or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Breathable Ski Gloves?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi, I'm trying to figure out what gloves are really breathable.  Here's the story behind this.  I've owned a number of crappy gloves over the decades, and so have my kids.  Some that I recall had material like "Aqua Stop" and "Waterguard" and other names like that. They would get damp in normal skiing without sweating hard, and take forever to dry.  If they were not put on a heater they would start to stink like running shoes.

 

A few years ago I got some Dakine Scout gloves.  I also use them for snowkiting where you can really soak the gloves (from the inside) more than DH skiing riding the lifts.  I never have to put these things on a drier (other than after a rainy day).  They breath spectacularly well.   I see the ones online now are made with  a material called 'DK Dry".  I'm not sure if that was the case with the ones I probably got 5 years ago.  I could pay a bit more and get some Goretex gloves.  I emailed Dakine and they told me that the Goretex ones are more waterproof and more breathable.

 

Now the problem.  I just looked at some terrible mitts my daughter has they get wet and stay wet for days if not dried.  The tag on them says Goretex!!  I'm amazed her "goretex" gloves could breath so poorly.  Could they maybe not be Goretex?  Are there fakes out there?  Either there is something wrong with the goretex in her mitts, or there's no way that I want to pay extra to get non-breathable gloves like hers.

 

So after my long story, here are 2 simple questions:

1. Dakine Scout or Dakine Frontier Goretex Gloves - can anyone tell me if they have these and whether I can expect them to breath so well that they are not soggy for over a day after wearing them?

2. Goretex gloves in general - do they breath so well that they don't need special drying attention to be ready for the next day?

 

Thanks,

Peter

post #2 of 10

I took a couple of pairs of Goretex gloves on a trip where it was much warmer than I expected. Fortunate that I had two pairs because they got sweat-soaked every day. It's not Goretex' fault. Any glove will get sweat soaked if it is too warm for the conditions and exertion level. When I run in the summer my very thin, extraordinarily breathable track singlet gets sweat soaked. Goretex will breath away water vapor. It will not breath liquid sweat. Nothing will. Remember--the whole idea behind Goretex, or any waterproof breathable fabric, is that it allows vapor to pass but not liquid water--whether that liquid water is rain or sweat doesn't matter.   FWIW I've had just as much luck with keeping my hands dry with my cheap Kinco's. But I always alternate between pairs to let them dry. Nice thing about Kinco's--you can afford to have several pairs. (BTW--IMO the 94HK's are just as good as the 901's unless you ride a lot of rope tows, and cheaper.)

post #3 of 10

I like my Marmot Randonnee gloves, which purport to have some amount of Gortex in them.  I've used them happily skiing from mid-high teens to low-mid thirties.  High thirties had me reaching for lighter gloves.

 

I haven't noticed them getting clammy.  A few times I've gotten snow in them and thought they'd be wet for the rest of the day only to be pleasantly surprised that they're dry a bit later.  I never need to do anything special to dry them for the next day.

 

First post! :-)

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

As a brief update, I found out my daughter has 2 similar looking pairs and only one pair is goretex.  It seems to be the other ones that stay wet super long.  Still though, her goretex mitts were wetter than my Dakine Scouts would be when I put them on the drier.  That was after night skiing for maybe 3 hours on short groomed runs with no climbing, at -18C with windchill added on top of that.  Hardly sweating conditions!

 

And yes, if I go for a run with temps below freezing I can soak a fleece when there is no shell over it.  Warm air meeting cold does lead to condensation somewhere if it is being generated fast enough.  But my current gloves seem to do a great job managing it, and I'm hoping to find more!

 

Peter

post #5 of 10

I basically have given up on gloves with waterproof membranes because none breathe enough to move sweat away from my hands, so unless it's rain or sleet, or playing in the snow with kids, I don't use them.

 

My sweaty hands, even inside insulated gloves, tend to get cold fast on a lift. The best solution I've found is a water resistant softshell glove with a natural leather palm and removable liner+ baby powder on my hands. Even then I will get cold hands on a long lift ride when temps are low, but at the end of the day I take out the liner and it dries by morning. If it gets smelly it can be washed separately from the shell. If I could stand mittens then I would go with a similarly designed mitten. The extra space around the palm and fingers should allow the sweat to evaporate and move out of the glove instead of soaking in.

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
 

I basically have given up on gloves with waterproof membranes because none breathe enough to move sweat away from my hands, so unless it's rain or sleet, or playing in the snow with kids, I don't use them.

 

My sweaty hands, even inside insulated gloves, tend to get cold fast on a lift. The best solution I've found is a water resistant softshell glove with a natural leather palm and removable liner+ baby powder on my hands. Even then I will get cold hands on a long lift ride when temps are low, but at the end of the day I take out the liner and it dries by morning. If it gets smelly it can be washed separately from the shell. If I could stand mittens then I would go with a similarly designed mitten. The extra space around the palm and fingers should allow the sweat to evaporate and move out of the glove instead of soaking in.

You might want to try drysol on your hands to stop the sweating. Or you could have a surgeon cut your sympathetic nerve chain in your chest, but that might be a bit extreme. 

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

You might want to try drysol on your hands to stop the sweating. Or you could have a surgeon cut your sympathetic nerve chain in your chest, but that might be a bit extreme. 

Yeah, there's  a lot less drastic surgery using compressions bands. But I don't actually have sweaty palms on a regular basis. My brother, on the other hand, does have this problem. He even considered the surgery.

post #8 of 10
hestra heli glove, mitten or 3 finger = problem solved. Removeable liner(s) and very breathable. My hands can get a bit swampy in the Hestra VCF and Seths (leather) and can be cold when its really cold. These things are the ticket.
post #9 of 10
What really helps is a thin liner glove, or several if you sweat a lot. They absorb all the moisture and much easier to dry than wet gloves.

I use Black Diamond renegade for not too cold days with liner glove and it never gets wet. The goretex xcr is supposedly more breathable than regular goretex as well.
post #10 of 10
Agree on the liner gloves. They work as a base layer to distribute sweat so it doesnt pool to liquid.
Liners keep you warm when you're cold and keep you cool when you are hot. How do they know? Magic!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion