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Scraping Advice

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I started maintaining my skis last season and did all the tuning myself with no issues.  This year for some reason I have found scrapping with a plastic scrapper really hard.  The wax just doesn't want to come off.  Typically I don't do a hot scrape, I let the skis sit overnight before I scrape them.  I thought it was a dull scraper so I bought a sharpener but that didn't help.  I ended up using a steel scraper and that did a great job.  Am I not using a enough wax? Too dull plastic scraper?

 

Wax I'm using is swix CH7.

post #2 of 18
Before you cool the skis, and while the wax is still warm, run the iron down the ski with a sheet of fiberlene. That makes the wax more even, removes excess, and even dirt while you're at it. Huge help when you scrape later.

When I use hard wax, after it's cooled, I rewarm it a bit and scrape.

If the sharpener you bought is this thing you drag it thru, has notches in it, that thing is useless.TOK-1910-toko-ski-scraper-sharpener-tool__71627.1405405238.1280.1280.jpg?c=2
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

LOL that is the one I bought.  I'll try the fiberlene suggestion.

post #4 of 18

Sounds like you have a dulllll scraper.  Nothing wrong with using a steel scraper IF, and this is the uber imoprtant part, you do it properly and if you DON'T, you can do a whole lot of damage in a hurry.  The amount of pressure you apply when using a steel scraper is VERY important, no more than absolutely necessary.  Using a steel scraper takes a little getting used to and you'll need to develop a  "feel" for using one as you can over scrape when using a steel scraper very quickly. 

post #5 of 18
@voghan, buy a piece of drywall screen at the hardware store. Take a piece of 2x4 and clamp it to a table on top of the screen so that the screen is exposed on one side (I prefer the far side). Brace the scraper against the 2x4 and rub it back and forth on the screen, periodically checking the edges being worked for sharpness, and unclamping things to expose a fresh bit of screen as it gets clogged with plastic, and flip the scraper 180* if one edge gets sharper than the other (sometimes the side of a 2x4 isn't exactly 90*). Then flip the scraper so the dull edges are on the bottom and repeat. Clean the plastic off the screen by flapping it flat on the table or scrubbing (dry) with a stiff brush.

The result isn't as good as a new scraper or one that's been sharpened using a $250 scraper sharpener, but it's pretty darned sharp. Since I started using this method, one scraper's four edges last for about 2 pairs of skis. I used to use the exact sharpener you had and the results were yecch; I never knew how bad it was until I bought a couple of nice stiff scrapers and couldn't believe how quickly they did the job.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

@voghan, buy a piece of drywall screen at the hardware store. Take a piece of 2x4 and clamp it to a table on top of the screen so that the screen is exposed on one side (I prefer the far side). Brace the scraper against the 2x4 and rub it back and forth on the screen, periodically checking the edges being worked for sharpness, and unclamping things to expose a fresh bit of screen as it gets clogged with plastic, and flip the scraper 180* if one edge gets sharper than the other (sometimes the side of a 2x4 isn't exactly 90*). Then flip the scraper so the dull edges are on the bottom and repeat. Clean the plastic off the screen by flapping it flat on the table or scrubbing (dry) with a stiff brush.

The result isn't as good as a new scraper or one that's been sharpened using a $250 scraper sharpener, but it's pretty darned sharp. Since I started using this method, one scraper's four edges last for about 2 pairs of skis. I used to use the exact sharpener you had and the results were yecch; I never knew how bad it was until I bought a couple of nice stiff scrapers and couldn't believe how quickly they did the job.

I've saw a video were a guy had a file built into his work bench.  I might do something like that but then again I may just buy a new scraper.

post #7 of 18

Stick with the "dull" steel. 

post #8 of 18

Your scraper is dull and you're not sharpening it properly.  Get a new plastic scraper or two.  

 

I had the same issue and I couldn't believe the difference a new scraper made.  Now I need to learn how to sharpen it.

post #9 of 18
He can buy a new scraper and it'll be new for one pair of skis. He needs to sharpen the one he owns.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

@sibhusky Buying a new one was more a joke.  I own files (13 & 16 tpcm) but haven't used them to sharpen a scraper.

 

@Jacques I've watched all of your videos (well, not all the park ones).  I noticed you use a plastic on the edges and steel on the base to remove wax.  That is why i started trying the steel scraper.

 

I'm waxing four sets of skis when I wax and tune.  All have black bases so I'm pretty sure i'd notice if I took off more than wax with the steel scraper. I do find the steel scraper does a very easy job but I it seems most people say to use a plastic scraper.  My house has a old hard wood workshop where I work on my skis.  I actually am thinking of buying a file and attaching it to the workbench.  

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post
 

 I do find the steel scraper does a very easy job but I it seems most people say to use a plastic scraper. 

Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord said it best:  “There is one body that knows more than anybody, and that is everybody”.

 

Everybody knows to use a plastic scraper, even if somebody thinks steel is a good idea.

post #12 of 18
Drywall screen like Litterbug put out there. Inexpensive, simple to use, effective which is an admirable mantra for any tool.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post
 

@sibhusky Buying a new one was more a joke.  I own files (13 & 16 tpcm) but haven't used them to sharpen a scraper.

 

@Jacques I've watched all of your videos (well, not all the park ones).  I noticed you use a plastic on the edges and steel on the base to remove wax.  That is why i started trying the steel scraper.

 

I'm waxing four sets of skis when I wax and tune.  All have black bases so I'm pretty sure i'd notice if I took off more than wax with the steel scraper. I do find the steel scraper does a very easy job but I it seems most people say to use a plastic scraper.  My house has a old hard wood workshop where I work on my skis.  I actually am thinking of buying a file and attaching it to the workbench.  


Yes.  A not sharp steel beats a plastic scraper every time.  Smooth the edges of the scraper with sandpaper on a flat surface.  It should be true, but not sharp.  This must be done right when you get one.  They are usually very sharp off the shelf.

post #14 of 18
I just have a clamp, a piece of two by four, and very fine sandpaper. It was free as it was in the house shop I tune in. Every once in a while I reposition the sandpaper.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Yes.  A not sharp steel beats a plastic scraper every time.  Smooth the edges of the scraper with sandpaper on a flat surface.  It should be true, but not sharp.  This must be done right when you get one.  They are usually very sharp off the shelf.

 

Jacques - since many steel scrapers are very flexible, don't you worry about creating a concave base if you scrape with steel?

 

It sounds like you don't want a burr on the scraper either - as would be normal for a scraper being used for woodworking - you just want a flat edge?

 

OP - I sharpen my plastic scraper with my metal scraper - just put a burr on the metal scraper with a burnisher (you can use a large screwdriver or a ratchet - don't need a dedicated burnishing tool), then lock the plastic scraper in a vice and use the metal scraper to scrape a new sharp edge on the plastic one. Works for me, but may take some practice to get it right.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Yes.  A not sharp steel beats a plastic scraper every time.  Smooth the edges of the scraper with sandpaper on a flat surface.  It should be true, but not sharp.  This must be done right when you get one.  They are usually very sharp off the shelf.

 

Jacques - since many steel scrapers are very flexible, don't you worry about creating a concave base if you scrape with steel?  No, that's totally controllable.

 

It sounds like you don't want a burr on the scraper either - as would be normal for a scraper being used for woodworking - you just want a flat edge?  Yes, that's true!  I use a sharp one for flattening.

 

OP - I sharpen my plastic scraper with my metal scraper - just put a burr on the metal scraper with a burnisher (you can use a large screwdriver or a ratchet - don't need a dedicated burnishing tool), then lock the plastic scraper in a vice and use the metal scraper to scrape a new sharp edge on the plastic one. Works for me, but may take some practice to get it right.

Answers in bold.

post #17 of 18

I use a 90 degree side edge bevel with a coarse file. I lightly use it frequently (after each ski) to clean off the built up wax. Then I gently resharpen the scraper after each pair. Don't forget to file the face of the scraper also, to eliminate any small burrs. I do need to keep the file clean with a file brush. Considering how well the drywall screen works on smoothing the topsheet edges I will have to try it on the scraper.

 

Once you are done buff the base with white fibertex to open up the structure. I use an old grout float to provide even pressure

post #18 of 18

Something nobody has mentioned yet:  it is possible, if you're rushing and not at least a little careful, to end up rounding the ends of the scraper, such that you don't have a completely flat edge.   Long strokes with even pressure against a flat surface (so, the long way on a drywall screen) can help avoid this.

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