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Hand warmers, keeping back warm, two Qs.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I bought a box of those iron powder in a paper sachet hand warmers last year (the one from costco if you are familiar with it), used them a few times and wasn't impressed. Yesterday was -20 with -30 windchill, and they were pretty much useless. They just don't produce enough heat. They'll stay warmish for 10 or 11 hours but that's not what I want, I'd rather they dump all the heat within 4 or 5 hours. The only time they get warm enough was when I stuffed them inside my down vest, at home. Did I just buy the crappy ones, or do they all suck?

Another problem I found yesterday was between riding the lift and absorbing moguls, my layers of clothing and even powder skirt eventually ride up in the back and doesn't keep small of back warm anymore. With gloves on it's impossible to fix it on the go too. Any ideas other than buying a one-piece?
post #2 of 20

We've used those as well and I think the trick is placing several in a pair of gloves at once.  Personally, I'd say buy better gloves and take more warm up breaks.  I've skied in those conditions in Minnesota and Montana and can relate to how cold that gets. We pull out the heavy duty gear when it gets that cold.

 

As for the backside issue, buy a belt.  I had the same issue and bought a belt for my ski pants.  You can look for a longer base layer top but the belt helps keep the pants from sliding and the top from ridding up.

post #3 of 20

You need mittens for the really cold days.  Not only are they warmer than gloves, but the heaters work better because your fingers are near them.  And glove liners help also.  On below zero days with mittens, liners, and warmers, my hands are toasty.

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
My gloves are pretty decent, goretex,primaloft and all that stuff. I have a liner but that means no more space for more than one hand warmer. Looks like I have to look for good mittens.
post #5 of 20

Ski pants with a bib and brace will keep the wind and snow off your back. If you're still cold back there then adhesive heat pads will do the job. I'm on an eternal quest for warmer gloves, Mittens + liners+ warmers dont keep my hands warm on the cold days. Im fine everywhere else, just my fingers go numb very quickly.

 

edit

there seems something wrong about a guy from tropical  Queensland Australia giving a Canadian advice on how to keep warm:rolleyes, it makes as much sense as you telling me what sunscreen works best! 

post #6 of 20

Swany Toaster mittens are awesome.  There's a built in liner and a side zipper to allow you to take your fingers out to do things.  I put a hand warmer in that opening between the liner and the outer glove.

 

I slide the handwarmer to the back of my hand during skiing, but on the lift move it to my palm and when my thumbs get cold take them out of their finger holes and clutch the warmer in my mittens.  Works good.  I use Hothands warmers.  Buy them by the case from amazon.

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mauricem View Post

Ski pants with a bib and brace will keep the wind and snow off your back. If you're still cold back there then adhesive heat pads will do the job. I'm on an eternal quest for warmer gloves, Mittens + liners+ warmers dont keep my hands warm on the cold days. Im fine everywhere else, just my fingers go numb very quickly.

edit
there seems something wrong about a guy from tropical  Queensland Australia giving a Canadian advice on how to keep warm:rolleyes , it makes as much sense as you telling me what sunscreen works best! 

Sure, the bigger the number the better it works. biggrin.gif
post #8 of 20

I've heard that expiration dates mean a lot with hand warmers - but don't have much first hand knowledge. I do know that the couple I've used were hot enough that I wasn't sure I wanted it against my skin.

post #9 of 20

I like the Zippo A-frame warmers....  Uses lighter fluid and lasts a long time!

 

http://www.amazon.com/Zippo-40306-Hand-Warmer-Chrome/dp/B00ABA08F6/

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl

Another problem I found yesterday was between riding the lift and absorbing moguls, my layers of clothing and even powder skirt eventually ride up in the back and doesn't keep small of back warm anymore. With gloves on it's impossible to fix it on the go too. Any ideas other than buying a one-piece?

I assume you mean other than a one-piece ski suit.  I wear my very old one piece cross country nylon or whatever suit as my base layer and I would never do without it.  If I couldn't get one of those I would at least consider a once piece long underwear/shirt set.  I wouldn't ski without a one piece something somewhere, esp considering falling on a powder day.

post #11 of 20

 

These are amazing on super cold days.

post #12 of 20

OP, you just need to get with the times. Jacket must be no higher than #264, at minimum. The lower it hangs, the better. 

 

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

My gloves are pretty decent, goretex,primaloft and all that stuff. I have a liner but that means no more space for more than one hand warmer. Looks like I have to look for good mittens.

 

Have you considered overmitts/ mitten shells?     http://raggedmountain.com/handwear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post


Another problem I found yesterday was between riding the lift and absorbing moguls, my layers of clothing and even powder skirt eventually ride up in the back and doesn't keep small of back warm anymore. With gloves on it's impossible to fix it on the go too. Any ideas other than buying a one-piece?
 

Suspenders/bracers over the midlayer.     

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=snow+pant+suspenders&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=27053154843&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=450808143359962583&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_8h8q1grcb8_b

 

Warning: may cause user to look like a "middleaged" NASTAR-bashing overweight "racer".    Keep coat on at all times when indoors or risk total style disappearance ;)

post #14 of 20

Best solution I've found are high waisted shell pants--not a full bib but the kind that come with suspenders. Yeah, you look like a dork with your jacket off. Who cares? OK my kids care. Too bad.

 

This sort of thing (Mountain Hardware, $350 which is pricier than I would spend and I don't like the thigh zippers, but you get the idea.)

post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

I assume you mean other than a one-piece ski suit.  I wear my very old one piece cross country nylon or whatever suit as my base layer and I would never do without it.  If I couldn't get one of those I would at least consider a once piece long underwear/shirt set.  I wouldn't ski without a one piece something somewhere, esp considering falling on a powder day.

I'm considering one piece base layer, they aren't common though and haven't seen any in stores.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Have you considered overmitts/ mitten shells?     http://raggedmountain.com/handwear

 
Suspenders/bracers over the midlayer.     

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=snow+pant+suspenders&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=27053154843&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=450808143359962583&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_8h8q1grcb8_b

Warning: may cause user to look like a "middleaged" NASTAR-bashing overweight "racer".    Keep coat on at all times when indoors or risk total style disappearance wink.gif

Actually bought a pair of overmitts at some point, but returned them since I didn't think I'll ever use them, now they are discontinued.

Don't want to buy new pants right now since I already have two pairs. I'll try suspender next, think I've seen them in local store before.
post #16 of 20

I've used the Costco warmers for a couple of years and find they do a just-OK job, especially if I wear good mitts instead of gloves. But they aren't nearly as warm or long-lasting as a brand called HotShots, which I just started using during last week's severe cold snap. I got them at Bushtukah in Ottawa, but I'm sure they'd be easy to find in Montreal.


Edited by slipshod - 2/6/15 at 9:01am
post #17 of 20

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-shed/gear-guy/What-Are-the-Best-Hand-Warmers.html

 

I happened to find the #1-ranked warmer (HotHands) at Target shortly after I read this article. They seem to work great, but I haven't skied in very cold weather since I bought them.  

 

And mittens, yes.  

post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-shed/gear-guy/What-Are-the-Best-Hand-Warmers.html

I happened to find the #1-ranked warmer (HotHands) at Target shortly after I read this article. They seem to work great, but I haven't skied in very cold weather since I bought them.  

And mittens, yes.  

Wow, quite interesting to see the same form factor heaters with such different results.
post #19 of 20

I like Grabbers, usually just use the foot warmers though.

Burn time and heat output relate to how much oxygen they consume.

 

Fluff/airy gloves or mittens and burn time will be shorter, and may not be able to keep up with heat loss

With well fit boots I usually get six or seven hours.

 

Also try not to buy them with an expiration of less than one year.

Oxygen permeates the plastic while they sit on store shelves or warehouse.

 

I usually buy a box of forty pair a few months before the season starts.

After I buy them I double wrap them them in plastic bags and squeeze out the air.

 

 

$0.02

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post
 

I like Grabbers, usually just use the foot warmers though.

Burn time and heat output relate to how much oxygen they consume.

 

Fluff/airy gloves or mittens and burn time will be shorter, and may not be able to keep up with heat loss

With well fit boots I usually get six or seven hours.

 

Also try not to buy them with an expiration of less than one year.

Oxygen permeates the plastic while they sit on store shelves or warehouse.

 

I usually buy a box of forty pair a few months before the season starts.

After I buy them I double wrap them them in plastic bags and squeeze out the air.

 

 

$0.02


Good tip on the plastic wrap. Thanks.

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