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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Sidewall Planning Skips...How to smooth them out
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Sidewall Planning Skips...How to smooth them out

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Any suggestions on how to smooth out the skips created from poor sidewall planing technique?  

post #2 of 14

What tool did you use that gave you unsatisfactory results?   If you don't have one already, get a sidewall planer to fix the spots you don't like. 

 

www.slidewright.com

 

http://www.skituning101.com/2010/03/ski-tuning-101-presents.html

 

 

If you did use a planer and do not have a smooth sidewall, sandpaper will get you there eventually.

post #3 of 14
Start out taking off the thinnest possible bit, gradually tightening it to get to where you want. Since the skips are already there, sand them, or put a file in a side bevel guide at say, seven degrees and smooth it until you can sandpaper it.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post
 

What tool did you use that gave you unsatisfactory results? 

 

Seconded - what tool?   

 

Skipping is symptomatic of an aggressive cutting angle - aggressive means trying to cut too much at once.     This can sometimes happen if you have the blade turned the wrong way about - like can *easily* happen in the leftmost tool in the pic Snowfan posted.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Start out taking off the thinnest possible bit, gradually tightening it to get to where you want. Since the skips are already there, sand them, or put a file in a side bevel guide at say, seven degrees and smooth it until you can sandpaper it.

 

For quick results a pansar is best.     But in a sure hand (and turned the right way, held as vertically as possible) even a steel scraper or chisel will work.

post #5 of 14

Wet sandpaper.  Back up with something.  Sand away.  After more work you will get better at the planing.  Always go easy when planing.  Take a bit at a time.  Then take another bit as needed. 

 

On the other side of the coin, it's not that big of a deal. Some sidewall material is very hard, others softer.  Don't get too worried about it.  Main thing is you need to clear the side edge to tune.  The checks won't kill you.

post #6 of 14
Last week I had to plane some sidewall on my Geishas and found that the shape of the ski right above the edge was different at different points in the length of the ski--meaning that a setting that took a tiny amount off the tip might not even make contact with the sidewall at the middle of the ski and cut way too deep near the tail. So despite a lot of care with the adjustments, I still ended up with a few skips.

One thing I've had success with is working over the damaged area with the tool adjusted to take off just the top of the bump(s). I start with light pressure but firm grip on the tool, adjusting the blade in tiny increments as I plane down the rough area, until it's gone.

But sanding works just fine. I roll sandpaper around a pencil, marker, file, or whatever, depending on the shape I'm going for.
post #7 of 14

I have been using the Mountain Tek tool for years.  Very easy to adjust and can cut cleanly with the correct adjustment and right amount of pressure.  I think I paid 12 bucks for it on clearance.  

post #8 of 14

.

 

I use the Toko sidewall planer pro. It works great and easy to use. I think they are expensive but I picked it up during the summer for $30. Good investment.

 

 

 

5549870__62803.1407944493.1280.1280.jpg?c=2 

post #9 of 14

I also use the mountain tek one. The first few times I butchered the sidewalls by trying to take too much off at once. Once I dialed it back and took the minimum amount off per pass, there were no more slips. As far as cleaning existing ones, if you are at the beginning of the planing and have lots left, just keep going gently and lightly and make smooth passes. If you are almost done, you can try a coarse or medium scotch brite pad around a block of some sort.

post #10 of 14
I just had this same problem happen to me. Usually I take down my sidewalls with a file slow and steady, but I just splurged on the Ski Visions base flattener and after reading all their website, they say you can use the cutting edge to skive off the sidewall cleanly. In fact, here's the picture from their page:

Learn from my experience - don't try it. Whatever they were talking about with the edge, the tool just kept diving into my sidwall and the whole things had to be sanded down like crazy to smooth it out. Before I ever try this again, I'll take two cheap, really sharp carpenters chisels and round off one corner (one L, one R), then skive with them, so I can make sure it's cutting with the right edge. From more extensive research, it looks like ski visions had a skiver for it's edge sharp tool, but I don't think they make that anymore, so now they just are trying to claim that the base cutter can be your all purpose skiver. Don't believe it.

One more thing - I came across this in researching my own sidewall disaster - you can apparently "melt" the sidewall a little with acetone blotted on a paper towel, being very careful not to get any on your bases. The video I saw had the guy using in on a black ABS sidewall, and mine are the soft white plastic stuff, so I didn't try it, but I'd be curious to know if other folks have done this?
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks.  I used the Swix tool pictured in your photo.

post #12 of 14
And which direction did you use it? Hard to explain, I know. I had issues with mine when I first started, moving it the wrong direction initially, then taking off way too much at once. It's taken me a while to get the hang of starting slowly so it just barely is taking anything off and just turning the thumb screw about a fifth of a turn or less each time, tightening it.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post

One more thing - I came across this in researching my own sidewall disaster - you can apparently "melt" the sidewall a little with acetone blotted on a paper towel, being very careful not to get any on your bases. The video I saw had the guy using in on a black ABS sidewall, and mine are the soft white plastic stuff, so I didn't try it, but I'd be curious to know if other folks have done this?
One of the Start Haus ski tuning videos shows Jim doing just that; maybe that's the one you looked at. I think it might work on flat (sandwich) white sidewalls; you might pick up a little bottle of nail polish remover to make sure it works before buying a bunch of it because acetone is pretty toxic stuff. And ventilate the hell out of the place while you use it.
post #14 of 14
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