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MA - I would love some tips on my carved turns

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I've been working on improving my carving on hard snow, specifically with the intent of getting faster in the gates.  I had a buddy take some video of me last weekend.  There are a few things that stand out to me already, but I was just curious what other people see in my skiing that should be fixed.  If anyone wouldn't mind taking a look I'd greatly appreciate it.  Thanks!

 

 

 

post #2 of 17

Your folding at the waist and you let your arms drop back. The Snow.......looks soft. Are those Metrons? Got  some good things going in your skiing.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
 

Your folding at the waist and you let your arms drop back. The Snow.......looks soft. Are those Metrons? Got  some good things going in your skiing.

Indeed, the snow was softer than I would have preferred on that day.  I think it hit 45* that day so it was basically spring conditions.  And those are Nordica Fire Arrows back from the first season they were out.

post #4 of 17

I agree that the body position is a little too crouched. Stack yourself over the skis more to get more energy out of them. Your arm position isn't so much too far back as extremely rigid. You have a bit of zombie arms going, and aren't letting your upper body flow with the turn. Just a lot of upper body tension, which inhibits energy transfer and flow. 

 

I also see very little energy in turn initiation. You're letting the turn come to you, rather than driving for the turn. If you're training for gates, I'd like to see a more aggressive move into the new turn. Get on the front of your skis and feed them energy, rather than just putting them on edge and letting them ride. 

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

I agree that the body position is a little too crouched. Stack yourself over the skis more to get more energy out of them. Your arm position isn't so much too far back as extremely rigid. You have a bit of zombie arms going, and aren't letting your upper body flow with the turn. Just a lot of upper body tension, which inhibits energy transfer and flow. 

 

I also see very little energy in turn initiation. You're letting the turn come to you, rather than driving for the turn. If you're training for gates, I'd like to see a more aggressive move into the new turn. Get on the front of your skis and feed them energy, rather than just putting them on edge and letting them ride. 

Thanks for the helpful comments.  I agree with pretty much everything you said except perhaps the arm comment.  I'm curious what you would rather have me do with them as I have a race coach who gets on me to keep my arms up and in front more if I do pretty much anything other than this.

 

Do you have any drills I might look into to help me initiate my turns more aggressively?

post #6 of 17
@Gladeskier231
Where was this filmed?
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

@Gladeskier231
Where was this filmed?

This is at Mad River Mountain in central Ohio.  It's actually on the race trail which is (believe it or not) the 'steepest' consistent pitch on the hill.

post #8 of 17
Are you trying to use knee angulation? If not, have a good bootfitter or coach take a look at your alignment. Your two legs are tracking differently when they are the outside leg. If yes, you're doing it asymmetrically.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharpedges View Post

Are you trying to use knee angulation? If not, have a good bootfitter or coach take a look at your alignment. Your two legs are tracking differently when they are the outside leg. If yes, you're doing it asymmetrically.

If by knee angulation you mean tipping into the turn from the ankles and knees, then yes I am trying to do this, although I also saw in the video that I'm not doing it uniformly with both legs.  That is definitely something I want to work on fixing.  I think it's more an issue with my skiing than alignment because I didn't notice this in video from previous years (or at least not as much).  That being said I can't say for certain if my alignment is correct.  I had my boots fitted at a shop I trust but I haven't had extensive alignment work done.

post #10 of 17

@Gladeskier231,

A trip to see Richard Bennett at Peak Ski and Board in Pittsburgh would do wonders for your alignment and ability to balance in the boot. You definitely have alignment issues. He would also test your fore/aft setup which may solve the need for you to ski so crunched up.

post #11 of 17

Nice carving, rolling the ankles and I don't see much of an issue with the arms. I think that this is not a good video for what may needs to be worked on. Perhaps a lateral view may better show a collapsing at the waist as compensation for a lack of forward ankle flexion in order to pressure the front of the ski? Is it possible you may also want to better align the shins in reference to a slight A framing possibly happening? While I understand that you are analyzing your free skiing for the purpose of racing as do many, in the larger scheme of things, unless one is a racer within the realm of promise, looking at your racing as a conduit for improving your free skiing may be a much more rewarding avenue. Let's face it: 99.9% of skiers will never become great racers while many more will have a chance at becoming great free skiers. Many skiers who's gate training surpasses their free skiing ability develop compensatory habits that can be difficult to overcome. If it happens too extensively during one's youth, they will reach a technical plateau rarely recovered from. At the end of the day, a better free skier makes a better racer rather than the other way around.

post #12 of 17

I like a lot of what I see.  Need to see you ski personally to offer more valid comments however I will add...  I always ask skiers who can do what you do... How do you tighten the radii of the turns you are making and part of the answer is to keep shortening and tipping the inside leg.  The inside leg will be more capable of tipping if the inside foot is pulled back or held back throughout the turn.  So do not just lean on the side cut of the ski but keep tipping and shortening the inside leg.  Hold the counter through the end of the turn.  Do not back off the counter balancing and counter acting as the forces build.  YM

post #13 of 17

Very nice carving. Sure you might benefit from proper alignment, who wouldnt, but its foremost a question of technique and milidge. I really like what I see. Some have commented that you are too much forward. I dont think so. This is how racers ski. They are much more forward oriented than people think. Especially in GS. Especially jr racers. So I dont see a problem with that. The alignment issue people are addressing is your tendency to A-frame. To rid it a good drill to practice is to ski without ski poles and use your inside hand to press your inside knee towards the outside. Thats right, the outside. Usually you see people doing the drill the opposite way, pressing the inside knee towards the inside. IMO pressing the knee towards the outside is better because it teaches your muscles to press your knee towards the inside of the turn. If you press it towards the inside your muscles will work in the opposite direction and you will end up with an even more persistant A-frame.

post #14 of 17

I like a lot of what I see.  Not must to pick on.  Others have commented on crouching, folding, etc.  I'm seeing these as symptoms of something else: Your fore/aft "balance point" over the skis.  I think it is too far back, but just by a bit.  I'm seeing this not only in your body position, but in how your skis are reacting to input. If you can somehow find a spot to balance on just slightly ahead of where you are now I think it will correct all the issues.  I believe that your upper body will be able to be more erect, your lower body will be able to create more angles, and as your skis function better as you can trust your skis to get further away from your body laterally. 

 

What I've been working on is to focus on trying to keep a small amount pressure continuously on a very small spot on my skis about 2" ahead of my toe pieces. I think this has really helps my skiing in many ways. It is a very small nuance, but I think might have a significant influence over many aspects of your skiing.  Obviously you will have to find your own "sweet spot", but I believe it is further forward than the spot you're balancing on currently.  Just my opinion. 

post #15 of 17
Agree. Exaggerate your fore/aft pressure with your ankle flex not your upper body. This will help you find that sweet spot vind is talking about. Folding restricts your lower body movements. It's like running. Some forward upper body is needed. Too much and well you can't run as fast.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gladeskier231 View Post

Do you have any drills I might look into to help me initiate my turns more aggressively?
Whitepass turns
post #17 of 17
IMO-you're rushing for a "final form" rather then taking a little longer to get to max angulation. It's the old "light switch" vs "dimmer switch" analogy.
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