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MA request

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I took a lesson at Squaw a few weeks back and have been practising the drills the instructor taught me. Basically, stuff I need to work on - ub/lb separation, pole plant - then up, flex extend and also ski less "statically". Also have been working on edge release and tipping to initiate new turns.

Have been workin on these things, but wanted to put up an MA request anyways.

Looks like I have a long way to go before I attempt bumps (coz I ski them defensively).

The following video was taken at Shirley (prolly run 3). Nice snow (dry powdery but not deep at all).
post #2 of 28

Good skiing. A lot of flex in the joints(good) and probably to little extension. Sometime the extension is to much up instead of along your trajectory. Biggest thing I would like to see from a skier like you is pressuring the new outside ski earlier and see how that feels. 

post #3 of 28

Good skiing. Nice round turns and good rhythm. What stands out to me is that you are down stemming your old outside ski at the end of the turn. This is by far the most common flaw in the intermediate segment. Even in the advanced segment it can be a problem.

 

My fix is very straight forward. Get away from stemming by up-unweighting and using your feet more simultaniously. For a video PM me. You are also probably going to recieve some alignment and boot canting suggestions and its well worth going through the prosess with a professional but you also need to do some work on your technique.

 

T

post #4 of 28

I agree with tdk, the biggest issue you have present in your skiing right now is that stem at the end of each turn. However, I can't be sure if it is a down stem with the old outside, or an up stem with the new outside ski.

 

If it is a down stem, you are pushing your outside tail a little too much, and not actively steering the inside ski sufficiently. I'd remedy that by thinking about guiding your inside knee into the turn as you go through the fall line to the end of the turn. 

 

For an up stem, the resolution has to come from getting used to a simultaneous edge change, rather than using the uphill ski as leverage to start the new turn, which results in a sequential edge change. For that, I'd focus on feeling the pressure in the cuff of your boot through the turn. Think about the two spots on your boot cuff where the tongue of the boot meets the main cuff. as you finish an old turn and prepare to change edges, you want to be pressuring your cuff on the uphill tongue/cuff seam of both boots. To transition, roll that pressure across the tongue of the boot to the downhill tongue/cuff seam. If you're rolling the pressure across both boot tongues at the same time, the stem will be gone. 

 

Another way to deal with both stems is to think about retracting into the new turn instead of extending into it. To initiate the new turn, relax your downhill leg and start retracting it. Your inertia is going to bring your center of mass naturally across your skis and initiate the new turn. By doing this, you're eliminating the possibility of pushing off with that uphill ski, and at the same time, reducing the chance that you're going to overpressure the downhill ski at the end of the turn. 

 

I don't think this is an alignment issue, because it doesn't look like an A-frame, it looks like stemming. 

post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks tdk6 and freeski919 for the review. Basically, my modus operandi has been to move my body over the skis to initiate the turn by flattening them/releasing the edges, and then tipping the (new) inside ski into the turn.

I have been practising that this season, obviously the stem is not gone yet. After watching my video, I think perhaps I'm doing both - release and early weight transfer to the (new) outside ski - causing the stem. I will try both of your suggestions ... Guess I need to keep working on this.

As an aside, at the end of the day (when I'm tired) or on steeper runs, I tend to do the "stemming move" more than the edge-release-and-tip move.
post #6 of 28

Nomad... You are a good skier. I think you could be a great skier. There are just a couple fundamental things that need tackling.

 

First, you have dead spots in every one of your turns.  You make a turn, followed by a short traverse. Rinse and repeat. This negates all of the power and energy that the ski provides. So here's what you need to think about:

 

1) Your should be actively turning ALL THE TIME.  As soon as you stop actively turning in one direction you need to be turning in the other. 

 

As others have pointed out you are stemming a bit in a sequential move. There are a number of issues related to that.  Because you are releasing your old turn by stepping to the new outside ski (improperly), you are moving your center of mass up the hill to pressure that outside disrupting the travel of your center of mass from taking its optimal track. Additionally you are dragging your inside ski along for the ride rather than using it actively to lead and guide. [Note: Activity and pressure are independent of each other] 

 

2) Some skiers think in terms of RELEASE>TRANSFER>EDGE (RTE).   I personally embrace RELEASE>EDGE>TRANSFER (RET). But what you seem to be doing is TRANSFER>RELEASE>EDGE (TRE). 

 

So, part of your improvement will come from resequencing your movement patterns. You will have to think your approach to skiing a little differently but it isn't as hard as it may seem.  Everything is interconnected, so once you get going all the pieces will fall together in short order.  

 

I've already spoken about continuous turns. Keep that in the back of your mind. Now, as you finish a turn you already know that most of the pressure is built up on the outside ski (whether you like it or not :D).  You have to release it somehow. What you currently do to release the old turn is step on the new outside ski. Instead of that, why don't you just roll (tip) the foot of your old outside/new inside ski in the direction of the new turn? Though some advocate lifting that ski and tilting it toward the new turn I prefer to keep it in the snow as it prevents your center of mass from shifting too far in the wrong direction while learning. While you're starting to tip that old outside ski to release, you can begin to retract that leg as you simultaneously begin to feel pressure build up on the new outside ski (the one you're currently stepping to).   You should feel the pressure build on the outside ski as your inside continues to retract and progressively edge more and more while the turn develops simultaneously. This is where the turn shape is so important...

 

As you have "come around the corner" from your old turn your momentum and inertia is now modified to go somewhat across the hill. So getting the new turn started immediately with no dead spots is important because as you begin to shape your new turn the change of direction of your skis combined with the new direction caused by intertia creates the force, that when you edge the skis) creates a platform which you can stand  (some use the term balance) against early in the turn. So, your turn shape contributes to pressure control in a major way. 

 

Now back to pressuring... As you can feel the forces build you can retract (and contiuously edge) your new inside ski until you feel most if not all the pressure has transferred to the outside ski.  So retraction of the inside and extension of the outside is how you manage pressure distribution.  It is important to understand that if done properly PRESSURE COMES TO YOU, but in this method it will feel like pressure to the outside ski comes later than you are used to. How much later depends on your speed, the radius of your turns and how your skis load and unload. 

 

And now back to that pesky inside ski... The inside ski leads everything and works hand in hand with the movement and trajectory of your center of mass.  By keeping the inside ski in the snow and using it actively it helps pull the center of mass into position, but the other thing is that actively turning the inside in the direction of the turn creates a force that goes up to you hip, crosses your pelvis and helps to power the outside leg foot and ski.  And even though the outside ski may be the primary pressure bearing ski (at the appropriate time) the inside ski still needs to remain continuously active even if it has little or no pressure on it. 

 

Lastly your center of mass (CoM). Let the active inside ski help pull it into its proper position.  It is probably the hardest thing to train as there are so many variables going on; general direction of travel, momentum, centripetal force and gravity. So for now it is most important to NEVER let your CoM travel back up the hill at all (as you will see yourself doing in the video).  It's all about balancing against the combined forces that are constantly changing and trying to move down the hill. 

 

So to summarize:

1) Turn shape. No dead spots. Let the shape (particularly at the top) help create the platform to balance against early in the turn. If the tips and tails are traveling thru the same path throughout the arc they will load like a spring which when released will create more of the dynamics expert skiers look to achieve. 

 

2) CONTINUOUSLY active inside ski. Whether or not it is pressured it should be tipping and/or turning in the direction of the turn. 

 

3) Strive to keep your CoM moving in the general direction of travel. It will often feel like it's taking a shortcut from the skis' arc. That is where turn shape, beginning to turn in a different direction from momentum and inertia will create the platform for you to get your skis out from under you and have something to balance against.

 

 Sorry to be so long winded. Hope this gives you a starting place to continue your journey.

post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Vindibona1,

Your insightful post helped clarify many things in my mind.

Thanks for the detailed explanation. Much work to do now.
post #8 of 28

@nomad555, here are some stills that show that

package of moves you do in transition.

 

post #9 of 28

...and here's the traverse you allow as you pause between turns.

Sing a song and turn with the rhythm; that should fix the pause/traverse.

Skiing with linked turns without the pause will feel better.

 

Old turn ends here:

 

Right below you should be starting your new turn,

but you're taking a scenic ride towards that stand of trees.

 

Scenic route still in process.


So here you initiate your new turn.  

To delete that traverse, use music in your head to erase this traverse.  Turn with the beat.

OR envision a narrowish lane down the hill and ski inside it rather than changing lanes all the time.

If you were on the crowded slopes of the east you'd get hit from behind.  

But that's not why you should lose the traverse.  Skiing feels so much better when there's

rhythm to the turns.  Plus you'll become skilled agt locking turns together for narrow corridors. 


Edited by LiquidFeet - 2/13/15 at 3:00pm
post #10 of 28

I'll agree with VDB and LF that being able to eliminate a traverse between turns is important. Having the skill of being able to transfer your energy directly from one turn to the next is a tool you absolutely need to have to be a great skier. 

 

However, I'll throw a bit of caution in as well. While most times it is beneficial to go from turn to turn, don't think that it is an absolute necessity at all moments in skiing. Sometimes a traverse is just fine. Maybe because you want to change the part of the trail you're skiing on. Maybe because you want a moment to let your legs rest between turns sometimes. Maybe you just like the feeling of a traverse sometimes. The only reason a traverse is frowned upon is if you are using it because you are unable to go directly from turn to turn. If you are able to do that, but choose to use a traverse... who cares? 

post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hi All (and Vindibona1 specifically).

 

So just checking in to make sure I am doing the right thing. No video but I have been practicing what you guys suggested. One quick question - the active inside knee idea was kind of pretty cool (for me at least). I also read Weems's book ("Brilliant Skiing Everyday"), and in the section on edge change/release he states that one should "charge" with the new inside knee. I also saw this concept discussed in another thread (can't find it now), about how Mikaela Shifrin initiates the turn by pointing the "new" inside knee downhill (above the fall line).

 

So basically, from my perspective, I have been practicing the active inside knee as well as turn initiation by pointing the new inside knee downhill. For me, I find this move is superb. Because - a) I don't have to initiate by engaging my core to flatten my skis (release) - because this move causes me to automatically do this - ie move my CM downhill over the skis and towards the center of the new turn and b) Initiating from the knee seems to have extremely high leverage - instead of initiating from the ankles or feet (think "fulcrum leverage" concept). I only have to remember to pressure both skis (outside more) after this because I am using my knees way way more now than just my feet.

 

So first question is - is this correct ? BTW my knees ache like hell - never felt knees and thighs as tired as the past few days - so if I am not doing the right thing, let me know haha!

post #12 of 28
Great skiing is about efficiency. Your knees and legs are telling you you aren't.

Mike
post #13 of 28

Mike is right, skiing is about efficiency. However, if you're unfamiliar with a more efficient move, it may cause soreness because your muscles aren't used to working in that way. So muscle soreness is not an absolute indicator that you're doing it wrong. 

 

However, if your thighs are sore, there is a chance your active inside knee is pushing you slightly into the back seat. When you move your knee laterally, there is a natural inclination for many people to open their ankle joint slightly. If that's happening, you're having to recover that later in the turn with the large muscles in your quadriceps. 

post #14 of 28
Speaking of efficiency, it is good that you are focusing on your new inside during initiation, but instead of focusing on the knee pointing into the turn, move that focus down to the new inside foot/ankle. This will help your edging via less rotation of the foot/feet in the direction of the new turn. Here is a graphic I am borrowing from another board member to illustrate this:



Image B is what we want, and is what we get if we tip with our feet first. Image C is what happens when we recruit the grosser muscles around the hip joint to roll in the knee...note the direction the foot points in both images. You can try this at home--balance on one foot (support yourself with you hand up against a counter or something) and roll the lifted foot's knee outwardly as if you were moving into a new ski turn. Focus only at the knee and allow the foot to follow. You should note that the foot rotates outwardly as well, which is image C. Now, try the same but focus on tipping at the ankle first...you will find that first of all, inverting the foot (rolling it towards it's little toe) automatically cause the knee to roll out while at the same time the foot stays more or less inline with the direction the femur is pointing ala image B.

By bringing the focus to the foot/ankle first you can achieve better/more efficient edging because the ski(s) will not be inadvertently twisted by the feet and also because the load transfer from the CM to the feet will be much better aligned, allowing for a stronger, skelataly stacked turn...

My 2 cents smile.gif

zenny
post #15 of 28

I'm going to throw out a warning about this as well, particularly in light of the illustration @zentune has put up. The illustration shows the action you want, but keep in mind that the illustration is exaggerated significantly to show what's being talked about. The further the knee joint deviates from being stacked between hip and ankle, the greater the risk of a knee injury becomes. Of course this is most significant when the knee falls inside the hip/ankle line, but the risk still exists when it goes outside the line. Of course, some of this is necessary for skiing, but out of an abundance of caution, I wanted to ensure nobody is trying to make their inside leg actually look like the drawing. 

 

And zen, just want you to know I'm not bashing on the picture, it's spot on for illustration. Just saw it and went "oh, might want to mention this". 

post #16 of 28
No worries, you are right on! Besides, it's TDK6's drawing, not mine wink.gif but there aren't many around so....

zenny
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad555 View Post
 

Hi All (and Vindibona1 specifically).

 

So just checking in to make sure I am doing the right thing. No video but I have been practicing what you guys suggested. One quick question - the active inside knee idea was kind of pretty cool (for me at least). I also read Weems's book ("Brilliant Skiing Everyday"), and in the section on edge change/release he states that one should "charge" with the new inside knee. I also saw this concept discussed in another thread (can't find it now), about how Mikaela Shifrin initiates the turn by pointing the "new" inside knee downhill (above the fall line).

 

So basically, from my perspective, I have been practicing the active inside knee as well as turn initiation by pointing the new inside knee downhill. For me, I find this move is superb. Because - a) I don't have to initiate by engaging my core to flatten my skis (release) - because this move causes me to automatically do this - ie move my CM downhill over the skis and towards the center of the new turn and b) Initiating from the knee seems to have extremely high leverage - instead of initiating from the ankles or feet (think "fulcrum leverage" concept). I only have to remember to pressure both skis (outside more) after this because I am using my knees way way more now than just my feet.

 

So first question is - is this correct ? BTW my knees ache like hell - never felt knees and thighs as tired as the past few days - so if I am not doing the right thing, let me know haha!

I think you're on the right track Nomad. A couple of additional thoughts...

 

>>> BTW my knees ache like hell>>> First, instead of thinking about the knees (your knees cannot bend laterally, which is why they hurt)  think about engaging the inside foot, balancing on the bottom of your foot as you roll your ankle into the front-most side of the ski boot.  then allow the femurs to create the angles from your hip sockets.  Do not allow your knees to twist. The appearance of knees creating edging is an illusion. 

 

Second, the concept of the continuous active inside ski isn't just about edging and rotary.  As each turn progresses the inside ski should continuously retract, allowing for both pressure transfer to the outside ski and helping to create ever increasing edge angle. Again, this is all related to the femur moving in the hip socket. 

 

Third, don't forget that as you progressively retract the inside, you  will use that continuous retraction to help in redistributing pressure to the outside ski and allow it to help keep your CoM in the proper and appropriate lateral position in relation to the increasing pressure on the outside ski. This is what allows Mikaela to be able to react instantly to unexpected situations. A good example of this is in her medal winning Olympic slalom run (watch the video and look for her major bobble).   

 

Hope this clears some things up. But again, I think you're on the right track... except for the knee engagement. 

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

Speaking of efficiency, it is good that you are focusing on your new inside during initiation, but instead of focusing on the knee pointing into the turn, move that focus down to the new inside foot/ankle. This will help your edging via less rotation of the foot/feet in the direction of the new turn. Here is a graphic I am borrowing from another board member to illustrate this:



Image B is what we want, and is what we get if we tip with our feet first. Image C is what happens when we recruit the grosser muscles around the hip joint to roll in the knee...note the direction the foot points in both images. You can try this at home--balance on one foot (support yourself with you hand up against a counter or something) and roll the lifted foot's knee outwardly as if you were moving into a new ski turn. Focus only at the knee and allow the foot to follow. You should note that the foot rotates outwardly as well, which is image C. Now, try the same but focus on tipping at the ankle first...you will find that first of all, inverting the foot (rolling it towards it's little toe) automatically cause the knee to roll out while at the same time the foot stays more or less inline with the direction the femur is pointing ala image B.

By bringing the focus to the foot/ankle first you can achieve better/more efficient edging because the ski(s) will not be inadvertently twisted by the feet and also because the load transfer from the CM to the feet will be much better aligned, allowing for a stronger, skelataly stacked turn...

My 2 cents smile.gif

zenny

I hadn't seen Zenny's reply before I wrote up my response. Great job zenny.   Had I seen it earlier I wouldn't have been so verbose.  1000 words is worth a picture... or is it the other way around??? :confused 

 

What Zenny's illustration shows is that rotary and edging are "kissing cousins" as the action comes from the femur moving within the hip socket. 

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post
 

What Zenny's illustration shows is that rotary and edging are "kissing cousins" as the action comes from the femur moving within the hip socket. 

 

Kissing cousins, maybe, but the whole point of Zenny's post is that the action should not "come from" the femur moving in the hip socket, though the femur moves in the hip socket in all cases.  In fact there is really very little that we do with our legs that doesn't involve movement in the hip socket.

 

Image C is driven more from the trying to move the knee in, most likely with a focus on directing the femur outwards.  Image B is driven more from the foot and ankle, driving the tibia outwards, with more of a result that the femur will also move in the hip socket.  

 

There is a subtle but very important distinction.  These are very very loose descriptions.  The actual muscular interactions in both cases are complex and different in both cases.  But as people in the act of participation we can think about moving our ankle or we can think of moving our knee and the results are different, as different complex interactions are triggered from our brain in that act.

post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post
 

 

Kissing cousins, maybe, but the whole point of Zenny's post is that the action should not "come from" the femur moving in the hip socket, though the femur moves in the hip socket in all cases.  In fact there is really very little that we do with our legs that doesn't involve movement in the hip socket.

 

Image C is driven more from the trying to move the knee in, most likely with a focus on directing the femur outwards.  Image B is driven more from the foot and ankle, driving the tibia outwards, with more of a result that the femur will also move in the hip socket.  

 

There is a subtle but very important distinction.  These are very very loose descriptions.  The actual muscular interactions in both cases are complex and different in both cases.  But as people in the act of participation we can think about moving our ankle or we can think of moving our knee and the results are different, as different complex interactions are triggered from our brain in that act.

Perhaps I wasn't clear in my earlier post but I was trying to describe pretty much (with slight variation) the same thing as zenny was illustrating, but perhaps not as sucinctly. 

 

Quote:
BTW:  Image C is driven more from the trying to move the knee in, most likely with a focus on directing the femur outwards.Image B is driven more from the foot and ankle, driving the tibia outwards, with more of a result that the femur will also move in the hip socket.  

I think the arrow at the knees on both B and C are misleading. The knee only APPEARS to move laterally.  It cannot mechanically move laterally.  Were it my illustration I would eliminate the arrow at the knee or color code it differently with annotations. This is a critical nuance that is overlooked and as Nomad has stated, created his knee pain.  And while the activity of Image C is largely rotary and more muscular than Image B which is more edge based, it cannot go unstated that we often blend the movements of B and C. THAT is why they I relate to them as  kissing cousins. The action of begins at the foot level in both cases and also have femur involvement The main difference between the two actions is that in Image B the skis largely react as a result of edging and the large muscles of the upper leg are used in a different way, to progressively add edge angle and almost follow the skis. While in Image C more force from the large upper leg muscles are applied to the ski to guide the skis into the turn shape, rather than follow the turn shape as in Image B.  As an example of the similarities, some instructors teach beginners to begin turns by tipping the LTE even though beginning turns are predominantly rotary. But again, we often blend the two movements. 

 

 

What also needs to be recognized is that that torque from the inside travels up from the foot,  across the pelvis to the outside hip and femur, and down the outside leg. Hence, the inside helps to provide torque (resistance, stability or whatever you want to call it)  and helps both separation and outside ski control. 
post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 

Gottit - Thanks all.

 

One more question. The inside ski has to be active - I understand that otherwise the snow will deflect it. Yet it bears very little pressure/weight. So from the foot perspective, how should I think about this ? Active ski meaning lateral pressure (across the slope) to drive/guide the turn but not vertical pressure/weight right ? This is tough to do without it having some weight on it.

 

This also goes back to vindibona's earlier point about "Pressure coming to you". Since the outside ski travels in a larger arc, it will naturally have to contend with greater forces (centrifugal etc.) so _therefore_ one needs to put more pressure on this ski to manage the pressure "coming to you". And therefore the inside ski bears lesser (but not zero) pressure/weight. But in reality, I do need to pressure both skis ... just that my CoM will be balanced on the inside edge of the outside ski and that's why it bears "more" pressure ... right ?

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad555 View Post

 

One more question. The inside ski has to be active - I understand that otherwise the snow will deflect it. Yet it bears very little pressure/weight. So from the foot perspective, how should I think about this ? Active ski meaning lateral pressure (across the slope) to drive/guide the turn but not vertical pressure/weight right ? This is tough to do without it having some weight on it.

 

Nomad...

Activity and pressure are independent of each other (and in many cases interdependent). You can have an active ski inside ski with very little pressure on it (as an infamous and not-to-be-named instructor promotes), but, in the case of a weighted release, your inside ski will be both active and have pressure on it. As you ski and your turns develop, you may be finding that it is difficult to keep pressure on the inside ski as the natural forces pull you toward your outside ski (unless you resist).   I find that should I want to (or need to ) add pressure to the inside ski it is a matter of pushing that ski down into the snow (extending) rather than shifting my CoM to be over it.  

 

Liquid Feet introduced the following Paul Lorenz article in another thread.  Perhaps it will help answer your question or give you some conceptual direction.

http://www.paullorenzclinics.com/#!inclination-or-angulation/cu0z

 

Hoping that helps clear some things up. 

post #23 of 28

vindi, the point is that there are different muscle interactions between B and C.  They are fundamentally different movements.  The diagram does not tell you the muscle movements But it does show a subtle difference, which is what happens with the foot.  But these two particular outcomes are a result of two completely different muscular activations.   Image B is not "edge based".  It is ANKLE BASED.  If the entire movement happens in terms of activating the ankle and tibia to hinge the foot outward, the knee goes with it, and yes the knee goes out and yes the femur rotates, but its a question of which muscles are being activated to make it happen.  When you try to do this movement by focusing on the femur or knee, then different muscular activations happen.

 

There are numerous people that try to make the claim that its femur rotation no matter what you do, but there is a big difference between allowing the femur to rotate, and phyiscally torquing the femur into rotation.  In the first case we can direct a tipping movement from the ankle and tibia and the femur will move around in the hip socket with just the right amount to accomodate that.  In the second case, thinking about driving tipping actions form the femur in some way, the ankle goes along more for the ride and what will happen almost for sure is Image C, the ankle will turn in.  The exact and precise way that the femur moves around in the hip socket is also quite likely not exactly the same.  Our hip socket is not a 2 dimensional joint.  It can move around like a joystick.  

 

Much ado is made about nothing with people talking about femur rotation in the hip socket as it relates to tipping the skis.  Yes of course it moves around, but if you really want to tip your skis effectively you won't be thinking about femur rotation, you will be activating your ankle and tibia and driving it from there.

post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks again. It helps me to conceptually understand the reasoning behind moves.

post #25 of 28
BTS- while one cannot argue there are some differences I must take issue with you as there are more similarities than differences. As I pointed out in my previous reply we often blend the skills between B&C. The difference in simply how much edge engagement from the ankle versus how much muscular engagement from the upper leg contributes to the blend. Would you not agree that even in most rotary turns one must release the old turns, which are edged for no other reason then the direction of skis across the slope of the hill? The difference is soley in the relative proportion of each that go into the "recipe". Consequently would you not be using similar mechanics in the release of a turn made with a C initiation as you would in the initiation as illustrated in the image B? If any turn completes with the ski traveling acrossvthe fall line some lwvel of edge release would be required. As a result there very well could be both elements in play.

One of the biggest problems in developing skiers is that they often do not use the blend and try to rely entirely on a B move or C move, failing to understand that at least some level of each (in various blends) must be present.

I am off to go skiing this morning and will experimentsI am off to go skiing this morning and will experiment with the different movements patterns 2 try to bewith the different movements patterns to examine what you are saying. it will be interesting to see if I leave the mountain agreeing with you one more confirmed in my own postulations..

Ciao 4 now. forgive the typos I'm dictating into horrible electronic touchpad
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

Speaking of efficiency, it is good that you are focusing on your new inside during initiation, but instead of focusing on the knee pointing into the turn, move that focus down to the new inside foot/ankle. This will help your edging via less rotation of the foot/feet in the direction of the new turn. Here is a graphic I am borrowing from another board member to illustrate this:



Image B is what we want, and is what we get if we tip with our feet first.
zenny

I'd add to the image the black arrow:

159364371.jpg
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 
Ok one more question then. You need b) for edging. But you also need pivoting/shmearing/rotation for the cases where just edging is not enough (speed control on steeper terrain, tight moguls, steeper but not-so-wide run) right? In that case, the pivot comes from the hip socket? Or a combination of B) and C) ?
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad555 View Post

Ok one more question then. You need b) for edging. But you also need pivoting/shmearing/rotation for the cases where just edging is not enough (speed control on steeper terrain, tight moguls, steeper but not-so-wide run) right? In that case, the pivot comes from the hip socket? Or a combination of B) and C) ?

All of the above.. blended and controlled.. All dependent on intent, need, intensity, etc...

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