or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skiing! Science! Starting this week I'll be recording and analyzing acceleration at my boots and my helmet.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Skiing! Science! Starting this week I'll be recording and analyzing acceleration at my boots and my helmet.

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Well, you know you are getting bored with school when you have nothing better to do than partner up with a professor to do some research into skiing. Last semester I took a course with a professor that teaches physiology, and one of his favourite activities is to jump in the water, wrestle with sea critters (otters, seals, horseshoe crabs, you name it) and stick accelerometers on them. Sounds kinda funny, but he swears it is all for science. Anyway, as ski season began, I thought about the forces generated at boot during race turns. After some beer and discussion, he has agreed to loaning a handful of fancy accelerometers to me for the rest of the season so we can track not only forces generated at boot and helmet, but also analyze which turns (left/right) and what type of turns (stivot, carve, etc) need refining. The boot mounts will be drilled to the shell to ensure rigidity between boot and sensor.

 

I'll be updating as things go along, should be mounting them this Thursday at the shop.

post #2 of 6

A little light reading to get you started.

http://e-collection.library.ethz.ch/view/eth:28070

post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
 

Well, you know you are getting bored with school when you have nothing better to do than partner up with a professor to do some research into skiing. Last semester I took a course with a professor that teaches physiology, and one of his favourite activities is to jump in the water, wrestle with sea critters (otters, seals, horseshoe crabs, you name it) and stick accelerometers on them. Sounds kinda funny, but he swears it is all for science. Anyway, as ski season began, I thought about the forces generated at boot during race turns. After some beer and discussion, he has agreed to loaning a handful of fancy accelerometers to me for the rest of the season so we can track not only forces generated at boot and helmet, but also analyze which turns (left/right) and what type of turns (stivot, carve, etc) need refining. The boot mounts will be drilled to the shell to ensure rigidity between boot and sensor.

 

I'll be updating as things go along, should be mounting them this Thursday at the shop.

Your professor has the right idea. Other fields you might want to look at--glaciology, climatology, hydrology, geology.  All of these offer the opportunity to recreate at the public's expense. 

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Your professor has the right idea. Other fields you might want to look at--glaciology, climatology, hydrology, geology.  All of these offer the opportunity to recreate at the public's expense. 

 

And quite possibly your own.    One of my 70's college friends from CSU that went into Forestry," Nobody ever talked about money."

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
 

Well, you know you are getting bored with school when you have nothing better to do than partner up with a professor to do some research into skiing. Last semester I took a course with a professor that teaches physiology, and one of his favourite activities is to jump in the water, wrestle with sea critters (otters, seals, horseshoe crabs, you name it) and stick accelerometers on them. Sounds kinda funny, but he swears it is all for science. Anyway, as ski season began, I thought about the forces generated at boot during race turns. After some beer and discussion, he has agreed to loaning a handful of fancy accelerometers to me for the rest of the season so we can track not only forces generated at boot and helmet, but also analyze which turns (left/right) and what type of turns (stivot, carve, etc) need refining. The boot mounts will be drilled to the shell to ensure rigidity between boot and sensor.

 

I'll be updating as things go along, should be mounting them this Thursday at the shop.

I've often thought that we needed to place accelerometers or force transducers on the bottoms of skis of the best in the world.  We could put to rest the question of how much weight should be on the inside ski.   YM

post #6 of 6

Unfortunately, you're not going to find a lot of published research out there. Most of the research is done by ski companies and the USST.

 

Here are some articles you may enjoy:

 

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228009134_Fusion_motion_capture_a_prototype_system_using_inertial_measurement_units_and_GPS_for_the_biomechanical_analysis_of_ski_racing

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skiing! Science! Starting this week I'll be recording and analyzing acceleration at my boots and my helmet.