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DIN setting help

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi There!
im looking to buy some new bindings. The Rossignol FKS 18.
The DIN range is 8-18 and when i use the Dinsetting.com and put myself at lvl 3 skier i get an 8 and if i put myself at 3+ i get a 9,5.
IM doing freestyle skiing and im not pro, but im getting pretty good, and doing medium size jumps, a lot of rails and so. 

My question is what DIN should i use, and how close to the lower end of the binding (8) should it be?
Thanks.

post #2 of 13

I do my own work on my skis and bikes, but I leave binding mounts and DIN tests to the local ski shops. The $40 for a mount + test (less for a test alone) is well worth knowing that my bindings will release at the right time, rather than setting it myself and spending my skiing time worrying about whether my skis will pop off when they're supposed to.

post #3 of 13
This is one of those questions, if you have to ask don't don't.

Do you pop skis at 8? If not stick with 8. I fall into the same category and have found that for me that 8 is just not enough, so I run at 9. As you get better you will find that your settings are more based on experience than what is recommended by DIN. Things that factor into that are is the release safe to have or is better not to lose the ski and risk injury. Which is the less of two evils?

BTW you only have to post the question once.

iPhone typo edit
Edited by oldschoolskier - 1/29/15 at 4:25am
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo191 View Post

Hi There!
im looking to buy some new bindings. The Rossignol FKS 18.
The DIN range is 8-18 and when i use the Dinsetting.com and put myself at lvl 3 skier i get an 8 and if i put myself at 3+ i get a 9,5.
IM doing freestyle skiing and im not pro, but im getting pretty good, and doing medium size jumps, a lot of rails and so. 

My question is what DIN should i use, and how close to the lower end of the binding (8) should it be?
Thanks.

I don't know how skiing freestyle impacts your setting. I know that racers tend to go higher than the recommendation. Not sure what freestylers should do. Usually it is a matter of weighing the risk of the ski staying on a little longer so you can regain your balance/recover or coming off right away so you don't injure you leg. Which is more dangerous; it staying on or coming off? Quite the conundrum.

I would say that this is the advantage of buying bindings from a shop as they usually mount them for you and will set them for you at not extra cost. At least the places around here do.

What are your current bindings set at?

Is there a need to vary from that (like pre-releasing)?

Why are you changing the bindings?

If your getting new ones because you found a good deal or you just want them, as long as your current setting isn't causing you issues, you might want to just stick with it. If you have changed your input data (different boot sole length, weight, height etc) since your current bindings were last set, you should probably change accordingly.

Ken
post #5 of 13

  

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Im buying new skies and bindings - my last skis was on 10 which were fine, now im riding some old ones i got for free they are on 8 and i keep popping out... 
But i was more the question about if it matters that they are only 8-9-10 if the lowest setting is 8?

post #7 of 13

It's in the range so it should be fine.  

However, this is why you get your bindings tested, because you're right that the numbers at the edges may have more error than the numbers in the middle.

post #8 of 13

Not really ideal, skiing an 8-18 bindng on 8. Can ya do i? Sure! 

 

Find a 4-12 so 8 is in the middle of the range. In fact you can still better ski a 4-12 on 9.5 than and 8-18 on 8

post #9 of 13

Since you are buying new, get a set where your setting is towards the middle of the range.  One that runs from 6 to 12 or so would be ideal.

post #10 of 13

I have to disagree that only a shop should set DIN. A shop will set by the chart, period. Various factors can require a skier to use a different DIN--weight or BSL near the edge of the range for example, style of skiing, experience with prereleases and non releases. So an experienced skier will frequently set his or her bindings to a value other than what the chart says. That said, if you have to ask take 'em to a shop. I guarantee that the shop is a better option than anonymous strangers on the internet. Should all new bindings be release tested?--my tech says he's never found a new Rossi (Look) or Solly that tested out of spec. Occasionally a Marker tests out of spec.  FWIW YMMV etc etc.  And of course boot factors can make a difference. So do as I say, not as I do, and release test them, which means a shop. 

post #11 of 13

Oldgoat, what you aren't accounting for is that the DIN on the binding may not be accurate.  That's why shops generally will do a binding test at the same time as setting the binding.  So while the chart (given height, weight, boot sole length, and skiing type) may say 8, the binding may need to be set on 10 or 6 depending on the newton meters needed to cause the binding to release.

 

Personally, I'd have the shop mount and test the bindings.  If you then want to adjust them up or down, you then at least have a baseline from whence to do so.

 

Mike

post #12 of 13

If you haven't changed your boots or your weight, then it's pretty simple.  8 is not enough (from experience), 10 is enough (from experience), so try 9.

Personally I would rather be at the bottom of a solid racing binding's DIN range than in the middle of a lesser binding's range.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
 

Oldgoat, what you aren't accounting for is that the DIN on the binding may not be accurate.  That's why shops generally will do a binding test at the same time as setting the binding.  So while the chart (given height, weight, boot sole length, and skiing type) may say 8, the binding may need to be set on 10 or 6 depending on the newton meters needed to cause the binding to release.

 

Personally, I'd have the shop mount and test the bindings.  If you then want to adjust them up or down, you then at least have a baseline from whence to do so.

 

Mike

I believe I addressed the issue specifically in my post and recommended having the bindings tested but whatever. To play devil's advocate, which is more accurate--a new binding produced in a modern factory with good QC, or a binding test machine that has tested thousands of bindings, that was calibrated god-knows-when, in the hands of a tech of unknown experience (but not under the influence of controlled substances). And maybe someone here can tell me--how do binding makers do QC? Test every binding, test every nth binding, test none and hope for the best? Obviously QC can't account for severely worn boots, but if the boot is not so severely worn and there is the proper 0.5mm gap between boot and AFD, how much variation between boots is there in release torque? I'm asking--I don't know. 

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