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ideas on edge tuning tool

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

I am an advanced skier and I ski very often on  Volkl RTM.

I want to start to hand sharpen my skis rather then take them to the shop.

What ideas would you all have for tools that would not be too expensive but set a good edge.

I was looking at an SKS multi tool with DMT stones as well as some other similar tools, but am open to other ideas

Also, do I need a ceramic and gummi stone?

Thanks!

post #2 of 10
Grabbing my soda and popcorn.
Anyone need anything while I am up???
post #3 of 10
popcorn.gif
post #4 of 10
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by east ice View Post
 

Hi all,

I am an advanced skier and I ski very often on  Volkl RTM.

I want to start to hand sharpen my skis rather then take them to the shop.

What ideas would you all have for tools that would not be too expensive but set a good edge.

I was looking at an SKS multi tool with DMT stones as well as some other similar tools, but am open to other ideas

Also, do I need a ceramic and gummi stone?

Thanks!


You gonna need a lot of stuff.  You get what you pay for.
http://www.the-raceplace.com/Elite-Tune-Package-p/3040.htm

post #6 of 10

Ghost - That was a good link!.

 

The BEST thing I did after years of struggling on my garage workshop bench or the kitchen table was to buy a

ski specific work bench and decent late model, three piece ski vise.

 

I like to tune in my living room where the lights, heat, stereo, and big screen are more congenial to tuning!

(I throw down a plastic tarp to cover the floor...Hey MY house!....lol) 

 

I know people will make their own tables and vise set ups however I am very happy with the Swix ones I picked up last year. 

 

Here are the web sites for all the tuning shops and gear I frequent

(Great tips on there too!)

 

www.artech-ski.com

www.the-raceplace.com

www.tognar.com

www.fktools-us.com

http://www.slidewright.com

 

 

Here is what I personally own and would consider essential for a basic ski tuning setup:

(I included the prices I paid just as a reference point)...The stuff in bold are my "must haves"

 

Again please realize there are LOTS of ways to skin this cat!

 

 

Swix T754 Bench - $120.00 (I picked this up on sale late season)

Swix T0149-90W Vise - $205.00

 

Swix T073 Iron - $165.00

Swix Iron Holder - $30.00 (I LOVE THIS THING!!!)

Swix Iron Cover - $25.00

 

Swix 2nd pass 8” files Qty 2 - $45.00

File card - $8.00

Swix ceramic stone Fine - $22.00

Swix blue gummi stone - $12.00 (Qty 2)

Swix red gummi stone - $12.00

 

Swix 1790 Stainless oval brush - $65.00

Swix Nylon oval brush - $50.00

 

Swix Scraper 5mm - $9.00

Toko Scraper 5mm - $5.00

Artech true bar - $15.00

 

Diaface Moon flex diamond file 100 - $34.00

Diaface Moon flex diamond file 200 - $34.00

Diaface Moon flex diamond file 400 - $34.00

Smith’s Translucent Arkansas hard stone - $16.00

 

Base Beast 1 degree - $20.00

Base Beast .75 Degree - $20.00

Plane Beast - $40.00

Side of Beast 3 degree - $60.00

 

Toko Ceramic Scraper sharpener - $35.00

SKS brake retainers - $16.00 (Qty 3 sets)

Wintersteiger Pocket Whetstone - $3.00

 

Various Swix and Dominator ski and prep waxes ($200.00)

Base and edge eye loup - $10.00

220 grit wet or dry sandpaper

Industrial nylon and brass brushes (Look like a big toothbrush)

Heavy Duty Extension cord - $15.00

 

 

YMMV

Good luck and good tuning!

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by east ice View Post
 

Hi all,

I am an advanced skier and I ski very often on  Volkl RTM.

I want to start to hand sharpen my skis rather then take them to the shop.

What ideas would you all have for tools that would not be too expensive but set a good edge.

I was looking at an SKS multi tool with DMT stones as well as some other similar tools, but am open to other ideas

Also, do I need a ceramic and gummi stone?

Thanks!

Like most everything, it's a process and in order to get good repeatable results the right steps need to be taken.  You aren't asking about waxing so I'm not even going to go down that road.  I'll just assume you have that side of DIY tuning covered.  If not, read one of the many threads on what waxing tools you need to DIY waxing.

 

First, you or a shop, need to pull the sidewall away from the edge.  This task requires a sidewall planer.  It's a specialty tool that you'll only ever use for this job.  Make one, buy one, you can decide BUT it is a must have tool for edge tuning.

 

The rest of the tools you'll need, in no particular order, are:  

 

A side edge file guide and a spring clamp.  I'd recommend getting a 3 degree and depending on manufacturer it could be called a 87 or 93 but either way they are the same thing.

 

Some diamond stones.  Like everything else, they come in a variety of colors shapes and sizes.  DMT makes a nice little 4 stone kit that comes in its own pouch. http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/DMT-4-Diamond-Whetstone-Deluxe-Kit-with-4-Grits-P504.aspx?gclid=CI3avqjktMMCFQZafgod1ZoAjA   Which ones you use will depend on the condition of your edge/s.  Touch up tuning, you'll likely only used the two finest grits.  The more damaged the edge, the more course the stone but always progress to the finest grit and finish with a polishing stone like the ceramic.

 

Hard stone.  Ceramic or Arkansas.  My personal favorite is a double sided ceramic stone.  I use mine for deburring as well as polishing.  They last forever BUT handle them with care as they do not like to be dropped on concrete floors.  Ask me how I know. lol

 

Gummi stone/s  My suggestion would be to get the Swix red and blue gummi stones.  I've got a couple of the softer silver gummis but I probably use the hard blue gummi 80% of the time.

 

Panzer file.  The panzer file is the workhorse of the file world, it can be used for a variety of tasks so I always recommend getting one.

 

There's a variety of other little things you'll add along the way but this is a list of the essentials, IMO.

 

Some sort of a longish, soft, dense bristled paint brush is also a good item to have.  Works great for brushing debris off the sidewalls but be careful not to get any grease from your binding on the bristles or you could be smearing it all over your bases and not know it.

post #8 of 10

I have the same question as the OP, but it seems like you guys threw the entire "kitchen sink" at him.  Could you tone it down a bit.

I haven't worried much about my skis because i only ski a few times per year.  I've waxed my xc skies for years but that a necessity for waxables.

I decided to wax my downhills this year and I noticed a significant improvement in speed on the flats. I want to proceed to the next step. 

 

I would like to do a very basic tune on my edges w/o getting into advanced tuning so I'm a little further ahead of where I am at now (which is zero) and play with and become comfortable with the bottom of my skis before i proceed.  Also, my way of thinking, I do one thing using one tool and the job is 70% done, for very little money, and i"ll worry about the other complicated 30% later.

Are you going to tell me I just can't start with one tool to get going and worry about the most obvious?

post #9 of 10
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

I have the same question as the OP, but it seems like you guys threw the entire "kitchen sink" at him.  Could you tone it down a bit.

I haven't worried much about my skis because i only ski a few times per year.  I've waxed my xc skies for years but that a necessity for waxables.

I decided to wax my downhills this year and I noticed a significant improvement in speed on the flats. I want to proceed to the next step. 

 

I would like to do a very basic tune on my edges w/o getting into advanced tuning so I'm a little further ahead of where I am at now (which is zero) and play with and become comfortable with the bottom of my skis before i proceed.  Also, my way of thinking, I do one thing using one tool and the job is 70% done, for very little money, and i"ll worry about the other complicated 30% later.

Are you going to tell me I just can't start with one tool to get going and worry about the most obvious?

You could go with one of those little plastic edge tuners if you like but depending on the ski, it may or may not work because the sidewall could be in the way and it won't let the file sit down on the metal edge.

 

If you're looking for the most inexpensive way to go, that'd likely be it and if "good enough" is a phrase you often use, well, maybe one of those tools would be perfect for you.

post #10 of 10

I have gone both routes,multi-angle tool and dedicated angle. By far the dedicated side edge guide and base edge guide using  a high quality full size file are the way to go. To make it more affordable and still have quality tools I chose a Beast side edge guide and a Archtech base edge guide. I have a good quality 3 piece vise but my table, that I use outside ( Phoenix Az) is simply a 2 x 6 with well made folding metal legs (that I believe were sold as heavy duty sawhorse legs) You still need a coarse and med diamond and a gummi stone. I use a med. file to sharpen both our skis after every trip of 4 days or more and this setup works great

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