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Ski recommendation for intermediate lightweight skier

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

I'm getting back into skiing after a long break, and was wondering what would be ideal for someone of my size. I see lots of recs for heavier guys, but not many for lightweights - 

 

Where in the world are you skiing? 

-USA, west coast(though might move to east coast)

 

What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)

-Right now, groomed, though the local mountain(Mt. Hood), can get very cruddy at times with many inches of frozen/thawed snow on the runs at times. I want to eventually venture into moguls & ungroomed runs, but if I need different skis for those, I can pick them up later.

 

How many days a year do you ski?

-Judging from my current rate, 10-12

 

How advanced are you as a skier?

-Intermediate - Groomed Blue Squares are enjoyable in good conditions, with lots of crud on them, less so, but still manageable. I can do parallel turns & link turns, but I do take the steep parts slower.

 

What's your height and weight? 

5 ft. 8 in. 120 lbs, this weight won't be changing anytime soon, based on my history

 

Price isn't an issue, but I really don't need the absolute best to learn. If I can pick up a used pair of decent skis, I am ok with that.

 

Also how important are the bindings? Does performance/safety increase with increasing cost?

 

I've been recommended by a friend to look at Volkl Mantras, and by a shop to look at Volkl Kendo 163's, would those be a good option for me? I worry that at my level & weight, they might be too stiff for me.

 

Edit: I've been using only rental skis & boots until now, but just bought a lange RX100 boot today. Haven't tested it out/had it molded yet.

 

Thanks!

--Varun


Edited by Varun916 - 1/31/15 at 10:22pm
post #2 of 18

Hello Varun I read where you said you had some new Langes and haven't heated them.In the ask a bootfitter column the fitters were saying liners like the langes will come away looser after the molding and you might not be able to get it back.I'm getting new boots in the mail this week and was prepared to heat them but now I'm not;what they said makes alot of sense to me now.Good luck.

post #3 of 18
I would have a look at the Fischer Motive 80, or the Fischer Ranger 88 TI. Both great all round/ all snow skis that are stable yet forgiving. A great learning platform. The Motive is more intermediate and front side oriented, the Ranger is a bit more advanced and will support your development for a bit longer.
post #4 of 18
"I've been recommended by a friend to look at Volkl Mantras, and by a shop to look at Volkl Kendo 163's, would those be a good option for me? I worry that at my level & weight, they might be too stiff for me."

Legitimate concern. I like cheizz's general direction better. A big guy with modest skills may profit from a high performance ski out of the gate because he'll be able to bend it via sheer mass. Someone your size not so much. Suggest sticking to middle shelf models. Blizzard Bushwacker in a 166cm comes to mind.
post #5 of 18

Welcome Varun.

 

You are very light, I would suggest listening to Qcanoe for ideas and I agree the Mantra and the Kendo are not really the best options for your size. Cheizz mentioned the two Rangers and they are a viable option too, they are on the lighter side and a bit more compliant in flex, both good things for you light weight. The Scott The Ski at 89ish underfoot would be another suggestion but like mentioned before, stay between 80-90 in that mid section. Head's Rev series offers three great options at 80/85/90 underfoot. 

 

As far as bindings, you asked "Also how important are the bindings? Does performance/safety increase with increasing cost?" Binding are the interface between the boot and the ski, think about it like tires on your car, they connect you to the road and are the most important active safety aspect of your car. When spending more for a binding you are not so much buying a bigger spring (higher DIN) but a better housing. For you and your size there is diminishing returns so you don't have to spend a ton. Most any $199-249$ binding will be fine, avoid most of the $159-179$ models.  Top choices..Rossi PX3/Look SPX, Head Attack 13, Salomon Sth2 13 and Rossi FKS/Look Pivot12. 

 

Oh and maybe consider eating a sandwich from time to time, put some meat on those bones. 

post #6 of 18
Rosignol Experience 80 or 84

If you want more of a carver ski that still can handle some ungromed stuff, Volkl RTM 80 (RTM 77 will work if just skiing recreational-no serious speed, the Rossi E80 has same issue)
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the advice! I really appreciate the help. I'm going to do some research on all of the skis mentioned & report back on how it turns out.

 

Should I be looking at a 163 cm given my height? 163's come up to my chin, which the shop said was perfect for my size. Also, if a particular ski comes in different sizes(say 159 & 167 but not 163), should I be leaning to the longer or the shorter ski?

 

@viking9: Thanks for the heads up on the molding. It seems like the universal advice is to get it fitted, but I'll look into this more before doing anything permanent. 

 

@Philpug: Trust me I eat quite a bit! Something about my body structure seems to prevent me from going over 130, no matter how much I muscle build/eat!

post #8 of 18

Wow, do NOT consider the Kendo or Mantra at your skill level and size, it's not that they aren't good skis, its that they are going to be way too stiff and hard to work for you.

post #9 of 18
I'm 5'8" 150 on a "heavy" day west coast Mammoth or Big Bear 10-15 days a year skier. I really like Blizzard Bushwacker. It's an 88 waisted do "anything good but probably not great at anything" ski. It's very light and easy to ski. My legs don't get tired until after 6 hours.

You might try the 159 or the 166
post #10 of 18
I forgot to add. I ski them in 173
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice!

 

I'm leaning to the bushwacker right now, as I see some great deals used on ebay. I had a question about demo bindings though. I understand that demo bindings are generally considered not great, but I'd imagine it'd vary from company to company? One of the skis I saw comes with a Rossignol Axium 100 Demo binding. Should I just stay away from demo bindings, or would this be ok?

 

--Varun 

post #12 of 18
I'm no expert on bindings but mine came with marker Griffin. They're also light.

You might swing a good deal from an online site too. They're not the "hottest" selling skis around. Ask around and you might get a deal with skis and bindings...
post #13 of 18

+1 on the Bushwacker, you should be able to ski the whole mountain with it.  Mt Hood is not really the best place for a narrow carver.  The wet snow is tough to groom.

post #14 of 18
PNW skiers don't need no stinking groomers. ;-)
post #15 of 18

What shop are you dealing with?

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

@ecimmortal - The shop I got my boots from that recommended the kendos was Mt Hood Meadows' shop.

 

I called US outdoor & the Mountain Shop in portland, and when I told them my skill level & weight, both immediately recommended the Rossignol Smash 7. It seems like there haven't been many reviews on them, does anyone have any exp with these? The price point is certainly attractive.

 

I did find a pair of used bushwackers online, but they have demo axium 100 bindings that I'm too thrilled about. New with bindings is a bit more than I'd like to spend.

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Varun916 View Post
 

@ecimmortal - The shop I got my boots from that recommended the kendos was Mt Hood Meadows' shop.

 

I called US outdoor & the Mountain Shop in portland, and when I told them my skill level & weight, both immediately recommended the Rossignol Smash 7. It seems like there haven't been many reviews on them, does anyone have any exp with these? The price point is certainly attractive.

 

I did find a pair of used bushwackers online, but they have demo axium 100 bindings that I'm too thrilled about. New with bindings is a bit more than I'd like to spend.


For what you are looking for you might want to give Hillcrest a call as well.

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

Cool thanks, I'll check them out as well.

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