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Bone bruise at boot cuff and concerned about further injury...

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Over the weekend I had a "fun" accident, documented in this post.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/128588/2014-15-colorado-weather-discussion/1200#post_1828032

 

I was skiing along at speed, when my left ski drilled something buried under the snow hard enough to force me into this kind of a ski ballet move.

 

 

I failed at getting the ski back under me and dug the tip into the snow. It forced a really awkward release and twisting fall at about 30 mph. I got a very bad bruise at the boot cuff either at the point the ski released or possibly because I then fell on top of that foot. In any case, I came close to a boot top tib/fib, or at least a fib fracture. Thankfully Xrays were negative, but pain has kept me off that leg for most of the weekend.

 

The urgent care doctor told me I can ski on that leg with no worries once pain allows, but he also demonstrated he wasn't a skier, and wasn't terribly familiar with the whole boot cuff dynamic that creates a lot of these injuries. I wanted a second opinion as I am concerned that the bruised area, right at this pressure point, could be more prone to fracture for some time. While this injury sucks, I am really trying to keep it from being a season ender.

 

Should I be concerned about that leg being at more risk for fracture?

post #2 of 11

I'd try to see an orthopedist. I wouldn't even hazard a guess about if that bone will be more vulnerable. Good luck! Seems to have been an injury-filled weekend!

post #3 of 11

I had some horrible old Nordica Red Racers in the 70s. I was constantly nursing pretty severe briuses at the boot top that season. I did ending up breaking my leg with a boot top fracture at the end of the season (too common on that boot I later found out). New boots next year completely cured the problem and I have never since felt any threat to a boot top fracture.

 

If the issue is truly a freak tweak, don't worry too much. But consider using a different boot with better padding on the cuff until you are completely healed. 

 

Contessant is of course right, see an orthopod instead of relying on 40 years ago anecdotal stories about unsafe boots. Unless you want an excuse to get new boots chosen primarily for comfort.

 

Eric

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eleeski View Post
 

I had some horrible old Nordica Red Racers in the 70s. I was constantly nursing pretty severe briuses at the boot top that season. I did ending up breaking my leg with a boot top fracture at the end of the season (too common on that boot I later found out). New boots next year completely cured the problem and I have never since felt any threat to a boot top fracture.

 

If the issue is truly a freak tweak, don't worry too much. But consider using a different boot with better padding on the cuff until you are completely healed. 

 

Contessant is of course right, see an orthopod instead of relying on 40 years ago anecdotal stories about unsafe boots. Unless you want an excuse to get new boots chosen primarily for comfort.

 

Eric

 

This is a freak tweak. Never had issues before, and the bruising is to the fibula, not the tib. I really smacked it hard.

 

And no, I really don't want new boots as getting new boots dialed in has never been easy for me. I've been steadily replacing soles, footbeds, liners, etc. as they wear out to avoid changing the shell (2008 vintage with a lot of ski days).

 

I can't feel the specific part of the bruise under the muscle, but when I've had other good bone bruises, I associate the injury with a kinda queasy, spongy feeling to the affected bone. I don't know if that is perception or reality. The doctor seemed to not be concerned- his advice was once the pain was in check everything was good to go. I'm just trying to feel out if my concern is warranted or not.

post #5 of 11

Wait till the snow gets good. In California that might be plenty of time to completely heal (and injure something else waterskiing or biking...).

 

Still, new equipment is fun. New boots are likely to have a different pressure point. 2008? Maybe it is time. 

 

Speedy recovery.

 

Eric

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eleeski View Post
 

Wait till the snow gets good. In California that might be plenty of time to completely heal (and injure something else waterskiing or biking...).

 

Still, new equipment is fun. New boots are likely to have a different pressure point. 2008? Maybe it is time. 

 

Speedy recovery.

 

Eric

 

So, this is advice to wait for no pain?

 

I'm reading other folks- it seems like healing can take any where from a week to ten days to a few months. So far, it seems to be healing well- I am off pain meds and can hobble around reasonably well without real pain. I am hoping that means sooner rather than later, but I don't want to push things.

 

I'm not ready to give up on the boots until something forces me to (broken buckle, shell tear), and I have no reason to think this injury is directly related to the boot. I've never had shin bang in these boots or really any other fit problem once they were properly punched. I think I would have more chance of making things worse by swapping boots this season to something that would need several rounds of modifications to fit comfortably.

post #7 of 11

I'm not a doctor so I won't offer advice. I'm not a weatherman either so don't wait for my snow forecast.

 

I do like shiny new equipment. That's the only reason I'm advising you to get new boots. Full Tilt with molded Intuitions were pretty easy for my weird feet - just sayin. 

 

Skiing should be fun and feel good. From an enjoyment perspective, waiting sounds reasonable. Unless you are getting paid to ski. Then you need to negotiate with your employer. Still, try to keep it pleasurable.

 

Good luck

 

Eric

post #8 of 11
I asked my ortho.

A bruised bone is actually a bruise to the membrane around the bone called the periosteum. If the X-Ray doesn't show anything, the bone itself is structurally sound.

The real danger is banging it while skiing and the pain making you do something stupid and getting hurt.

He also said you'll know when you can ski on it.
post #9 of 11

When I sprained my knee five or so years ago (mcl acl tibial plateau hairline fracture and bone bruise) the ortho (knee specialist who counts US ski team members among his clients) told me that the bone bruise was the most painful of my injuries and that bone bruises can take as long to heal as fractures. Don't want to rain on your parade my friend, but be prepared to have it last a while. I don't think you will damage it, but more pounding could make it hurt longer.

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom View Post
 

When I sprained my knee five or so years ago (mcl acl tibial plateau hairline fracture and bone bruise) the ortho (knee specialist who counts US ski team members among his clients) told me that the bone bruise was the most painful of my injuries and that bone bruises can take as long to heal as fractures. Don't want to rain on your parade my friend, but be prepared to have it last a while. I don't think you will damage it, but more pounding could make it hurt longer.

 

I am cautiously optimistic. Pain is down every day, and I am getting around pretty decently at this moment. I figure I am going to stick it into a boot Friday night, flex it, and decide whether this weekend is go or no go, and I think it will be about a coin toss at that point.

 

Luckily the bruising is in the Fib area, not the weight-bearing Tibula.  I think I really dodged a bullet.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post

I asked my ortho.

A bruised bone is actually a bruise to the membrane around the bone called the periosteum. If the X-Ray doesn't show anything, the bone itself is structurally sound.

The real danger is banging it while skiing and the pain making you do something stupid and getting hurt.

He also said you'll know when you can ski on it.


Thanks.  This is consistent with what my doc told me, and seems to fit with what I can find- the biggest issue is pain and possibly prolonging pain, but not a real increase in risk of further injury.

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