. It's easy to be suspicious of a new member and not be sure of their true intentions. Certain subjects or seem to cause red flags to go up and the OP get accused of Trolling. The worst part is being suckered in by a thread, trying to be helpful, and then find out you were being made fun of.

This is a great forum with solid advice, so do persevere. Be up front with as much information as you can, so people can see you are for real, and try to isolate your question to a single issue. You can also post in the Beginner Zone, which is better moderated and beginner questions are viewed more seriously. GL.


Oh no I just saw a detail in that message.  I had no idea this is an expert forum.  Sometimes I need advice from experts, though.  Otherwise I will reserve my more idiotic questions for a intermediate forum.  I did manage to fins a ton of advice about the wobbling ski question.  I just want Googling with the right term which is wobbling.  Thanks and No I didn't take offense to the trolling.

post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 
An expert forum like this ...

 

I can see that I don't belong here! :( 

 

I'll just have to take my keyboard over to the dweeb forum!

 

For the wobbly skis, might I suggest that rather than "attack," simply flexing the ankles so the shins are always touching the front of the boots might stabilize the skis. Attack seems to suggest a confrontational mindset that isn't really required (usually - there are exceptions) and doesn't really prescribe a particular set of movements to solve the problem.

 

Getting forward by bending at the waist ain't gonna do it. Flex the ankles, grasshopper.

 

But that's just me. And as we know, I belong in the dweeb forum!

post #44 of 48

Short turn radius skis will wobble when skiing straight down the fall line.  Longer radius skis not so much.  The effect can be made better or worse by weighting the skis more towards the tips or tails, but really the solution is to keep them on edge, even only slightly on edge.  Or get a longer turn radius ski. 

post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
 

 

I can see that I don't belong here! :( 

 

I'll just have to take my keyboard over to the dweeb forum!

 

For the wobbly skis, might I suggest that rather than "attack," simply flexing the ankles so the shins are always touching the front of the boots might stabilize the skis. Attack seems to suggest a confrontational mindset that isn't really required (usually - there are exceptions) and doesn't really prescribe a particular set of movements to solve the problem.

 

Getting forward by bending at the waist ain't gonna do it. Flex the ankles, grasshopper.

 

But that's just me. And as we know, I belong in the dweeb forum!


I am grateful for all advice-I am 47 and need to get all my skiing problems fixed so I can enjoy the years on the Mountain I have left.  Bad posture and skills make skiing upsetting, dangerous, and exhausting.I am going to look at the Youtube videos a previous Poster suggested.

You guys also need to see the Doug Coombs photo where he's skiing down the frozen waterfall.

post #46 of 48
Maybe instead of expert, I should have said specialized? In the sence that we discuss a specific subject here and people can get advice from experts. I'm not one😀
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Short turn radius skis will wobble when skiing straight down the fall line.  Longer radius skis not so much.  The effect can be made better or worse by weighting the skis more towards the tips or tails, but really the solution is to keep them on edge, even only slightly on edge.  Or get a longer turn radius ski. 


Thats what I keep hearing and I'm absolutely taking that to heart-there was this girl at Snowshoe who was going straight and she wrecked right in front of us and smashed her face in the snow.  I don't even know how anything was left of her face but luckily it was okay.  Apparently her spleen was not.  She was screaming.  I was skiing with someone who works ski Patrol so we stayed with her and got the on duty ski patrol.  They carried her off in the stretcher.  I think she fell victim to a wandering ski which is my fear that the wobbling skis turn into a ski wandering off and producing a crash.  

post #48 of 48

I just rewatched you video.  Boot fitting too loosely could be a problem too.  The mantra's turn radius is pretty large, so not likely to find a solution going larger, but your skis ARE being knowcked around at the whim of the terrain.  Tip those puppies!    Find another instructor, to help you do it. 

 

Considering you past experience, it might also help you engage your edges when tipped to the edges you want (right or left), to get a ski without tip rocker so you only have to adapt to more shapely skis from more straight skis, and not have to adapt to rocker the profile.

 

Job one is boots that fit snuggly.  Job two is learn to put the skis on edge.  When the skis are on edge they will stabilize themselves.

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