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List of trails with slope degrees

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

is there a listing / map  of trails with slope degrees anywhere?  It is pretty obvious that not all black diamonds are the same  and this goes for all colors and shapes!  I am sure it is part of a hidden advertisement and ski resorts most definitely do not list all the trails. but what about at least most challenging ones? or perhaps some unofficial ratings ?   

 

I just came back from Utah hopping from Snowbird to Park city to Canyons where I was using  ski tracks app. So for Park city it showed 34  degrees as the steepest slope and  I assume it was at the Jupiter bowl, yet it looked more steep to me. I know it is very presumptive of me, but  is there a source where I can verify it?    

post #2 of 22
Seems like this has been a topic before? There was some website showing colors for slopes...
post #3 of 22
My husband used his inclinometer on a section of the slope directly under the Jupiter chairlift shortly before it reaches the top (skiers left, dropping down onto the main face after a flatter bumpy section) -- Main Bowl, I think -- and it said 41-42 deg, which seems about right to me, even if not completely scientific. There are steeper runs than that in the vicinity too. Definitely plenty more than 34 deg.
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Seems like this has been a topic before? There was some website showing colors for slopes...


This one?

 

http://3dskimaps.com/

post #5 of 22
Hillmap.com is complete and easy to use. Color by slope is on the overlay menu.
post #6 of 22

I love Hillmap.com ... It should be accurate according to the topo maps, but may not account for snow loading changing the slope, or for shorter local variation. 

 

For Jupiter Bowl, depending on where you were it looks like between 35 and 45 degrees for the steepest parts. The path below for 6 Bells looks to be the steepest based on the contour lines, and just hits 45 degrees or so.

 

 

You can also use the color overlay, but the colors represent 10 degree steps, which isn't very exact. 

 

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thank  you very much looks amazing! 

post #8 of 22

Seems quite useless as snow deposit changes yearly, and that in turn can effect the slope angle. Not to mention an entrance can be super steep, then quickly level out to a less extreme angle.

post #9 of 22

The snow/ice conditions affect difficulty just as much as pitch does for 90% of the in bounds marked trails on any particular mountain.  There are trails that I love to tear up on a good day that terrify me on a bad day.

post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 

Seems quite useless as snow deposit changes yearly, and that in turn can effect the slope angle. Not to mention an entrance can be super steep, then quickly level out to a less extreme angle.

 

Well sure, if you only care about shorter where the snow and slope areas. But it still gives you a very good idea of how slopes compare overall. For instance, before my recent Vail trip, I was looking at some of the slopes to get an idea of what a "Vail black diamond" was compared to places I had skied before. Once I got there, I found that it actually did give me a pretty good idea.

post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 

Interesting that hillmap.com  is more robust yet limited to US resorts.

post #12 of 22
It gets its raw data from the "National Elevation Dataset" published by the US Geological Survey. So of course it is US only. I was processing some of that data on my own before someone here (tball maybe) posted about Hillmap.

One advantage of self processing is that you can tune the info display to skiing-relevant angles.
post #13 of 22

So if I jump off a cornice will my ski app show 90 degrees as my steepest slope skied?

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

So if I jump off a cornice will my ski app show 90 degrees as my steepest slope skied?

 

Well it would depend on how it calculates maximum slope. I don't know how Ski Tracks does it, so this is purely speculation.

 

But I'd think that it would probably find the vertical change over a certain minimum distance, such that both your position and altitude change would be easily detectable/calculable. I don't think it would be looking at the change in distance and change in altitude over very short distances; I'd think it would be more in the 50-100 foot range, to lessen the amount of calculation it does and account for intermittent GPS error.

 

So, for instance, if you skied down a staircase, it's probably going to report approximately the overall slope of the staircase as the max, not the individual 90 degree drops. I know I've taken some short (4-5 feet) nearly vertical slope entries, and it never seems to record them - I don't know how it would.

post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post
 

 

Well sure, if you only care about shorter where the snow and slope areas. But it still gives you a very good idea of how slopes compare overall. For instance, before my recent Vail trip, I was looking at some of the slopes to get an idea of what a "Vail black diamond" was compared to places I had skied before. Once I got there, I found that it actually did give me a pretty good idea.


You can't just stand at the top of something and evaluate if you can ski it?

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 


You can't just stand at the top of something and evaluate if you can ski it?

 

Oh - this was long before I actually went out there. Just trying to get a sense of what to expect.

 

I also like to compare things I have already skied to see if they were as steep as they seemed sometimes.

 

It's the same reason I use Ski Tracks... there's nothing all that useful about knowing my speed and vertical, but I like the data for comparing days and runs.

post #17 of 22
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

The snow/ice conditions affect difficulty just as much as pitch does for 90% of the in bounds marked trails on any particular mountain.  There are trails that I love to tear up on a good day that terrify me on a bad day.

 

Yep.  For some reason people get so caught up by the pitch.  A 45 degree slope covered in boot deep powder is way easier than a 35 degree slope of scraped up crud and boilerplate.

post #19 of 22

Or 10 degree slopes with 3 feet of powder. Those are a lot of work

post #20 of 22
Oh come on. It's still cool to know you have skied an X degree slope. I'm not too cool to care, and I make no apologies.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Oh come on. It's still cool to know you have skied an X degree slope. I'm not too cool to care, and I make no apologies.


hmmmm...never once thought about the pitch of what I ski.

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Oh come on. It's still cool to know you have skied an X degree slope. I'm not too cool to care, and I make no apologies.


hmmmm...never once thought about the pitch of what I ski.

Maybe you aren't a numbers guy.  How about comparatively:  Did you ever think to yourself, "hmmmm,  the bottom of that run was steeper than the top." ?

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