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Inside of Boots Scratches

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

I am buying a new pair of boots, and after examination of my old ones, found that I have put many a scratch in the inside ankle area. I keep my skis pretty close together, usually over some pretty bumpy stuff, so I'm assuming my ski edge comes down on my boot as I plant my feet  I don't want to do this too much- Even though it adds character, there is probably an underlying problem. I as wondering what might be the solution to this conundrum; is there an inane problem with the way I ski that this highlights?

I'm 6'2", 167- the new boots are to replace loose ones. I'm pretty aggressive, and  I usually ski groomers to get to trees and bumps.

 

As a side note, I'm wicked clumsy, so I'm sure that has caused a scratch or two.

 

Thanks,

Robert

post #2 of 14

you can just stick on some material on the  area of your boot if you want to protect from scratches.  

 

What can you use?

I've not done it myself, 

Duct tape or other repair tape has some thickness to it.

 

If you want to go all the way, what I would do (just brainstorming  here) would be to use paint protection film (clear bra) which is film designed specifically to take wear and tear and take on scratches and scuffs.

 

you can find pieces for sale at amazon, directly (e.g. xpel), or you can also start calling around to auto tint places around you that do clearbra.

post #3 of 14

That's just one of the things that happens when you ski, especially if you use wide(ish) skis.

 

Your skis have sharp edges; you sometimes hit bumps and stuff that push your feet together (or you crash); your edges scratch whatever surface they hit. It's why a lot of ski pants have scuff guards at the bottom of the inner leg.

post #4 of 14
What does "...plant my feet" mean?
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

What does "...plant my feet" mean?
It's a new species. Grows faster than the Pole plant.
You should see the gouges of slalom skiers's boots.
post #6 of 14

Didn't they use to make boots with padding on the insides so that the contour was flat, back when skiing with your feet together was in style (and before skis got too wide to let your boots touch)? Maybe someone with more determination than I have will post a picture. And there was a picture somewhere in this forum in the last day or two of an old ski boot that came with metal patches on the insides. (Maybe less confusing to use the term "medial" for the surface of the boot that faces the other boot, so as not to confuse with "inside"--the part of a Rossignol boot that gets wet.)

post #7 of 14
You thinking of the Rosemont boot?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I've got these from the late 1960s:





Not a DIN standard sole, so I've not put them into a binding for years.


I've got a ton of old Kastle, Kneissl, Hexcel, etc. skis. Unlike Phil, I have no desire to keep using them.
post #8 of 14

I don't ski with my feet too close together and the inside of my boots are sliced and diced!

As you know I always have ultra sharp edges!

post #9 of 14

If you slice and cut your boots fast enough to compromise their structural integrity before they would normally need to be retired, then you do indeed have a problem, otherwise it's merely cosmetic.  This shouldn't really be a concern since no one insists on judging others by how cut up the insides of the boots are.  Everybody does it to at least some degree - nobody cares.

post #10 of 14

Billy Kidd had a favorite pair of Langes he cut until they caved in, at which point he bolted a sheet of metal over the cut through area.  Must have been a great fitting pair! 

post #11 of 14
I resemble those boots, Tog: Old. A-man's skis wouldn't remain sharp long with Rosemonts.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

You thinking of the Rosemont boot?

When I was a kid people who had them were so cool.
post #13 of 14
Are you cutting you boots with your ski edges or just scuffing them? Scuffing happens, but it should not be enough to damage your boots.
Bump skiers tend to ski with their skis very close together, you will see their knees together as well, so there is not much "foot planting" going on. Their skis are not real fat.
If you are cutting your boots with your ski edges you many be skiing with your legs to close together. Your neutral stance should be as if you were standing when not skiing, legs shoulder apart in a natural stance; this gives you stability. Skis should move apart and together from there.
I see some people swishing down the hill with locked legs together, this sort of looks pretty but is not the stablest method to ski; very old school.
One other idea to think about is that there is a excises for people learning to ski where you lift one leg off the snow to unweight it, it is a good way to learn independent ski control but not what you want to do skiing; you want to keep both skis on the ground; more or less. Try thinking of leaving some weight on both skis, just put most of it on the outside ski. I often ski with both skis edging to some degree, this became popular in racing with Tomba, of course in racing they carry it beyond what you may do free skiing.
Also make sure your weighted leg's knee is tucked slightly behind the unweighted knee; or if you wish like mostly weighted leg.
With out seeing you ski I do not know exactly why you are cutting your boots. You could have someone video you skiing and see if you are doing any of the things that I was talking about.
Edited by tomfifield - 1/28/15 at 10:06am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperBravo View Post
 

Hello all,

 

I am buying a new pair of boots, and after examination of my old ones, found that I have put many a scratch in the inside ankle area. I keep my skis pretty close together, usually over some pretty bumpy stuff, so I'm assuming my ski edge comes down on my boot as I plant my feet  I don't want to do this too much- Even though it adds character, there is probably an underlying problem. I as wondering what might be the solution to this conundrum; is there an inane problem with the way I ski that this highlights?

I'm 6'2", 167- the new boots are to replace loose ones. I'm pretty aggressive, and  I usually ski groomers to get to trees and bumps.

 

As a side note, I'm wicked clumsy, so I'm sure that has caused a scratch or two.

 

Thanks,

Robert

 

Not a 'problem'. Anyone's stance is dependent on a number of important factors - and will vary somewhat. Reading into 'boot cuts' will have you chasing your tail...

The more time you spend on steeper terrain the higher the likelihood that you'll get cuts. The more time you spend in bumps - ditto. Spend some time on real steep stuff and you'll be cuttin the pants legs...

Duct tape is your friend - 2 layers takes a lot of those hits so that you'll get mostly small marks - I replace the tape every 2-5 days or so, depending on where I'm skiing.

I've tried the heat-applied patches for the pants legs, but fund duct still works as well (or better) and is easily replaced when it gets scruffty.

If you're hittin the hot sauce terrain and gettin cuts - Don;t worry, be happy  :beercheer:

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