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Why do I have so much trouble with crud and any deeper than an inch of powder? - Page 3

post #61 of 88

Edging and falls on the new shaped skis  s frustrating  at the least and the fastest way may be to take a refresher lesson the next morning you go on slope.   My best guess is you are too heavy on the edges and need to feel them engage sooner.  Another point is you mention pressure on the tips which was required on old style  GS skis but the modern shaped skis need to be skied the full length with good feel for the whole ski not just the edges.    Try balance equally on your big toe, little toe and heel while skiing a comfortable  or learning slope.  Good luck and keep trying.

post #62 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

C'mon, tball. Seriously? What was the crappy part? The first ten seconds?

Come out here. We can show you crappy. Except right now we can't because of all the fresh blower. Oh well.
 

1. Yep, the shots with smooth snow were pretty nice.   

 

2. Much of the snow was a lot worse than it looks.   You know when you drop into something thinking you are getting one kind of snow... then in the first turn you realize it's much worse.   It was like that.

 

3. Most of Tucker faces N, but those runs face E and NE.   Prior to the four day old 5 inches on top there was no snow and record warmth up to 50's (!) for a week.   The snow underneath was fully baked.   Do you have sun back east?  :)

 

4. Now apply the kinetic energy of bombs and avalanches.  I'm pretty sure you don't see those back east. :)   Needless to say, they wreak havoc on snow conditions.    They can't do bootpacking on Tucker (no lift, but soon), so they have to blast and cut it to smithereens to make it safe.  That's what they did that entire week it didn't snow to get it open for the year.  Add 5 inches on top and it looks nice, but doesn't ski so nice.

 

You asked, so here's another example of crappy part (with a nice bomb hole) from about 2:20:

 

 

Watch in the video how I'm getting bounced around as I ski that section until I finally find some smooth snow on the right toward the bottom.   The only soft snow is the 5 inches on top.  What's below is mostly garbage. 

 

I think you are actually making my point for the OP.  :D  My 110mm Sickles are pretty much ideal for those conditions, and make that snow look easy to ski.  I really believe all but the very best skiers would be eaten alive by that snow on the OP's GS cheater skis, including myself.

post #63 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

1. Yep, the shots with smooth snow were pretty nice.  

 

2. Much of the snow was a lot worse than it looks.   You know when you drop into something thinking you are getting one kind of snow... then in the first turn you realize it's much worse.   It was like that.

 

3. Most of Tucker faces N, but those runs face E and NE.   Prior to the four day old 5 inches on top there was no snow and record warmth up to 50's (!) for a week.   The snow underneath was fully baked.   Do you have sun back east?  :)

 

4. Now apply the kinetic energy of bombs and avalanches.  I'm pretty sure you don't see those back east. :)   Needless to say, they wreak havoc on snow conditions.    They can't do bootpacking on Tucker (no lift, but soon), so they have to blast and cut it to smithereens to make it safe.  That's what they did that entire week it didn't snow to get it open for the year.  Add 5 inches on top and it looks nice, but doesn't ski so nice.

 

You asked, so here's another example of crappy part (with a nice bomb hole) from about 2:20:

 

 

Watch in the video how I'm getting bounced around as I ski that section until I finally find some smooth snow on the right toward the bottom.   The only soft snow is the 5 inches on top.  What's below is mostly garbage.

 

I think you are actually making my point for the OP.  :D  My 110mm Sickles are pretty much ideal for those conditions, and make that snow look easy to ski.  I really believe all but the very best skiers would be eaten alive by that snow on the OP's GS cheater skis, including myself.

Gooey crud can be fun if one is strong enough to make GS or bigger turns.  Otherwise with the wrong skis, smearing a short slow turn is well nigh impossible.

post #64 of 88

IMHO any thread on skiing crud should by law include these two vids...

 

Bob Barnes' Crudology

 

 

 

And the smoothest old school skier on old school skis handling powdery crud most masterfully...

 

 

Check the footage starting at 3:47 - poetry in motion!  ;-)

post #65 of 88
There's so much 'modern' in JC's skiing, it's scary. Beautiful!
post #66 of 88
Most recent Ski Magazine says you need to "slice" crud and not smear. I seem to do much better just blasting it as fast as I can making high speed smears and GS turns so what they are saying is counter to my experience. Anyone have any thoughts on that?
post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

There's so much 'modern' in JC's skiing, it's scary. Beautiful!

Yes, it's beautiful skiing. But I'm not seeing the amount of modern skiing that you are. I owned this video back in the day and JCK's skiing was compared and contrasted with a PSIA demo team member on the same video (can't remember who it was... anyone remember this one?). I'm thinking the video was possible in the mid-late 80's. I'll have to check the archives to see if I even still have it.

I hadn't seen Bob's "Crudology" vid until now, but I thought it was great from a lot of different angles.
post #68 of 88
Of course its not identically modern... i figured what i mentioned would be taken as such. What I'm seeing a core elements of modern skiing that are being compensated for because of his gear is all. Round turn shape, even application of pressure, separation through the arc, disciplined but not static upper body, engagement of the ski above the fall line, no 'braking'... I'm sure if we were on similar gear, we'd feel fortunate to ski with his skills. I'm also thinking about the Grenoble video that's on youtube... Availment in particular. If this JC in 1980 jumped Ina time machine and dropped in for a private on modern gear, how long do you figure it'd take him to make the complete transistion to 'new skiing'? I'd bet very little. He had none of the vestiges of lesser skiing from that period a la upper body rotation to start the turn, the abstem, etc...
post #69 of 88

Of course it is all about exploiting what you have.  I remember several years back having the opportunity to ski with Stein Eriksen .  I was with a bunch of instructors on vacation and were skiing on the first or second generation of shaped skis (don't remember if I was on Salomons or Volkl bumble bees at the time).  I don't think I paid any attention to his skis (as if it mattered). Stylistically he looked very different even by then current standards... but man could he ski. 

post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

Most recent Ski Magazine says you need to "slice" crud and not smear. I seem to do much better just blasting it as fast as I can making high speed smears and GS turns so what they are saying is counter to my experience. Anyone have any thoughts on that?
I think you can probably ski any way you want in or on crud if you apply enough force, maybe better on a ski that's amenable to floating over instead of through it. But you'll still have to deal with crud at lower speeds, and won't have much fun if you aren't able to pull off a non-smeared turn.

I haven't tried floating or smearing because I dig slicing and dicing so much. Part of the pleasure is from being able to enjoy conditions that tormented me for my first four years in skis; another part is that my skis love crud and make me feel like I'm riding a powerful horse that senses exactly what I want to do next.

Of course I still suck, and I still get off balance when I stiffen up and stop absorbing the irregularities. But oh my goodness, how great it feels when things come together!
post #71 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

Most recent Ski Magazine says you need to "slice" crud and not smear. I seem to do much better just blasting it as fast as I can making high speed smears and GS turns so what they are saying is counter to my experience. Anyone have any thoughts on that?

Keep in mind that SKImag "lessons" are extremely cursory, and are aimed at a fairly low level of skier. SKI's target audience is the one vacation a season skier. To those guys, smearing is throwing your skis sideways and jamming on your edges. So while in reality a good powder turn is usually steered and somewhat smeared, to Joe Schmoe SKImag, that is a move that amounts to an arced carve.
post #72 of 88
Thread Starter 

Alright, I went skiing with my oldest son this past Saturday and we both took private lessons.

 

Some things I learned and Instructor Comments:  Instructor was 20 years my senior and obviously transitioned from old school to new, I also had the benefit of my sons instructor as we worked the same trail.

 

The Good: (on occation)

1.  Overall, I ski well (which was good to hear cause I started doubting myself)

2.  I transition from edge to edge well

3. I didn't have that far to go to start carving what he considered acceptable turns for a newbie to shaped skis.

 

The Bad (according to him)

1. I do have a bit of a tail wash

2. I sometimes get lazy and leave my hands back to far causing me to get off balance

3. Get wider, wider, wider

4. Stay over the skis

5. I sometimes pressure the tips too much causing the ski to react too much and catch an edge.

 

We worked on a wide blue that had good groomed middle and deeper crud on the edges to work in both conditions.  I practiced slicing through the crud and when doing so he said it was okay to get narrower than he wished I would on the groomed portions.

 

One thing I wish I had asked was for him to give more instruction on proper stance and balance throught the turns, so I'd have a starting point rather than working from my current stance.

 

Some things I'm going to have a hard time getting used to.......

 

1. Wide - it feels un-natural.  I will try, but this may be where I draw the line and just make sure I get better at the overall skiing.

2. Getting used to the ski doing more of the work and not forcing them or over pressuring them.

 

Anyway, that's it so far, did not have time to film anything, will leave that when my wife is with us.

post #73 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfboiler View Post
 

Alright, I went skiing with my oldest son this past Saturday and we both took private lessons.

 

Some things I learned and Instructor Comments:  Instructor was 20 years my senior and obviously transitioned from old school to new, I also had the benefit of my sons instructor as we worked the same trail.

 

The Good: (on occation)

1.  Overall, I ski well (which was good to hear cause I started doubting myself)

2.  I transition from edge to edge well

3. I didn't have that far to go to start carving what he considered acceptable turns for a newbie to shaped skis.

 

The Bad (according to him)

1. I do have a bit of a tail wash

2. I sometimes get lazy and leave my hands back to far causing me to get off balance

3. Get wider, wider, wider

4. Stay over the skis

5. I sometimes pressure the tips too much causing the ski to react too much and catch an edge.

 

We worked on a wide blue that had good groomed middle and deeper crud on the edges to work in both conditions.  I practiced slicing through the crud and when doing so he said it was okay to get narrower than he wished I would on the groomed portions.

 

One thing I wish I had asked was for him to give more instruction on proper stance and balance throught the turns, so I'd have a starting point rather than working from my current stance.

 

Some things I'm going to have a hard time getting used to.......

 

1. Wide - it feels un-natural.  I will try, but this may be where I draw the line and just make sure I get better at the overall skiing.

2. Getting used to the ski doing more of the work and not forcing them or over pressuring them.

 

Anyway, that's it so far, did not have time to film anything, will leave that when my wife is with us.


Sounds good, df.  Lots of positives in your first list.  I have some questions, if you are interested in continuing the conversation.

 

1.  You say you benefitted from your son's lesson that went on alongside yours.  What did you learn from your son's experience?

2.  Did your instructor explain why or how shaped skis work better with a wider stance?    

3.  Did you understand him to want you to have more "weight" on the inside ski with that wider stance, or not?

4.  He said you didn't have that much to change to make "acceptable turns for a newbie on shaped skis."  What exactly are you trying to do that's different, now that the lesson is over, to make those turns happen? 

5.  And most important, when you are working on doing those new things, are you sometimes feeling your skis behave better?


Edited by LiquidFeet - 2/10/15 at 8:56am
post #74 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


Sounds good, df.  Lots of positives in your first list.  I have some questions, if you are interested in continuing the conversation.

 

1.  You say you benefitted from your son's lesson that went on alongside yours.  What did you learn from your son's experience?

2.  Did your instructor explain why or how shaped skis work better with a wider stance?

3.  Did you understand him to want you to have more "weight" on the inside ski with that wider stance, or not?

4.  He said you didn't have that much to change to make "acceptable turns for a newbie on shaped skis."  What exactly are you trying to do that's different, now that the lesson is over, to make those turns happen?

5.  And most important, when you are working on doing those new things, are you sometimes feeling your skis behave better?

First, Thanks.  As to your questions:

 

1. I benefitted by the fact that the two instructors worked together to help both my son and I, so I got two different perspectives and suggestions from both

 

2. No they did not, but I found the wider I was the more opportunity for the two skis to have minds of their own and not work in unison, it was harder for me to keep them evenly pressured

 

3. He did not say, like I said it was more, do as I show, not too much explaining what was going on ---- it was only an hour lesson, which they did exceed.  (ps.  when my instructor didn't think I was watching and he was just skiing, he had a lot of step to his skiing, to bring the skis more together as they got to the fall line, just thought that was interesting)

 

4. I suppose I am going to try to make sure I get more on edge, evenly across both skis,,,but truthfully I want to do that in short carved turns, not the big sweeping turns we were doing (which I understand were done to help learn the movements)   I don't have much use for the big sweeping GS type turns right now.

 

5. Yes, they do behave better, still do have that issue of getting both skis working in unison, especially if one hits different conditions than the other.

 

I will be applying the things I learned this coming weekend.  I will be studying lots of video, especially any that describe technique... Any suggestions on good ones?  I am a big technique person especially in setup, with the belief you then work to make that technique look and perform more like art.

post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfboiler View Post
 

 

One thing I wish I had asked was for him to give more instruction on proper stance and balance throught the turns, so I'd have a starting point rather than working from my current stance.

 

 

I recommend you try the 1000 step drill.  While skiing and turning just shuffle your feet up and down, stepping from one foot to the other.  As you alternate which foot is holding you up and which ski is in the air, concentrate on feeling even weight distribution on the bottom of your feet, from ball to heel.

post #76 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I recommend you try the 1000 step drill.  While skiing and turning just shuffle your feet up and down, stepping from one foot to the other.  As you alternate which foot is holding you up and which ski is in the air, concentrate on feeling even weight distribution on the bottom of your feet, from ball to heel.

Ghost, thank you. I think that will be interesting for me to try, I am definitely outside ski dominant in turns. I think this drill will help give me confidence in trusting my inside edge. I'm sure it may take a bit to master though through the turn. But I like the concept of stepping before I try drills like the one foot drill all the way through the turn, etc.
post #77 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfboiler View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I recommend you try the 1000 step drill.  While skiing and turning just shuffle your feet up and down, stepping from one foot to the other.  As you alternate which foot is holding you up and which ski is in the air, concentrate on feeling even weight distribution on the bottom of your feet, from ball to heel.

Ghost, thank you. I think that will be interesting for me to try, I am definitely outside ski dominant in turns. I think this drill will help give me confidence in trusting my inside edge. I'm sure it may take a bit to master though through the turn. But I like the concept of stepping before I try drills like the one foot drill all the way through the turn, etc.


It's not so much of an inside foot drill as a balance drill.  Try to feel yourself being balanced fore and aft as you do it on each foot.  Outside ski dominance is fine for hard turns on hardpack, for soft and deep, not so much, and for everything in between...well you get the picture.  I let my outside ski dominate, but my inside ski is anything but submissive.

post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfboiler View Post
 

Some things I'm going to have a hard time getting used to.......

 

1. Wide - it feels un-natural.  I will try, but this may be where I draw the line and just make sure I get better at the overall skiing.

2. Getting used to the ski doing more of the work and not forcing them or over pressuring them.

 

I hope you can abandon this line of thinking. You might not get enough better at overall skiing if you don't embrace these "new" ideas.

 

Remember, this SHOULD feel un-natural. It is completely new to you. It won't be easy to unlearn and it will creep into your skiing for a long time, if not forever. It feels unnatural because it is new. It will start feeling good as you get used to it. You will soon wonder why it was hard to learn to do it.

 

BTW...did he tell you how wide wide is?

post #79 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post

I hope you can abandon this line of thinking. You might not get enough better at overall skiing if you don't embrace these "new" ideas.

Remember, this SHOULD feel un-natural. It is completely new to you. It won't be easy to unlearn and it will creep into your skiing for a long time, if not forever. It feels unnatural because it is new. It will start feeling good as you get used to it. You will soon wonder why it was hard to learn to do it.

BTW...did he tell you how wide wide is?

I found this video when looking for the 1000 step drill ghost mentioned, this guy skis about as wide as I feel comfortable, the instructor would have considered this way too narrow, I think this width of stance looks far better than what I see others think is proper. Paticularly toward the end of the video around 2 minutes in when he shows in slow mo.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpl3KeUi7wA&feature=youtube_gdata_player
post #80 of 88

Don't worry too much about the distance between feet.  Groomers where you REALLY lean over ala Ligety do reward a wider stance.  Off piste tight areas reward a narrower more nimble stance.  I find my feet tend to separate a bit when I do my own best Ligety impersonation.

 

PS, I like Josh's take on things, he has a nice way of putting it, easy to remember and visualize.

post #81 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

Don't worry too much about the distance between feet.  Groomers where you REALLY lean over ala Ligety do reward a wider stance.  Off piste tight areas reward a narrower more nimble stance.  I find my feet tend to separate a bit when I do my own best Ligety impersonation.

 

PS, I like Josh's take on things, he has a nice way of putting it, easy to remember and visualize.

Do your feet separate  or do your legs and feet separate?  YM

post #82 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

Do your feet separate  or do your legs and feet separate?  YM

I believe my knees spread a bit, don't want to get A framed.

 

This slight spread lends itself to a more Austrian lower leg.  If working the tips I like the 11:00 and 1:00 boot pressure.  Simultaneous to each leg, both skis work together and I feel a bit like the Herminator with my parallel shins, boot alignment helps a lot here.

post #83 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfboiler View Post
 

I've heard so much about the new ski radius practically turning the ski, and I admit I am not used to that, nor did I want that in a ski..  Now that being said, these skis at about an 18M turn radius, I don't find they turn without some decent help, nor as easily as people make out about some of their fat tipped skis,,,,  the basic pick it up and put it down so no I don't ski without removing the ski from the snow in normal skiing, unless I'm really working the knees and hips in an old school skis together manner.  I have practiced tipping to see how the skis react and truly they don't that much, maybe I'm not pressuring the tips enough, but again this is pretty foreign to me.

 

To me, this paragraph makes it pretty clear that you are not carving in a modern sense. Carving on modern shaped skis happens from tipping the ski, with the turn shape being altered by more or less forward pressure to bend the ski.

 

"Helping" the turn in a way that doesn't involve tipping would mean you are rotating the ski around.

 

This is exactly the type of movement that will give the problems the instant snow gets deep enough to start catching the ski.  When you rotate a ski, you are moving the ski tip out of the direction of movement of the ski. On hard snow, the tip doesn't meet any resistance in doing so, and you get away with it.

 

On deeper snow, the tip and edge of the ski get grabbed in unpredictable ways, and you have control problems with the ski. Work to eliminate rotation from your turns, and you can ski deeper snow and crud.

post #84 of 88

1-2 times a year, I ski some straight skis for a few hours as something to keep me occupied when the storms don't come.

 

This year that day was a few weeks ago. The two skis I brought to the mountain were a paid of 1984 Dynastar Course SL's (gold chicken hearts), and a pair of Volant T3 Power carving skis (74 waist).

 

I skied the Dynastars for several hours and had a great time. I can get very aggressive with them because they are damp and the edge hold is amazing. This particular pair appears to have a race tune rather than a rec tune back in the day where the edge at the tip and tail is dulled.  The biggest problem I have skiing them is I have to avoid tipping them too early, as it takes very little edge angle to auger the ski into a 90m radius turn.  Because I can't pretend that I can actually railroad track straight skis, I had to get used to unweight to get the tip disengaged, hit the boot cuffs hard to flex the ski somewhat, cheat a little rotation in to point the ski into the turn, then engage the edge and finish the arc with the edge solidly set.

 

After several hours of this, I went back to shaped skis and couldn't find my edges. I was washing out turns on soft groom like it was bolierplate.

 

Problem was, I spent half the day getting in the habit of getting weight off the tip at the beginning of a turn, right when the tips needed to be dug in. Even recognizing the problem, it took me most of the day to get dialed back in. 

post #85 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

1-2 times a year, I ski some straight skis for a few hours as something to keep me occupied when the storms don't come.

This year that day was a few weeks ago. The two skis I brought to the mountain were a paid of 1984 Dynastar Course SL's (gold chicken hearts), and a pair of Volant T3 Power carving skis (74 waist).

I skied the Dynastars for several hours and had a great time. I can get very aggressive with them because they are damp and the edge hold is amazing. This particular pair appears to have a race tune rather than a rec tune back in the day where the edge at the tip and tail is dulled.  The biggest problem I have skiing them is I have to avoid tipping them too early, as it takes very little edge angle to auger the ski into a 90m radius turn.  Because I can't pretend that I can actually railroad track straight skis, I had to get used to unweight to get the tip disengaged, hit the boot cuffs hard to flex the ski somewhat, cheat a little rotation in to point the ski into the turn, then engage the edge and finish the arc with the edge solidly set.

After several hours of this, I went back to shaped skis and couldn't find my edges. I was washing out turns on soft groom like it was bolierplate.

Problem was, I spent half the day getting in the habit of getting weight off the tip at the beginning of a turn, right when the tips needed to be dug in. Even recognizing the problem, it took me most of the day to get dialed back in. 

roflmao.gif

That works in the direct opposite too.

A couple of years ago I have developed a bad habit from where I didn't take lessons when I came back to skiing. One of the head instructors told me to "Try this" and work on nothing but for the next couple of days.

I was so frustrated I was ready to quit. When the 2 days were up, I went back and told him it wasn't working no matter what I did, and in fact it was making my skiing worse.

He said "I told you that? I must have meant the exact opposite! Now try that for a couple of days."

And that's how he broke my bad habit.
post #86 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post


roflmao.gif

That works in the direct opposite too.

A couple of years ago I have developed a bad habit from where I didn't take lessons when I came back to skiing. One of the head instructors told me to "Try this" and work on nothing but for the next couple of days.

I was so frustrated I was ready to quit. When the 2 days were up, I went back and told him it wasn't working no matter what I did, and in fact it was making my skiing worse.

He said "I told you that? I must have meant the exact opposite! Now try that for a couple of days."

And that's how he broke my bad habit.

 

Exactly!

 

It took skiing straight skis and shaped skis head to head to see exactly how much of a problem tailgunning is. Even being just a little bit back made a huge difference.

 

When I first changed from straights to shaped roughly 15 years ago, I still skied ankles together, big unweight and tail wag to start, and didn't see what the problem was. I guess you get used to not having any edges...

post #87 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

To me, this paragraph makes it pretty clear that you are not carving in a modern sense. Carving on modern shaped skis happens from tipping the ski, with the turn shape being altered by more or less forward pressure to bend the ski.

"Helping" the turn in a way that doesn't involve tipping would mean you are rotating the ski around.

This is exactly the type of movement that will give the problems the instant snow gets deep enough to start catching the ski.  When you rotate a ski, you are moving the ski tip out of the direction of movement of the ski. On hard snow, the tip doesn't meet any resistance in doing so, and you get away with it.

On deeper snow, the tip and edge of the ski get grabbed in unpredictable ways, and you have control problems with the ski. Work to eliminate rotation from your turns, and you can ski deeper snow and crud.
a

Here is the rub, I never had these problems when I was younger and skiing all the time, on piste off piste, whereever, I just think I forgot how to ski in it, now you add the changes in equipment and an entire overhaul of technique, my bad knees and overall poor strength, etc. That quote is about an entirely different style of skiing, and not any attempt at carving a turn.

Now, part of the issue I am beginning to feel is that people are tending to speak about skiing in absolutes, you either carve or you rotate/skid, I am not so sure this is so cut and dry especially when you talk about just skiing. I watched a lot of the women's slalom this past weekend and I saw a lot of both, I also saw the poster boy for carving TL not being able to handle the short SL course like he does the gs.
I think my issue right now is just about adapting, getting on edge regardless of style or type of sking I'm doing. Stepping quick turns is fun but will have to be left to hard pack days.The lift and step or unweighting does not always lead to a skid, nor does it always mean the entire ski is lifted, often it's mostly tail. It is really just what became replaced with the ankle roll.
Edited by dfboiler - 2/17/15 at 4:55pm
post #88 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfboiler View Post

Now, part of the issue I am beginning to feel is that people are tending to speak about skiing in absolutes, you either carve or you rotate/skid, I am not so sure this is so cut and dry especially when you talk about just skiing. I watched a lot of the women's slalom this past weekend and I saw a lot of both, I also saw the poster boy for carving TL not being able to handle the short SL course like he does the gs.
The vast majority of skiing is about blending edging skills and rotary skills. What people are saying is that skidding doesn't work in 3D snow, and at some point stepping won't either; you need to use the edge of the ski in 3D snow, more subtly in deep powder, more definitely in crud.
Quote:
I think my issue right now is just about adapting, getting on edge regardless of style or type of sking I'm doing. Stepping quick turns is fun but will have to be left to hard pack days.
So, what about lessons? I forget, did you rule that out? Honestly, a few hours with an instructor will solve your problems without having to go through stages of learning and then having to unlearn the most effective (and fun!) use of your new sticks.
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