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Kids skis - 11yr old girl

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

My daughter has outgrown her current skis and I need to get her some that better fit her size and weight.

 

She's about 4'1 and 65ish lbs.. and looking at the kids/youth skis I'm lost as to what I should be getting her.

 

She isn't a racer, nor is there any plans for that, just need a good rec ski, 99% groomers, rarely any crud or powder, almost exclusively hardpack/ice.  She gets out maybe 5-10 times a year at tops, and has finally started to ski parallel.  I'm not sure why i started her with a wedge, but a few quick lessons on parallel skiing and she's got it and left the wedge behind thankfully.

 

There isn't much choice for a girls ski.. every vendor has 1 or two models tops that would work.  I don't know if i should get her a shorter womans ski instead of a junior, or even what length I should be considering.

 

We deal with a ton of ice being from Ontario.. so I have that to deal with too.  I could just go out and buy whatever is on sale or something used, i doubt she would notice the different now, but hopefully by next year i'll have her well on the way to actually carving and need something that will be somewhat competent in this regard.

 

Any suggestions?

post #2 of 14

Rent is one option.

 

Lenght -10cm is the rule of thumb for kids (or so I´ve learned) so 4'1  is 125ish cm, that means 115cm would be good, 110 would work for a beginner and 120 for someone with more experience.

 

Most used kids gear I´ve seen has had very dull edges, so if you buy used a tuning might be well worth the money. Don´t buy to boots that are to big, if the fit well a centimeter of spare is ok.  Count buying gear quite often, they always grow to the next size until next season..

post #3 of 14

Go with 120s.  My kid is that size and an advanced beginner/intermediate.  He's very comfortable on that size.  Big enough to hold on advanced terrain but nimble enough for him to easily manage at 65 pounds. Used is fine especially since they outgrow it quickly.  Just make sure it is well maintained.

post #4 of 14
Don't get adult skis they are too stiff. The length is up to the nose. Don't listen to people suggesting suzes, just measure her up. A used kids race ski may be a good option, they are much better than regular kids skis, especially on ice, and most likely have been maintained much better. Rentals are complete junk usually and come with poorly adjusted wobbly bindings.
post #5 of 14
^^yes. One of the things with a kids race ski is bindings are more likely to be mounted more "normally"and not way back towards the tail like a lot of kids skis. Mounting way back makes wedging position easier but skiing harder. Definitely discourages parallel skiing. Pay attention to mount point but you'd need a shop that's not mindless and is willing to experiment. There's no safety issue.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

^^yes. One of the things with a kids race ski is bindings are more likely to be mounted more "normally"and not way back towards the tail like a lot of kids skis. Mounting way back makes wedging position easier but skiing harder. Definitely discourages parallel skiing. Pay attention to mount point but you'd need a shop that's not mindless and is willing to experiment. There's no safety issue.


That's what I'm looking for.. something that actively encourages parallel and a carved turn.  Rentals are out of the question.. for as much as she skis it's cheaper to buy some for her even if I have to replace them in a year.

 

What about width underfoot and rocker.. should that be something I should be concerned about? 

post #7 of 14
Take note of kids skis and binding position. This is something you can change to make the same ski perform much better.
Generally no rocker and fairly narrow for where u are. Not familiar with kids waist widths but you want nearer a race aki than a junior gotama.
Conaiderq used carver and a fatter one maybe twin tip.
post #8 of 14

My 4  foot 65 pounder is skiing head Mojo 65 Jon Olssons in a 117 right now.  And yes bindings are mounted close the mid sole line.   Did move up a size in boots so he went from +1 to closer to 0.

 

The ski is a 2007 model, but just pointing out a 65 waist is moderate for kids that size these days. 

 

These look like the current version of that type of ski.

 

 

Quote:

Supershape Team LR

 

 

 

Length shovel waist tails radius
157 119 69 103 11,4
147 116 69 100 10,4
137 113 68 98 9,0
127 111 67 96 8,0
117 108 67 94 6,9
107 106 66 92 5,7
97 104 65 89 5,3
87 103 65 89 4,0

 

post #9 of 14

How good a skier is she?

 

For length, I'd consider nose-height to be a bit long.  Chin-height may be more manageable.

 

Definitely stay away from adult skis.

 

My kids have been happy enough with the Blizzard Viva Jr.  It's not perfect, but it's affordable, girly and race-inspired.  If you're worried about ice, stay away from wide skis, twin tips, rocker, etc.  One nice thing about the Viva Jr. is that the binding position is adjustable without drilling and screwing.

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post
 

How good a skier is she?

 

For length, I'd consider nose-height to be a bit long.  Chin-height may be more manageable.

 

Definitely stay away from adult skis.

 

My kids have been happy enough with the Blizzard Viva Jr.  It's not perfect, but it's affordable, girly and race-inspired.  If you're worried about ice, stay away from wide skis, twin tips, rocker, etc.  One nice thing about the Viva Jr. is that the binding position is adjustable without drilling and screwing.

 

She just started parallel skiing.. and is doing quite well.. quickly is unlearning the whole wedge way of skiing.  Was just going to tune up her skis and saw on the top sheet they were rated for 50lbs.  I think they're 95~100cm range.

 

We've been doing a few runs and then I'll make her do a few drills to get used to using the edges, and then let her do her own thing for the next few runs.. and go back and forth like this all day.  Luckily she still likes her daddy and wants to listen and learn.  She's starting to recognize good skiing vs smearing down the hill..We watch people on the lift and I get her to try and critique what she sees people doing.  She also is doing well staying centered.

 

Mild blue runs are a non-issue.. anything with a bit of pitch more than 35~40 degrees she'll get back on her heels and want to fall back into a wedge..  just more practice and experience to get over it I think..  she was blasting through some crud (4-5" of machine groomed granular all rutted up and piled..) on a few runs and had no issues parallel skiing it.. with nice even turns..

 

She isn't doing any jumps yet.. i don't know if she'll ever use the terrain park.. bit more of a girly girl who likes to push until she falls, and then drops back a lot.

 

I figure that if I can get her to start using her edges now.. when she gets older it will be second nature.. she won't have to unlearn what she's doing.. I don't think shaped skis are going away so I have the chance now to reinforce good technique, because soon enough she'll probably  won't want to ski with dad anymore and be chasing boys instead.

 

Any gear that helps with that goal of good skiing (not the chasing boys part) I'm interested in.. I don't know that race skis will cut it.. mainly cause they won't be pretty enough.. but we'll see. 

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Mild blue runs are a non-issue.. anything with a bit of pitch more than 35~40 degrees she'll get back on her heels and want to fall back into a wedge..  just more practice and experience to get over it I think.
If that's right that's way too steep! 40 degrees?? A green skiier? (mostly wedge, level 4-5)

As far as unlearing the wedge you can have her go on gentle terrain and ski a wedge properly. Release the downhil with slight flattening by tipping, move downhill towards the inside of the new turn, steer the skis, and allow the pressure to build on the outside ski. Don't insist on a wedge though. Let it go to parallel. The moves are the same.

The number one problem is kids/people pushing on the outside ski. They need to learn to let the skis push them. Commit to going downhill and let the skis come around and support them. On steep terrain, it's likely she hunkers down on heels, slowly gets the new outside ski out there while she's still uphill then commits to it and brings it around. Doing that over and over really actually reinforces it.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post


If that's right that's way too steep! 40 degrees?? A green skiier? (mostly wedge, level 4-5)
 

LOL.. no i'm not throwing her down stupid steep long pitches..  some hills have little rolls or dips.. 20 feet in length or so.. something you or I would probably just take a little hop off of, or roll a carve into.. then they flatten out to 15~20 degrees or so..  I'm just saying that when she gets out of her comfort zone she wants to go back to a wedge instead of staying parallel and trust her edges..  something that will come with more experience and confidence.  I'm not worried about it.

 

When we're working together on her skills I'm mainly getting her start going down the fall line and then to roll her skis on edge and let then naturally make a right or left turn without pushing on the ski.. mainly a park and ride for now so she can get a feel for the ski working..  trying to get her to not steer the ski by rotating them.  Much the same way kids learn that leaning a bike makes them go around a corner.. and as long as they're moving it's ok to lean a bit and they won't just fall over.

post #13 of 14

Here's an idea I've been following with my own kids.  Make sure the skis are always sharp (1 degree base, 3 degree side) and waxed.  This forces them to control speed deliberately and provides them with to tools to do so.

 

The description of skills above sounds like low intermediate, at least on the kid scale.  There's no reason at this level for long skis.  They'll provide little benefit and may get in the way.  I'm always leery of long levers in a fall.

 

The terrain park isn't everyone's cup of tea, but small jumps are a good idea.  Being in the air helps teach fore-aft balance.

 

By the way, 40-degrees is quite steep.  Most slopes seem steeper than they measure.  At Squaw Valley, it's hard to find a true 40-degree pitch without hiking.  When I stand atop one, it's not a casual experience.

post #14 of 14

You are talking like wedging is a bad thing. It's not. It's one of those skills that is good to have in the back pocket. Don't listen to your buddies (or your ego) who tell you otherwise. You will be surprised how often regular and even high level skiers use that "backup" skill in certain situations. Variations of wedging sometimes are used in advanced fundamentals.

Now, as for what to get her. Very simple and don't over think it. She is recreational, somewhat timid and she is small. Get her something chin to forehead long. DO NOT GET ADULT SKIS for her unless she is super strong (physically and skill-wise) or super heavy; and even then you should wait another 2 years or so. Other than that, pretty much any ski, except race stock will work. If you want quality skis and are willing to pay a bit more then shop for a pair of mid to high-end all mountains, twins or multiple event racer. They will let her progress and get on the edge better (as well as holding up better quality wise).


Edited by chanwmr - 1/28/15 at 9:39pm
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