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Switching from K2 Cabrawler to Maestro...binding question

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I'm planning on buying a pair of Bluehouse Maestros this Feb when I fly out to SLC to ski for the week.

Question: Should I cannibalize the Tyrolia 280 SLDs that have worked fine on my Cabrawler bump skis and have them mounted on my new Maestros?  Or should I pay the $175 and go with the Look PX12  Bluehouse sells?  Seems like the PX 12s are just traditional bindings like my Tyrolias, so I'm inclined to cannibalize and save the $$. Thanks.

post #2 of 15

What are you going to use for your bump ski going forward?  I'd keep the brawlers as is and put different bindings on the Maestros so you can increase your quiver options.  .. unless you already have another different ski that is better in the bumps than the Cabrawlers. 

 

Why not look at other new or used binding options for the new skis instead of cutting your quiver options?
 

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

I wouldn't have a bump ski option if I cannibalized.

 

 But I live in Charlotte now, and history has shown that I only get out west to ski once a year these days(I've never skied the Smokies, and I don't ski the East anymore).   So I'm not sure how much of a candidate I am for a ski quiver.   And they charge $35 each way to carry skis on planes these days. BUT if I can bring out two pairs for the price of one then maybe that could become an option.    

 

Anyone know if you get charged per bag or per pair of skis?   I'd assume it is per bag.

post #4 of 15

Meh, they don't let bumps grow much around here.  Sometimes they'll let one side of a Highlands run at Wintergreen bump up a little. And Massanutten also has a section that they leave ungroomed sometimes.  You can probably sell the Cabrawlers if they are in good shape.  I've already got a pair and still ski them occasionally.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

Oh, no, I don't plan to start skiing the smokies/NC/VA/WV.  If its not good bumps/powder/trees, I'm really not that interested.  I could see maybe doing some snowboarding, because I'm not much good at that, and these places would be  a decent enough challenge.

 

I guess the smart thing to do would be to bring the Cabrawlers out to Utah and compare/contrast with the Maestros, and see if I

want to keep them.  No need to make any rash decisions.

post #6 of 15


If you pull the binders then what good are the Cabrawlers?  if you buy something later you will be paying for two mounts instead of one.

 

Airlines charge per bag.  While the official language typically says *1* pair of skis, i've been taking two pair since the 1990s.  Weight limit = 50 lbs.

 

Boot Bag + ski bag = 1 item.  But, depending on the gate agent, they could enforce 50 lbs for the total of ski bag + boot bags.  Boots + 2 pairs might be past the 50 pound mark

post #7 of 15

You're gonna want the Cabrawlers if you ever make it (back) to Mary Jane.  Seriously, get bindings for the new Maestros.  The Cabrawlers will be better on hard snow days too, not just in the bumps.

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

I checked United's site, and they say 2 pair skis per bag, but 50lb limit.

 

Good point about having to pay for the extra mount in the future.  So, yeah, I'll just get new bindings for the Maestros.   I guess my question was ultimately,

are folks going to say the Maestros are such a great all around ski that I won't ever want/need to ski the Cabrawlers anymore.   The answer seems to be, "no".

Thanks to everyone for your thoughts and input.  Appreciated.

 

FYI: 

https://www.united.com/web/en-Us/Content/travel/baggage/sports.aspx

"United accepts one item of ski or snowboard equipment per customer as checked baggage. Equipment must be securely encased in a suitable container. An item of ski equipment consists of:

  • Water ski
  • Up to two snowboards in one bag
  • Up to two pairs of snow skis and associated equipment in one bag and one ski boot bag. (Note: If ski boot bag contains other items in addition to or in place of boots, it will be subject to the applicable checked baggage service charge or excess baggage service charge.)

First or second checked bag service charges may apply.

Ski equipment in addition to the baggage allowance will be assessed at the current excess baggage charge for a single piece, whether or not it is presented as a single piece.

Ski and boot bags weighing more than 50 pounds (23 kg) that contain other items in addition to or in place of appropriate ski equipment will be subject to the applicable overweight checked baggage service charge."

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

I got back from Utah a week or so ago.  We had some new snow, so I got the Bluehouse Maestros mounted.

The first day I skied them was at Snowbird (which hadn't gotten the snow) and there was no powder, it was pretty much frozen granular all-around. I was miserable.  The Maestros edge would lock in much fiercer than my Cabrawlers ever would, and was often scared of being thrown to the ground.  Plus the tails were so sticky (also grabbing the edge) I felt like they were crossed when they weren't. Very odd.  This would NEVER happen on my Cabrawlers.  So on such conditions, that is to say sh*tty conditions, I'd rather be on my Cabrawlers.

 

Next day we got out to Powder Mountain where they had a decent amount of powder and some excellent intermediate level tree skiing, namely, a trailed called North Slope.  In these conditions the Maestros felt like a well worn glove.  

 

One of the surprising aspects of the ski was how it didn't let me / it wasn't enjoyable to lean back in the powder.  It seems to prefer a much more forward, balanced stance.  This took a little getting used to.

 

Also, with decent powder coverage, the skis were very quick and agile in the bumps. Clearly, not as quick/fast as the Cabrawlers,

but with just  a bit more care and effort I could get them in a relatively similar fashion.  

 

I was expecting the skis to feel floaty, languid, soft, springy and boat like, but rather they were like quick, snappy, grippy snow shoes or paddles.

 

So to my surprise, despite their vast difference in appearances and characteristics, I felt that ultimately the final skingi experience wasn't that different on the two skis.  That is: Yes, on icy, hard stuff, I'll take the skinny Cabrawlers, Yes, on the super powder days, I'll take the Maestros.  But on the in-between days I could certainly have an equal amount of fun on both of these skis.  

 

It's still skiing, and they are both well designed/engineered tools for the job of skiing.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmdoug View Post
 

I got back from Utah a week or so ago.  We had some new snow, so I got the Bluehouse Maestros mounted.

The first day I skied them was at Snowbird (which hadn't gotten the snow) and there was no powder, it was pretty much frozen granular all-around. I was miserable.  The Maestros edge would lock in much fiercer than my Cabrawlers ever would, and was often scared of being thrown to the ground.  Plus the tails were so sticky (also grabbing the edge) I felt like they were crossed when they weren't. Very odd.  This would NEVER happen on my Cabrawlers.  So on such conditions, that is to say sh*tty conditions, I'd rather be on my Cabrawlers.

 

Next day we got out to Powder Mountain where they had a decent amount of powder and some excellent intermediate level tree skiing, namely, a trailed called North Slope.  In these conditions the Maestros felt like a well worn glove.  

 

One of the surprising aspects of the ski was how it didn't let me / it wasn't enjoyable to lean back in the powder.  It seems to prefer a much more forward, balanced stance.  This took a little getting used to.

 

Also, with decent powder coverage, the skis were very quick and agile in the bumps. Clearly, not as quick/fast as the Cabrawlers,

but with just  a bit more care and effort I could get them in a relatively similar fashion.  

 

I was expecting the skis to feel floaty, languid, soft, springy and boat like, but rather they were like quick, snappy, grippy snow shoes or paddles.

 

So to my surprise, despite their vast difference in appearances and characteristics, I felt that ultimately the final skingi experience wasn't that different on the two skis.  That is: Yes, on icy, hard stuff, I'll take the skinny Cabrawlers, Yes, on the super powder days, I'll take the Maestros.  But on the in-between days I could certainly have an equal amount of fun on both of these skis.  

 

It's still skiing, and they are both well designed/engineered tools for the job of skiing.


Your issues with the Maestros sounds like an issue with tuning.  The tails will release and be less hooky if de-tuned properly.

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmdoug View Post
 

I got back from Utah a week or so ago.  We had some new snow, so I got the Bluehouse Maestros mounted.

The first day I skied them was at Snowbird (which hadn't gotten the snow) and there was no powder, it was pretty much frozen granular all-around. I was miserable.  The Maestros edge would lock in much fiercer than my Cabrawlers ever would, and was often scared of being thrown to the ground.  Plus the tails were so sticky (also grabbing the edge) I felt like they were crossed when they weren't. Very odd.  This would NEVER happen on my Cabrawlers.  So on such conditions, that is to say sh*tty conditions, I'd rather be on my Cabrawlers.

 

Next day we got out to Powder Mountain where they had a decent amount of powder and some excellent intermediate level tree skiing, namely, a trailed called North Slope.  In these conditions the Maestros felt like a well worn glove.  

 

One of the surprising aspects of the ski was how it didn't let me / it wasn't enjoyable to lean back in the powder.  It seems to prefer a much more forward, balanced stance.  This took a little getting used to.

 

Also, with decent powder coverage, the skis were very quick and agile in the bumps. Clearly, not as quick/fast as the Cabrawlers,

but with just  a bit more care and effort I could get them in a relatively similar fashion.  

 

I was expecting the skis to feel floaty, languid, soft, springy and boat like, but rather they were like quick, snappy, grippy snow shoes or paddles.

 

So to my surprise, despite their vast difference in appearances and characteristics, I felt that ultimately the final skingi experience wasn't that different on the two skis.  That is: Yes, on icy, hard stuff, I'll take the skinny Cabrawlers, Yes, on the super powder days, I'll take the Maestros.  But on the in-between days I could certainly have an equal amount of fun on both of these skis.  

 

It's still skiing, and they are both well designed/engineered tools for the job of skiing.

Yeah man, skiing is skiing.

 

I've spent a bunch of days in all kinds of conditions on both of these skis.....over the years.  I too was completely taken aback by how versitle the Maestro is.  Pretty much concur with this whole review.  I've got a quiver of race skis and a quiver of off piste oriented boards and these two skis are my two faves in the bumps.

 

FWIW I don't do any detuning and don't plan to.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
 

Yeah man, skiing is skiing.

 

I've spent a bunch of days in all kinds of conditions on both of these skis.....over the years.  I too was completely taken aback by how versitle the Maestro is.  Pretty much concur with this whole review.  I've got a quiver of race skis and a quiver of off piste oriented boards and these two skis are my two faves in the bumps.

 

FWIW I don't do any detuning and don't plan to.

 

 

Agreed, a slight technique adjustment when skiing the wider boards on hardpack will resolve the grabbyness.. try unweighting the inside ski a little more at the end of the turn.  You'll probably adjust without even thinking about it after a little more time caught out with the less optimal hardpack ski

 

Glad you resolved the binding shortage btw...

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the Maestro recco bumbfreaq, and the confirm on my review.  

Bindings? Yeah, not sure what I was thinking there.   Two pairs of skis is definitely better than one pair, especially when fat and skinny.

Thanks for the help / guidance guys.

post #14 of 15

Also a Maestro owner here, searching for a set of Mavens...

 

The Maestros are the closest thing to a fat "do anything" ski I have ever skied. 

 

My limits with them aren't really performance, but a 117 waist ski hurts my feet after a long day of skiing firm snow...

 

I suspect your Cabrawlers are out of tune if the Maestros felt hooky- with 50% of the ski turned up on each end and a lot of taper on each end too, there isn't much to hook!

 

I like Maestros in bumps, except in a tight, deep bumpfield where I can't get them quite close enough together. I found I liked them a lot more in Taos bumps than my 185 CM Volant T3's- the flat tail of the Volants liked to get caught up in the departing trough...

 

As for not liking backseat, I haven't noticed that (I spend a lot of time on the heels in flat pitch/deep snow at Wolf- which is why I am looking for a 130+ waist ski), although if your point of comparison was trying to float bump skis in powder, then yeah, the Maestros will want to be more centered.

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Cabrawlers/tune?  Funny that you would say that, because I pretty much never tune my skis, wax or sharpen, but since they were gouged last year, I had them tuned before this trip.

So my first days on the Cabrawlers were with sharper than normal edges for me.  

 

What I mean about locking in and hooking is that when its edge catches it seems to stick like the ski is on a railroad, with a mind of its own.  I'm  assuming this has to do with the width of the ski, it just doesn't roll/flex/flip like a twig the way the Cabrawler will.     Of course I was a totally newbie on the ski at this point, and

I might have been skiing it in a manner that someone with more time on it would instinctively never do.  Dunno.

 

Fat skis hurting feet?  Well, I found the Maestros pretty exhausting on that frozen granular.  Not sure if it was just the extra work and stress of trying to figure out new skis on non-optimal conditions, or what.   But I could see how all that extra surface area on flat, hard stuff could make things more painful.

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