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Spring ski: Colorado or Utah? [late March, coming from Germany]

post #1 of 57
Thread Starter 

Just got the approval for my annual leave this year... we are planing to ski the last week of March but can't decided where to go. We have never skied in the US before (but we've traveled there quite a few times) so we have no idea what's the best choice that time of the season.

 

What we love are perfectly groomed and non-crowded runs (I know things are quite different here in Europe ;)), old lifts (t-bars, Riblet or Yan doubles, Pomas, etc.) and laid-back ski areas. But we would also try some guided backcountry skiing.

 

I know that we can't make any plans regarding the weather. But as this trip involves a long, expensive flight from Europe, I would like to make sure that we have the best time possible (and see ski areas that are different to what we have here). 

 

Looks like SLC would be a good start for daily trips, but ski areas in Colorado might be more interesting in terms of lifts, views, etc. (not sure if the smaller ones are still open at that time).

 

Any ideas?

post #2 of 57
Powder Mountain in Utah might fit your description. They do have guides, but it's not true backcountry and they're not certified.
They definitely had the old lifts covered.
post #3 of 57

Pretty much every ski area in the States will try to stay open until Easter if they have the snow.

 

Powder Mountain's a good recommendation, but they're pretty low elevation which might leave you vulnerable to a warm streak. They definitely have the laid-back feel, old lifts, great groomers, and backcountry/sidecountry.

 

A little safer bet snow-wise would be Telluride, with the possibility of going over to Silverton for some backcountry (they also have heliskiing available out of Telluride). Telluride gets awesome March snow, their grooming is amazing, and it's pretty laid back, especially in March and April--it's empty, and those who do show are mostly chill locals and spring-breakers from Arizona. Telluride has the oldest running chairlift in Colorado (Lift 7, an SLI double from some time in the 70s) and an old poma (lift 2), although most of the terrain is served by new modern lifts. Plus, Telluride's scenery is amazing and the town is very cool.

post #4 of 57
Thread Starter 

I think the two most important things are good conditions and to get a feeling of the skiing "culture" in the States. Nothing worse than skiing wet snow, I have to do that here in Europe far too often. Backcountry would be nice to have but not a must.

 

I heard so many great things about Telluride so this would be high up on our list (even though it's quite a long drive from Denver). But what about smaller areas like Eldora, Loveland or Cooper? Unfortunately those nice small ski areas like Marble are long gone...

post #5 of 57
Last week of March is the time one need to watch elevation and aspect to get good snow. So higher elevation mountains will be a bit safer...

I think the most "representative" of US skiing are Snowbird/Alta. Bonus are right next door in the form of Birghton and Solitude.

The clusters of resorts along I-70 (Vail complex) in comparison are a bit souless and lacking character (with exception of A-Basin & Loveland)

The southern Colorado resorts all have strong character. I would recommend them more if the OP has a longer stay and be willing to chase the storms around. But for just 1 week, it might be more travel than you feel like it. And if the weather is unfavorable (warm & sunny), which can happen in such a short window, you may not get to actually experience the true feel of American skiing.

Hence my suggestion of Utah. Good skiing, diverse culture (ski wise), and pretty "typical" of what skiing in the US is like! (hint: it's NOT all old lifts & t-bars)
post #6 of 57

I can’t imagine traveling all the way from Germany to ski close to a major city (generally crowded) and stay away from the mountain (think lots of driving, staying in a strip mall, etc.)  I’d recommend the following.  Most of these require either a bit of a drive or a domestic flight.

 

  • Snowmass/Aspen (via DEN or ASE airports)
  • Telluride (via Montrose airport)
  • Sun Valley (via SLC, BOI, or local Sun Valley airport)
  • Big Sky (via BZN)

 

Powder Mountain & Snowbasin could be fun in SLC but you’ll need to drive 30-60 minutes each way, each day and you’ll likely stay in a suburban area.

post #7 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

The clusters of resorts along I-70 (Vail complex) in comparison are a bit souless and lacking character (with exception of A-Basin & Loveland)
 

Souless?  Hardly.  Breckenridge is a real town.  So is Aspen.  If anything, the Cottonwood resorts are souless as there's hardly anyone or anyplace to stay there.  They are, instead, defined by Salt Lake City.  Park City is not much different than the Colorado resorts.

 

Late March is pretty late in our ski season.  I doubt there will be crowds anywhere as most folk will have hung up their skis and started golf, cycling, kids sports, etc.  Cooper is a very small and flat hill.

 

I understand you'd like to have some small ski area experience, but I'd also suggest that that is not the "real" US ski experience.  That being said, why not pick Breckenridge?  It's half an hour to A-Basin, 40 minutes to Loveland, and you can also ski Breckenridge, Copper, and Keystone.  You'll also have the benefit of higher elevation, better snow preservation than Utah, and the possibility of a fair amount of new snow (March/April are two of our highest snowfall months).

 

I'd also bet that the resorts will be pretty much empty.

 

Breckenridge and Copper both have T-Bars and some old slow fixed grip double lifts.  You could also try some cat skiing if you are willing to drive either at Powder Addiction (off of the Denver side of Berthoud Pass) or Steamboat Powder Cats.  Powder Addiction is closer (about an hour and 15 minutes) versus a two-hour drive to Steamboat.

 

 

Mike

post #8 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGerman View Post
 

Just got the approval for my annual leave this year... we are planing to ski the last week of March but can't decided where to go. We have never skied in the US before (but we've traveled there quite a few times) so we have no idea what's the best choice that time of the season.

 

What we love are perfectly groomed and non-crowded runs (I know things are quite different here in Europe ;)), old lifts (t-bars, Riblet or Yan doubles, Pomas, etc.) and laid-back ski areas. But we would also try some guided backcountry skiing.

 

I know that we can't make any plans regarding the weather. But as this trip involves a long, expensive flight from Europe, I would like to make sure that we have the best time possible (and see ski areas that are different to what we have here).

 

Looks like SLC would be a good start for daily trips, but ski areas in Colorado might be more interesting in terms of lifts, views, etc. (not sure if the smaller ones are still open at that time).

 

Any ideas?

 

Weather aside, one thing is for certain - you will see "ski areas that are different".  Beaver Creek has alot of that "perfect groomed" situation if that's really what you are into . Eldora is10 clicks or so past the town of Nederland; an hour west of Boulder; I have been there only in summer (two of my sisters have second homes there), but it seemed to have some slope for a small hill.

 

Anything can happen in late march, including 3 feet of new snow or none at all (can I mention rain?).

post #9 of 57
I'd do SLC in part because it is really easy to access the ski resorts from the airport. Why spend all that time flying and then spend hours in the car?

You could then enjoy Park City as a ski town and hit the resorts there, go visit Alta/Snowbird, and check out Powder Mountain, Solitude, etc if you really feel like spending time in the car to see different mountains. It would give you a lot of flexibility. Sundance Resort is also worth a look...

If you like groomers it is hard to beat Deer Valley near Park City. It definitely is upscale, which isn't what you asked for, but is known for groomers.

I do love Big Sky though.
Edited by NeedAdvice - 1/26/15 at 2:17pm
post #10 of 57

Well coming from Germany I would agree with the Summit/Eagle county Colorado areas as you're likely to be able to get a direct flight to Denver from Boston/New York/Washington DC/Atlanta if that's your U.S. point of entry.

 

If a little extra travel is not a concern then I would agree with the Aspen/Telluride/Big Sky suggestions that have been offered already.

post #11 of 57
...or nonstop from Paris to SLC... ;-)
post #12 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGerman View Post
 

I think the two most important things are good conditions and to get a feeling of the skiing "culture" in the States. Nothing worse than skiing wet snow, I have to do that here in Europe far too often. Backcountry would be nice to have but not a must.

 

I heard so many great things about Telluride so this would be high up on our list (even though it's quite a long drive from Denver). But what about smaller areas like Eldora, Loveland or Cooper? Unfortunately those nice small ski areas like Marble are long gone...

 

Might be best to just book your transatlantic flight now and then wait and see how conditions are. If you just have a week for skiing (are you doing other stuff on your trip, too?), I definitely agree that driving Denver-Telluride doesn't make sense--but as mentioned, a flight within the U.S. to Montrose makes it much easier.

 

I've only been to Eldora once, and it didn't feel particularly special to me--although much of the mountain was closed because of winds. They were, at least at that point, trying to present themselves as another everything-to-everyone resort, but ended up feeling just kind of bland. Arapaho Basin definitely has more character, if you find yourself in the Denver area, but it's not necessarily the best spot for uncrowded groomers.

 

Skiing culture in the States, in my opinion, is pretty diverse and hard to pin down. The tourist-dense areas along I-70 in Colorado honestly do represent the most popular ski experience in the country, and there are great times to be had there--but they're pretty commercialized. That is American, no doubt--but I wouldn't recommend a visitor to the country eating every meal at McDonald's even if that, too, is very American. And that's not to say that the I-70 resorts are equivalent to McDonald's--that's not really fair--but they lean that way. The funky little mountain towns of the Four Corners region are more scenic and offer a really interesting blend of cultures (hippy, cowboy, Mormon, Mexican, Native)--more of the mixing pot that makes the U.S. special. If you can get to Montrose or Albuquerque, there's a lot of really neat towns to explore in between, with potentially some very cool ski mountains (Sandia, Telluride, and Crested Butte are the only ones I've actually skied, and I'd recommend any of the three based on what you've said so far, with Telluride being my top recommendation).

 

If you can watch this year's Warren Miller movie, it's got a pretty cool vignette about Montana's offbeat local hills, too--I haven't been, but that also seems like a road trip worth taking :)

post #13 of 57
Frankfurt has directs to Denver. Rent a car and visit a variety of ski areas and resorts.
post #14 of 57
Thread Starter 

Appreciate all your comments, they are very helpful.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Frankfurt has directs to Denver. Rent a car and visit a variety of ski areas and resorts.

 

Unfortunately those directs are often the most expensive flights. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Utah View Post
 

Skiing culture in the States, in my opinion, is pretty diverse and hard to pin down. The tourist-dense areas along I-70 in Colorado honestly do represent the most popular ski experience in the country, and there are great times to be had there--but they're pretty commercialized. That is American, no doubt--but I wouldn't recommend a visitor to the country eating every meal at McDonald's even if that, too, is very American. And that's not to say that the I-70 resorts are equivalent to McDonald's--that's not really fair--but they lean that way. The funky little mountain towns of the Four Corners region are more scenic and offer a really interesting blend of cultures (hippy, cowboy, Mormon, Mexican, Native)--more of the mixing pot that makes the U.S. special. If you can get to Montrose or Albuquerque, there's a lot of really neat towns to explore in between, with potentially some very cool ski mountains (Sandia, Telluride, and Crested Butte are the only ones I've actually skied, and I'd recommend any of the three based on what you've said so far, with Telluride being my top recommendation).

 

There is enough commercialized (or industrialized) skiing over here in Europe. Express chairs that have to much capacity for the small runs they are serving, etc.. I try to avoid that when possible.

 

For us McDonald's is not American at all (well, depends on where you are going). We've been to almost 30 states over the last 8 years and met so many great people... so we have a different opinion here. :)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevescho View Post
 

 

Weather aside, one thing is for certain - you will see "ski areas that are different".  Beaver Creek has alot of that "perfect groomed" situation if that's really what you are into . Eldora is10 clicks or so past the town of Nederland; an hour west of Boulder; I have been there only in summer (two of my sisters have second homes there), but it seemed to have some slope for a small hill.

 

Anything can happen in late march, including 3 feet of new snow or none at all (can I mention rain?).

 

You can, we are used to that (so far this winter was pretty bad and I was skiing in light rain quite a few times, but is looks like winter is back now).

 

But while discussing our trip here, my wife found a cheap flight to Hawaii ($700 return) so we decided to go skiing next year. And having a quick look at your timetables, it will be late March again. So all this was not in vain and I'm really looking forward to ski some nice resorts in Colorado next year. :)

post #15 of 57
Have a great time in Hawaii. That's a great deal!

Since you are leaning Colorado and have plenty of time to plan, you might want to take a look at buying an Epic Pass over the summer from the Vail website. The March dates would mean you could buy locals passes (because the black out dates won't bother you) which means you would be getting a season pass for like US$325 at the early buyer discount. Vail might be too commercial for you, but there are a lot of nice mountains included in that pass (including some days in Switzerland and France). Obviously not saying you have to by any means, but it is worth keeping in mind.
Edited by NeedAdvice - 1/28/15 at 5:49pm
post #16 of 57
The Mountain Collective is another set of passes available to buy over the summer that could save you money if you are going to spend a few days in multiple locations in North America and prefer that set of mountains.

http://mountaincollective.com/

The Epic Pass is a true season pass where mountain collective gets you a few days at each mountain.

Epic Local Pass is a pretty good deal if you spend enough days on the slopes.

https://order.epicpass.com/
post #17 of 57

If you have only one week you should be flying into Denver or Salt Lake or you're chewing up too much of your trip in travel from Europe.

 

If you want to get off the beaten track into more remote areas, try to push the trip out to 10 days or two weeks.  If the OP can do that, I agree with the southwest itinerary (Telluride etc.) being appropriate for both ambience and the late March timeframe. 

 

Late March in Utah stick with the Cottonwood areas (Alta/Snowbird/Brighton/Solitude). The other places are low altitude, less north exposed and likely to have slushy snow if it's warm.

 

We do hear a lot of comments about spring break crowds in Summit County CO.  It's not that busy in early April, but last week of March might be different.  Breckenridge is one of the most crowded destination resorts, so important to pick an off-peak time to go there.


Edited by Tony Crocker - 2/2/15 at 10:04am
post #18 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedAdvice View Post

Have a great time in Hawaii. That's a great deal!

Since you are leaning Colorado and have plenty of time to plan, you might want to take a look at buying an Epic Pass over the summer from the Vail website. The March dates would mean you could buy locals passes (because the black out dates won't bother you) which means you would be getting a season pass for like US$325 at the early buyer discount. Vail might be too commercial for you, but there are a lot of nice mountains included in that pass (including some days in Switzerland and France). Obviously not saying you have to by any means, but it is worth keeping in mind.

 

I will keep that in mind, thanks!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

If you have only one week you should be flying into Denver or Salt Lake or you're chewing up too much of your trip in travelfrom Europe.

 

If you want to get off the beaten track into more remote areas, try to push the trip out to 10 days or two weeks.  If the OP can do that, I agree with the southwest itinerary (Telluride etc.) being appropriate for both ambience and the late March timeframe. 

 

Late March in Utah stick with the Cottonwood areas (Alta/Snowbird/Brighton/Solitude). The other places are low altitude, less north exposed and likely to have slushy snow if it's warm.

 

We do hear a lot of comments about spring break crowds in Summit County CO.  It's not that busy in early April, but last week of March might be different.  Breckenridge is one of the most crowded destination resorts, so important to pick an off-peak time to go there.

 

I have no problem with a day in the car to get from Denver to Telluride. The idea was to visit New Mexico and Arizona afterwards (but not for skiing) and fly out from San Diego or L.A..

post #19 of 57
Quote:
I have no problem with a day in the car to get from Denver to Telluride. The idea was to visit New Mexico and Arizona afterwards (but not for skiing) and fly out from San Diego or L.A..

I would want at least 2 weeks and preferably 3 to do that.  I drove with a friend to the 2011 early April Epic Gathering in Colorado.  On the way home we visited Arches, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges, Monument Valley and the Grand Canyon on the way home to L.A. 

 

Late March/early April is great timing for a combination trip like that, as long as the skiing is at high altitude/north facing areas.  The weather in the National Parks/Monuments I mentioned is very pleasant; by mid-to-late May it can be very hot in those places.

post #20 of 57
Save the coin on airfare and ski in Europe. You aren't missing anything in the States. Believe me. You are in Germany, drive to St Anton, Ischgl, Solden, Obergurgl, Zillertal Valley, Sella Ronda, Marmolada, go further to Cervinia/Zermatt. Expensive but go to Switzerland. Andermatt has a legit mile of vertical and Engleberg is amazing down the street. Tickets at Vail cost $150+. Euro rate is in your favor. Hit the Dolomites. Eat real Italian food and wash it down with multiple carafes of chianti. I'll trade with you:)
post #21 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmmergauerTele View Post

Save the coin on airfare and ski in Europe. You aren't missing anything in the States. Believe me. You are in Germany, drive to St Anton, Ischgl, Solden, Obergurgl, Zillertal Valley, Sella Ronda, Marmolada, go further to Cervinia/Zermatt. Expensive but go to Switzerland. Andermatt has a legit mile of vertical and Engleberg is amazing down the street. Tickets at Vail cost $150+. Euro rate is in your favor. Hit the Dolomites. Eat real Italian food and wash it down with multiple carafes of chianti. I'll trade with you:)

 

If skiing in Colorado is the same as in those areas, I would totally agree. No need to see more boring and commercialized ski areas like the Zillertal resorts, Soelden or Ischgl. The Dolomites and Zermatt are a nice exception in your list, but both Italy and Switzerland have so much more to offer if you are not always chasing the big ones. 

post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGerman View Post
 

I have no problem with a day in the car to get from Denver to Telluride. The idea was to visit New Mexico and Arizona afterwards (but not for skiing) and fly out from San Diego or L.A..

 

Enjoy Hawaii, and hopefully you can do your big Southwestern US trip next year. And, especially since you're into funky old locals areas, keep an open mind to skiing in New Mexico, Arizona, southern Utah, and California if the conditions are good. Arizona Snowbowl in particular can have big powder days or fantastic spring skiing, and no crowds in the spring. Mount Baldy or Mount Waterman in California seem like great choices for facilities straight out of 1965... the odds of them having good conditions/being open are pretty slim, but might be a great choice if the weather cooperates.

 

I agree with Tony that spring is a fantastic time to tour the Southwest, and also that 2-3 weeks (or more) is ideal.

post #23 of 57
Thread Starter 

As we were really struggling finding nice places to stay during Easter (and as six weeks are way too close to prepare a 3 week trip to Hawaii), we decide to skip the plan, change our flights and go back to the original plan. 

 

To keep things as flexible as possible, we will fly in to Denver and decide where to go based on the conditions. As I said before, driving all the way to Telluride is not an issue. But I still have to decide what the other resorts could be. I was watching a replay of the Ladies' Super-G at Beaver Creek last night. Looks nice, but not that interesting...

post #24 of 57

Glenwood Springs is on the way to Telluride and a fairly easy,  three hour drive from the airport.  Ski Sunlight and the Aspen area's.

post #25 of 57
Quote:
To keep things as flexible as possible, we will fly in to Denver and decide where to go based on the conditions.

How much time in total?  Flying out of Denver or L.A.?  If 3 weeks, you have lots of attractive options.  You should avoid making lodging commitments.  You could easily storm chase to Utah between Colorado and L.A. if you see that in a short term weather prediction.  You should track the OpenSnow forecasts for both states closely leading up to and during your trip. 

http://opensnow.com/dailysnow/colorado

http://opensnow.com/dailysnow/utah

Even within Colorado there can be significant weather differences.  For the past 6 weeks or so the northern/central Colorado areas have done much better than the southern/western areas or Utah.   But that could easily change by the time you arrive.  If the season continues subpar or worsens, spend a little less time skiing and a little more in the national parks, etc.

post #26 of 57

There are so many options with flying into Denver.

 

The closest cluster of ski resorts would be Summit County.  You could base yourself in Frisco or Breckenridge (or Silverthorne/Dillion) and ski Breckenridge, Copper Mountain, Keystone, Arapaho Basin and Loveland.  Vail would be about a 45 minute drive with Beaver Creek being a little longer.  If you do this option I would say definitely go to A-Basin "The Legend" for a day.  Loveland is a great ski area most people drive by, but never ski at.  If it is a clear day (much of it is above timberline) with good visibility Loveland can a fun place to explore.  I really like Breckenridge (I work there) and it has a lot to offer with skiing on five mountains and the highest chair lift in North America at 12,840' (A-Basin and Loveland have chairs that reach almost just as high).  The town of Breck is great, though it is very commercialized now.  Keystone and Copper are great places, too.  With this option you could ski a different ski area everyday if you wanted to.

 

Going west you could stay near Vail or Beaver Creek and ski the two areas.  They are about 15 miles or so apart.   Vail is big by North American standards, not so much when compared to Europe though.  Beaver Creek doesn't get enough credit.  The terrain at Beaver Creek is steeper and has more continuous verticle you can ski than Vail does.  Both of these areas have lots of pretentious guests and locals.  The towns/villages at these areas are very commercialized and upscale.  I do enjoy skiing at both Vail and Beaver Creek and I understand when going there I have to deal with the people and the towns.

 

Continuing west you go to Glenwood Springs/Aspen areas.  Glenwood Springs is right on highway 70 and I think something like 30 miles or so from the town of Aspen.  Sunlight is the samll local's ski area in Glenwood Springs.  The Aspen collection includes Aspen (Ajax) Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Snowmass and Buttermilk.  The town of Aspen is a neat town with Aspen Mountain right in the center of town.  Many people complain about snobby people in Aspen, but I can say I have ever experienced that and I have been there for 7 or 8 ski trips (now Vail on the other hand...).  Snowmass has it's own village at the base of the resort with many lodging and dining options.  It is not uncommon for peope to stay at Snowmass and go into the town of Aspen one or two nights while they are there.  Snowmass is a fitting name as the ski area is pretty big (again by North America standards) with a very good variety of ski terrain.  Aspen Highlands is a great ski area too and I always make sure to ski there at least one day when I go to Aspen/Snowmass.  Buttermilk is known as a beginners area though they do have a few black diamond runs that you will have to yourself if you ski them.

 

Going to Southwest Colorado you have Telluride, Crested Butte and Durango along with other smaller places.  Telluride is the largest ski resort in Southwest Colorado with a very cool old town to go with it.  Telluride is a little difficult to get to and a little pricy, but worth the trip.  Telluride has been popular with the "Hollywood set" for some time now (once Aspen became so popular quite a few famous people moved on to Telluride, Oprah owns or did own a place here).  If you go to Telluride that is pretty much the only place you can ski as there are no other ski areas close enough to make a day trip to.  Crested Butte is a smaller ski area, but it has some very good expert terrain.  The town of Crested Butte is a neat old western town.  I enjoyed Crested Butte the one time I went there.  Durango or is it Purgatory is a smaller ski area as well with a nice little town.  I did a short 5 day trip to Durango/Purgatory and took a day to ski Wolf Creek (awesome place for powder).  It was definitely worth the trip.  One of my memorable ski trips was spending a week traveling around Southwest Colorado skiing Telluride a few days, Crested Butte a couple days then to Monarch for a day as we headed back east.

 

There is also Steamboat in Northern Colorado which I have been to a number of times and is a great place, but Steamboat is off by itself.  You could do 2 or 3 days at Steamboat then go south a couple hours to Summit County for the rest of your trip.  Winter Park is another option, though I don't know if there is enough at Winter Park for a full week and the town is just okay.  You could drive to Winter Park to ski for a day from Summit County (Frisco or Breckenridge) which is how I have most often skied Winter Park.

post #27 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

How much time in total?  Flying out of Denver or L.A.?  If 3 weeks, you have lots of attractive options.  You should avoid making lodging commitments.  You could easily storm chase to Utah between Colorado and L.A. if you see that in a short term weather prediction.  You should track the OpenSnow forecasts for both states closely leading up to and during your trip. 

http://opensnow.com/dailysnow/colorado

http://opensnow.com/dailysnow/utah

Even within Colorado there can be significant weather differences.  For the past 6 weeks or so the northern/central Colorado areas have done much better than the southern/western areas or Utah.   But that could easily change by the time you arrive.  If the season continues subpar or worsens, spend a little less time skiing and a little more in the national parks, etc.

 

Our trip is getting pretty close now and based on the forecast provided by opensnow there is a chance of colder weather (and maybe snow) by the end of next week. We have already booked a room in Telluride but it can be canceled on short notice. We will spent up to five days in Colorado before heading south to New Mexico. Would be great to have at least one bluebird day with some nice skiing as I haven't had a lot of those days this season here in Europe.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiwithjohn View Post
 

There are so many options with flying into Denver.

 

Nice overview, thanks.

post #28 of 57

I've been lurking on this thread for a bit -- I'm flying out west the last week in March, so I appreciate all the good info.  

 

I'm no expert, but I think you could also look at Targhee/Jackson Hole (drive via Steamboat?), as I think they tend to get different storm tracks.  They haven't had as good a season, but i think they'll ski fine if they get a nice spring storm, no?   Personally, I'm booked on a miles flight to Jackson, but keeping it flexible and may divert south -- my sense is that it would be easier to divert to Crested Butte / Telluride / Durango / Taos at the last minute. 

 

I'm not a real powder chaser:  how long should I wait before making a decision?  How much more accurate are the 5-day vs. 10-day forecasts? 

post #29 of 57

Of the spots mentioned, you would have to think that Taos and Telluride are probably in the best shape right now as they both have the elevation and northerly aspect which are so critical in the snow preservation department along with nice base depths for their terrain.  While Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee have had more snow, they are both suffering horribly of late.

post #30 of 57

Thanks lofc.  I booked Jackson a few months ago when they were swimming in the snow; since then, not so much.  I think if it doesn't snow between now and the end of the month, I'll be diverting south to Telluride or Taos. 

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