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Why workout for Skiing?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
If you ski properly, you need no workout, you just need balance. Picture this, you are at the end of a right medium radius turn, standing on your edges. If you relax a little, your center of mass will seek the fall line. Your body will go downhill, your skis will go flat, then to your new edges, then you are into your next turn about to start at square one. Just balance your skeletal frame against your edges and you don't need any muscles. Whoever said leaning was wrong never got good at it.
post #2 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by IAM#1:
If you ski properly, you need no workout, you just need balance. Picture this, you are at the end of a right medium radius turn, standing on your edges. If you relax a little, your center of mass will seek the fall line. Your body will go downhill, your skis will go flat, then to your new edges, then you are into your next turn about to start at square one. Just balance your skeletal frame against your edges and you don't need any muscles. Whoever said leaning was wrong never got good at it.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Go skiing every other day for about 3 hours You don't need to work out then (You need to ice your knees though [img]smile.gif[/img]).
www.snowworld.nl
post #3 of 22
I think it helps prevent pulling muscles, improves endurance so you can ski longer with better control. "The focus of ski conditioning is to prepare you for the agility and endurance you'll need for the ski season" is what Dion Cantellay wrote from PSIA.
post #4 of 22
Why work out?... Say you live in the East, but the Wasatch is your church. For the 3 weeks out of the year i get to attend the ceremony, I want to be in the right shape to enjoy it. On powder days, those who scuff at working out meet at the bar at 10AM, and the meeting lasts all day long. If flat groomers is your game, you are right, conditioning is not that important.
post #5 of 22
Moguls
post #6 of 22
because you ski fast and actually know how to make turns, and realize what kinds of forces you put on your knees.

sure, if you skid or slide your turns and have decent balance, your legs don't get too tired.

but you also suck as a skier.
post #7 of 22
If you do not work out for skiing then there is absolutley no way you can keep up with the ski town extras.

26 days straight x 6 hrs minimum + clinics and coach commitments + bar work and the odd sexual encounter. I work out in preparation of the enjoyment of "ski town living".... IAM#1 skids and slids the groomers and goes home early.

remember, carving is not confined to the hill, nor is fitness just a sport thing!

Oz [img]smile.gif[/img]

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ February 21, 2002 07:22 PM: Message edited 1 time, by man from oz ]</font>
post #8 of 22
Although the responses have been valid, I smell suckerfish and troll bait gone bad!
post #9 of 22
When I was in my twenty-somethings, all I had to do is replay Blizzard of Ahhs over and over again while doing 12 oz curls.
Now with 40 looming this year, it appears the "fast twitch" aspect of muscle control does respond better to conditioning. Stair stepper and lunges (12 oz have been increased to full pints). Although my mother has always said... "hops, barley and lactic acid make for a bad combination".
Thank God the Canadians came up with AC&C's.
post #10 of 22
To ski with pure efficiency on green and blue IAM#1 may have a point. But to ski like a pro, skiing is more athletic than EVER. Even on green and blue.

jlaw
breck
post #11 of 22
Spoken like a true typical Weekend Warrior. If all you want to do is ski and don't care if you ski well, prevent injury, have any endurance, never progress in your ability and be very sore the next day, by all means don't work out. You are the one who will miss out on all the benefits and how it could be.
post #12 of 22
Balance and core stability need to be properly integrated with strength and endurance. Those who think they are above having to work on these areas, generally end up tearing their ACLs. aaor something else.
post #13 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by IAM#1:
If you ski properly, you need no workout, you just need balance. Picture this, you are at the end of a right medium radius turn, standing on your edges. If you relax a little, your center of mass will seek the fall line. Your body will go downhill, your skis will go flat, then to your new edges, then you are into your next turn about to start at square one. Just balance your skeletal frame against your edges and you don't need any muscles. Whoever said leaning was wrong never got good at it.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hmmmmm, okay, how would you control your speed? With your description, you would always be at the mercy of hill pitch and gravity. To dig your edges in or counter your hips, you'd need a muscle or two. In your scenario, you'd never be able to stop! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #14 of 22
IAM hash One, please advise me where you will be skiing, so that I can avoid the area.
Do you exercise for any activities you participate in?

S
post #15 of 22
Like many things, you don't have to be fit to ski - hills all over the world are littered with the evidence - but it surely helps!

The only time I've had a bad ski injury was when I went on a press freebie to Hintertux at very short notice after being in slug mode for some months beforehand. First morning out, flat light, hit some toffee, lost it, and pop! One ACL neatly torn. No more ski-ing for me that season.

Lesson learnt - no matter how wonderful your technique, it surely has to help if your quads and hamstrings are in good shape and you've got at least reasonable muscle tone everywhere else.

Not to mention just being able to make it from top to bottom on a long one without having to pull over half-way down!

Much more fun, no?

[img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #16 of 22
I think I hear the line screaming off the reel, but I'll bite anyway. If you don't work out you don't ski where I do or at least not for very long.
post #17 of 22
I guess you don't live at sea level and do any hiking UP at 12,000FT.
post #18 of 22

Absolutely agree!!! Skiing is the sport for the lazy!!! Lift takes you up, gravity takes you down!!! Only to resist gravity do you need strength !!! Point your skis down and enjoy the ride !!!

VK
post #19 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by gonzostrike:
because you ski fast and actually know how to make turns, and realize what kinds of forces you put on your knees.

sure, if you skid or slide your turns and have decent balance, your legs don't get too tired.

but you also suck as a skier.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


But if you stay in shape through-out the year you can ski fast making solid turns, without your legs getting as tired.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ March 25, 2002 10:13 AM: Message edited 1 time, by EstCstSkr ]</font>
post #20 of 22
Yeah, but we know the REAL reason!

So that you can look good in stretch pants! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #21 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bethany:
Yeah, but we know the REAL reason!

So that you can look good in stretch pants! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

all for you baby.
post #22 of 22
Now that I am a mature, wise 42 yr. old and married for 18 years, I don't notice the young, nubile, physically fit females in the stretch pants.

It's a whole other world at 12,000 feet. Gotta be in shape or don't bother.
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